ot Blizzardy Warning? whiskey tango foxtrot

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  • OK, this morning it's 5F on my porch.  Opened the door, swept the new snow off for 3 minutes and felt my ears tingling. surprise

  • MistaraMistara Posts: 38,675

    OK, this morning it's 5F on my porch.  Opened the door, swept the new snow off for 3 minutes and felt my ears tingling. surprise

     

    polar vortexfrown

  • ByrdieByrdie Posts: 1,713

    -4 Celsius with a -11 windchill and the Blizzard of the Week is now on. Can't see out my window with all the blowing snow. 20-30 centimeters predicted for the Avalon Peninsula, where I live, before it's all done. But they also said that it's gonna turn to rain later tonight/tomorrow. An unpleasant mess, the only good thing to be said about it is at least it didn't start until after my Aunt Roma's funeral earlier today. Which I had to miss on account of my arthritis flaring up again. crying Maybe when the weather is warmer I'll feel better. At least the power is holding up, though we are prepared (somewhat) for outages.

  • Oso3DOso3D Posts: 14,617

    Kids ate on the back porch, and I think in a bit we're going to take a dip in the complex's outdoor pool.

    It's a little cool, but doable.

     

    ... What?

    (I DO NOT MISS living on the east coast)

  • LeatherGryphonLeatherGryphon Posts: 9,911
    edited February 2016

    Well, they said it would be cold this morning.sad  It's 0F on my porch this morning, but I'm toasty warm inside.  However, I have to go out and clean the snow off the car and try to find someone on a Sunday to plow the driveway to make sure I can get out for a Cardiologist appointment tomorrow morning.indecision

    Post edited by LeatherGryphon on
  • McGyverMcGyver Posts: 5,928

    Right now the weather center is saying 1°F (-17.22° C), but my car is insisting -2° F (-18.88° C)... The wind chill is around -17° F (-27.22° C)... I'd check the small digital thermometer outside my garage, but the display is gone... Probably too cold for the batteries or the liquid crystals... I knew I should have gotten that fusion core one... I can't really test wind chill, but based on the wind speed and the angle of the frozen squirrel, I'd say it feels around two million degrees below everything (-2,000,000° E) outside right now.  The winds this morning were crazy... Probably around 35-40 mph, I don't know what the windchill was at that point but it was -4°F outside the car at that point... Now it's just a bit breezy here and there and windchill is -17°F.  

    No naked Barbecuing today crying... Oh well.

  • -11F here. sad Hope you are enjoying your -2F heat wave!!! cheeky

  • McGyverMcGyver Posts: 5,928

    Okay, now I feel obligated to barbecue today...  

  • MistaraMistara Posts: 38,675

    cold outside hurts, oww.  

  • McGyverMcGyver Posts: 5,928

    Yeah, I know... I just tried the bbq thing... It's not happening.

  • McGyverMcGyver Posts: 5,928
    edited February 2016

    Frost on the window...

    Less than two minutes after I took these, they all melted... I guess I notced them because the sun was on them, but at the same time that started them melting.

    Post edited by McGyver on
  • ByrdieByrdie Posts: 1,713

    Oh my, that is pretty! I wonder what render settings Mother Nature uses. Sure beats anything I've ever gotten out of Poser or Studio.cool

  • LeatherGryphonLeatherGryphon Posts: 9,911
    edited February 2016
    Byrdie said:

    Oh my, that is pretty! I wonder what render settings Mother Nature uses. Sure beats anything I've ever gotten out of Poser or Studio.cool

     Mother Nature uses really tiny pixels and has practiced for 13.8 billion years. Shows you what technology and persistence will do. 

     

    Post edited by LeatherGryphon on
  • ByrdieByrdie Posts: 1,713

    Not the tech so much maybe, as what you do with it. 13.8 billion years? That's one heckuva lot of experience, us poor humans'll never catch up. sad

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 33,604

    Having grown up in an era when central heating wasn't common, one of the first things I would do on really cold mornings was check the windows to see what frost patterns had been left for me.  They are so pretty.

     

  • I live in Nova Scotia, Canada.  We get everything from snow, ice pellets, freezing rain and rain in the winter months and sometimes on the same day!  It is currently around -13 C with a wind chill of -21 C and there is supposed to be freezing rain in the morning. We have just had a weather advisory put up to expect "significant" rains on Tuesday and Wednesday with temperatures around +8 C; then it is going to drop to -6 C on Wednesday night.  I spent some of my childhood in Bermuda and the UK and I've never gotten used to Canadian winters.  I try to hibernate ... thank the gods for the computer.  :))

    PS to the UK members who are old enough to remember, I was in boarding school in the UK when there was a coal miner's strike and oil embargos so no heat at all.  We would go to bed with every blanket we owned, as many clothes as we could and winter coats.  I was never so cold in my life.  :)

  • ByrdieByrdie Posts: 1,713

    I think we may be of the same era, or thereabout. When I was growing up I did the same, along with having to crack the ice in the water bucket so I could get a drink -- we had to carry water from the nearest neighbour's well and there was no indoor plumbing not just for me but half the hill until around '73-'74. Now that was fun. surprise Heating and cooking done on the big wood and coal stove in the kitchen, and we had plenty of Nan's handmade quilts to keep the bed warm on a cold winter's night. 

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 33,604
    edited February 2016

    We lived in a typical UK semi, built 1930s.  Had fireplaces in the two living rooms and upstairs in the two main bedrooms (those were blocked up though). However normally the only fire that was lit was the one in the back room. Front room was only for special occasions. Coal fires. The back room one had a back burner, only source of hot water except for a small hot water heater in the kitchen which held about a gallon. Our neighbours thought we were posh though because we had a bathroom and an indoors toilet. The rest of the street were Victorian terraced houses with outside loos. Was in the SE of England, so didn't get anywhere near as cold as the temps you get Byrdie.

    EmotionalOutlet  I guess that would have been one of the strikes in the 1970s? By that time we were on gas heating, so didn't suffer too much.

    Post edited by Chohole on
  • ByrdieByrdie Posts: 1,713

    When my Grandfather bought this place in the 30's, it was already ancient and he had to rebuild it almost entirely on the inside. Bathrooms, yeah, that would indeed be posh; I never saw indoor plumbing anywhere but in the doctor's office and the rectory, was lucky though because by the time I went to school we didn't have to use an outhouse or carry wood to light the old pot-bellied stove like my parents and uncles all did. 

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 33,604

    Some of the kids today don't know what fun they missed.

  • ByrdieByrdie Posts: 1,713
    edited February 2016

    All too true, alas. They've grown soft, thanks to all this modern living. cheeky

    (Then again, so have I. blush)

    Post edited by Byrdie on
  • Chohole said:

     

    EmotionalOutlet  I guess that would have been one of the strikes in the 1970s? By that time we were on gas heating, so didn't suffer too much.

    It was indeed!  And the boarding school was a big drafty place to start.  No such thing as insulation. :)  It was barely warm at the best of times even though down in Sussex. Can't imagine how it would have been up North.  

    Byrdie, I'm all for modern living!  I've had the pellet stove going all day and night.  Nice and toasty in the house, despite being frigid outside.  When younger I never understood how "old" people could stand keeping the thermostat so high ... until I became one of them. :))

  • ByrdieByrdie Posts: 1,713

    Wish I had a wood stove. Right now we're on another power alert for the next 24-48 hours on account of an incoming cold weather system. Not to mention the darn station has 2 of it's 3 generators on the fritz and they're only running at maybe half normal capacity. frown

  • LeatherGryphonLeatherGryphon Posts: 9,911
    edited February 2016

    Yeah, I remember in the '50s when we had coal and wood heat.  The house had air leaks all over the place but when the coal furnace was kept stoked the house was really quite warm away from the windows.  But back in those days we had thick heavy drapes that closed over the windows.  More than just decoration, they were insulation too.   We converted to a gas furnace in the '60s.  Then I went away to college in Florida in '66.

    I've moved back up here and this house has gas furnace too but nowadays if the power goes out I can stay in bed toasty warm under my electric blanket.  Oh, wait... crying

    Post edited by LeatherGryphon on
  • namffuaknamffuak Posts: 3,732
    Chohole said:

    Some of the kids today don't know what fun they missed.

    Yeah - like being told (at age 7) that you're old enough to throw a scoop or two of coal in the furnace before going to school in the morning and again when you got home. OTOH, there's nothing like inflating the tee-shirt over the hot air register for a while before putting it on . . .

    LeatherGryphon - we converted to gas in the '60s as well; my friend's father went with the power company's offer of free installation if he converted to electric heat. But the free installation did not include additional insulation . . . their electric bills were huge.

  • kyoto kidkyoto kid Posts: 38,483
    McGyver said:

    Frost on the window...

    Less than two minutes after I took these, they all melted... I guess I notced them because the sun was on them, but at the same time that started them melting.

    ..I used to remember that back when I lived in Wisconsin on the outer storm windows.  Actually quite pretty

  • kyoto kidkyoto kid Posts: 38,483
    edited February 2016

    I live in Nova Scotia, Canada.  We get everything from snow, ice pellets, freezing rain and rain in the winter months and sometimes on the same day!  It is currently around -13 C with a wind chill of -21 C and there is supposed to be freezing rain in the morning. We have just had a weather advisory put up to expect "significant" rains on Tuesday and Wednesday with temperatures around +8 C; then it is going to drop to -6 C on Wednesday night.  I spent some of my childhood in Bermuda and the UK and I've never gotten used to Canadian winters.  I try to hibernate ... thank the gods for the computer.  :))

    PS to the UK members who are old enough to remember, I was in boarding school in the UK when there was a coal miner's strike and oil embargos so no heat at all.  We would go to bed with every blanket we owned, as many clothes as we could and winter coats.  I was never so cold in my life.  :)

    Yeah, I remember in the '50s when we had coal and wood heat.  The house had air leaks all over the place but when the coal furnace was kept stoked the house was really quite warm away from the windows.  But back in those days we had thick heavy drapes that closed over the windows.  More than just decoration, they were insulation too.   We converted to a gas furnace in the '60s.  Then I went away to college in Florida in '66.

    I've moved back up here and this house has gas furnace too but nowadays if the power goes out I can stay in bed toasty warm under my electric blanket.  Oh, wait... crying

     

    Where I grew up in Wisconsin that was the norm as we had an old coal furnace and houses back then were not built with weatherising in mind..Many Victorians acutally used newspaper as insulation.

    Post edited by kyoto kid on
  • McGyverMcGyver Posts: 5,928

    This house was built in 1917 and has lots of weird legacy alterations and what not... Like most of the windows in the house are examples of the evolution of windows over the last 99 years... The windows with the frost are probably from the 50s and had no insulation, I made special interior storm window inserts so the room would be livable in the winter. The side effect though is they frost over in the mornings if it's cold enough.

  • StratDragonStratDragon Posts: 3,167
    MistyMist said:

    ...No naked Barbecuing today crying... Oh well.

    just sit on the grill lid between flips. 

  • MistaraMistara Posts: 38,675

    fer crying outloud, it's snowing outside.

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