JACK TOMALIN APPRECIATION SOCIETY [JAS III]

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  • TotteTotte Posts: 13,494
    edited December 1969

    underground streets? sounds like a new model

    I had the same thought, like Curios Hallway but much more creepy, dark and dirty.

  • BagletBaglet Posts: 0
    edited January 2013

    underground streets? sounds like a new model

    They're for real. See: Mary Kings Closeand Video and wiki. They were orginally very narrow streets of tall tenement houses in the old town (the one on the hill) that became buried under later developments.

    Post edited by Baglet on
  • Daz Jack TomalinDaz Jack Tomalin Posts: 13,115
    edited December 1969

    Mary Kings Close was the one we walked around - was amazing!

  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,287
    edited December 1969

    oh bloody hell, i just watched a documentary on this, they were researching "ghost hauntings"

  • Daz Jack TomalinDaz Jack Tomalin Posts: 13,115
    edited December 1969

    Yea, one room in particular was meant to be haunted by this little girl called Annie.

    We also did the night tour of Greyfriars Cemetery, which was also pretty eerie. Really interesting, and pretty harrowing stories from them all.

  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,287
    edited December 1969

    http://www.hulu.com/#!watch/429746#i0,p0,d0

    about two thirds in they get to the "vaults" in Scotland

  • BagletBaglet Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    So does this mean we'll be getting some old Edinburgh tenements one of these days?

    Could do an underground and open option - not that they ever saw much daylight when there was sky above.

  • Daz Jack TomalinDaz Jack Tomalin Posts: 13,115
    edited December 1969

    Yea, certainly given me a few ideas.. :)

  • cosmo71cosmo71 Posts: 3,609
    edited December 1969

    Was pretty amazing.. And to think people lived in those conditions is unreal.

    Happy new Year Jack,

    never been to Edinburgh, just southcoast of England and eight or more times in London. What you think, is one week time enough for Edinburgh or to long or to short?

  • Daz Jack TomalinDaz Jack Tomalin Posts: 13,115
    edited December 1969

    Well I'd definitely say a week is not too long - and I'm sure you could fill a week easily. It all really depends what you like, or what you want to do, but there's so much I have no doubt that you'd want to go back no matter how long you stayed.

    Even walking about, you could spend a good few days doing. Add in a few tours, an afternoon or two in the Whisky tasting place, plus some time to just sit and take it all in.. :)

  • SedorSedor Posts: 1,764
    edited January 2013

    Happy New Year Jack!

    Years ago I've got an invitation to Edinburgh by some guys, they told me that I have to plan with two weeks... because they wanted me to show _the_ Edinburgh Blues Club... At the first day we get in and after two weeks they let me out... o_O

    I've never been there... also I've never been to England... I am not sure if it's caused because of what they said (and what makes me frightning when thinking about what all could happen due that days :P )

    Post edited by Sedor on
  • TotteTotte Posts: 13,494
    edited December 1969

    Edinburgh seems to be the place for the next Bald Wizards Club Virtual gathering. Now Jack needs to make some models of the Royal Mile so we can render the gathering ;-)

  • SedorSedor Posts: 1,764
    edited December 1969

    For me... that sounds like a very good plan!

    Jack... how long do you need? 1? 2? days? ;)

  • cosmo71cosmo71 Posts: 3,609
    edited December 1969

    Well I'd definitely say a week is not too long - and I'm sure you could fill a week easily. It all really depends what you like, or what you want to do, but there's so much I have no doubt that you'd want to go back no matter how long you stayed.

    Even walking about, you could spend a good few days doing. Add in a few tours, an afternoon or two in the Whisky tasting place, plus some time to just sit and take it all in.. :)

    sounds good and like the days/weeks I spend with friends in London..."Pub & Culture - Tours" that is how I call such vacations :)

  • cosmo71cosmo71 Posts: 3,609
    edited December 1969

    one sight and then a view pints in a pub, next sight and then a view pints in a pub, next sight and then... and this a whole day and the whole week :)

  • cosmo71cosmo71 Posts: 3,609
    edited December 1969

    I do have to say that I love London, this city has it.

  • SimonJMSimonJM Posts: 5,945
    edited December 1969

    cosmo71 said:
    one sight and then a view pints in a pub, next sight and then a view pints in a pub, next sight and then... and this a whole day and the whole week :)

    ... and then a few pints in a pub and then a view of hospital ward ceiling ... :)

    Personally, despite being much like Cosmo (SE England, bit of London) I really like Durham.

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 33,604
    edited December 1969

    I lived almost in London all my life, was actually born in a rather nice part of SW London, but couldn't wait to get as far away as I could once we both stopped working. Managed to move almost 200 miles away and never regretted it.

  • Miss BMiss B Posts: 3,071
    edited December 1969

    And here I always thought you were Welsh by birth. Live and learn. ;-)

  • Daz Jack TomalinDaz Jack Tomalin Posts: 13,115
    edited December 1969

    cosmo71 said:
    Well I'd definitely say a week is not too long - and I'm sure you could fill a week easily. It all really depends what you like, or what you want to do, but there's so much I have no doubt that you'd want to go back no matter how long you stayed.

    Even walking about, you could spend a good few days doing. Add in a few tours, an afternoon or two in the Whisky tasting place, plus some time to just sit and take it all in.. :)

    sounds good and like the days/weeks I spend with friends in London..."Pub & Culture - Tours" that is how I call such vacations :)

    Perfect!

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 33,604
    edited January 2013

    Miss B said:
    And here I always thought you were Welsh by birth. Live and learn. ;-)

    LOL Welsh by marriage I am afraid, my 2nd husband was Welsh, and as number 3 and I have never bothered to get married I still have my late husband's surname. I do have both Irish and Scots blood in reasonably large proportions, does that count.

    Oh and BTW I can pronounce Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwll-llantysiliogogogoch

    Post edited by Chohole on
  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,634
    edited December 1969

    No we won't hold, beng born down south, against you...now that you live in Wales...mawhahahahaha

  • TotteTotte Posts: 13,494
    edited December 1969

    chohole said:

    Oh and BTW I can pronounce Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwll-llantysiliogogogoch

    LOL, made me think of two jokes.

    (a) What's long and hard and given to a woman by a Welsh man? The home address ;-)

    (b) An American couple went to Wales to one of those town with hard to pronounce name. They went for a lunch at a burger joint and asked the cashier to tell them where they were, and told her to say it slowly so they could get it. The blond cashier replied "Buuurgeeer Kiiiiiing"

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,634
    edited December 1969

    Now I am impressed, welsh jokes in sweden...love it. :)

  • SimonJMSimonJM Posts: 5,945
    edited December 1969

    Totte said:
    chohole said:

    Oh and BTW I can pronounce Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwll-llantysiliogogogoch

    LOL, made me think of two jokes.

    (a) What's long and hard and given to a woman by a Welsh man? The home address ;-)

    (b) An American couple went to Wales to one of those town with hard to pronounce name. They went for a lunch at a burger joint and asked the cashier to tell them where they were, and told her to say it slowly so they could get it. The blond cashier replied "Buuurgeeer Kiiiiiing"

    True story ...
    Back in the *cough ahem* time of long ago, at the end of a high school term our strange maths teacher decided to give us little oiks a break and that we would have a quiz, with the two teams being decided by simple division of the class into left and right. The rules were simple - someone on team left would come up with a question for team right to answer, and then vice versa. In those days we had a few trainspotters in our midst (ok, I was one ...) and one of my team (team right) voiced the question, "what railway station lies between ..." and then came up with two Welsh place names (I cannot recall which, sorry). Team right were jubilant, all knowing what the answer would be. Silence ... then someone on team left said, "Llanfairpwll.... etc., etc." the whole thing! Team right were silent, team left were now jubilant! Silence finally fell and the question asker quietly said, "no, Cardiff"! :) Oh, so young to be so devious!

  • TotteTotte Posts: 13,494
    edited December 1969

    Haha - did he or she end up as a politician or CEO of a multinational corporation?

  • SimonJMSimonJM Posts: 5,945
    edited December 1969

    Totte said:
    Haha - did he or she end up as a politician or CEO of a multinational corporation?

    A good question! I don't think I've seen him for about 40 years. A quick google gave me someone of around the right age being an athlete (results in Bideford) - assuming I remembered how to spell his last name! I was the runner in our year, he was ... stockier and preferred the slow but sure approach (slow in pace and sure to give up) ;)

  • Miss BMiss B Posts: 3,071
    edited December 1969

    chohole said:
    Miss B said:
    And here I always thought you were Welsh by birth. Live and learn. ;-)

    LOL Welsh by marriage I am afraid, my 2nd husband was Welsh, and as number 3 and I have never bothered to get married I still have my late husband's surname. I do have both Irish and Scots blood in reasonably large proportions, does that count.

    Oh and BTW I can pronounce Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwll-llantysiliogogogoch
    Oh sure, show off why don't ya. ~ROFL~

    Hmmmm, large proportions of both Irish and Scots blood. That must make for rather interesting family reunions with the extended family. :coolsmirk:

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 33,604
    edited December 1969

    With large infusions of Scotch and Irish Whiskey of course. lol. Actually we do tend to be a family that didn't keep in touch too much with distant relatives. Mother was deemed to have "married below herself"

  • Daz Jack TomalinDaz Jack Tomalin Posts: 13,115
    edited December 1969

    large infusions of Scotch and Irish Whiskey of course

    Amen to that!

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