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  • Emo SludgeEmo Sludge Posts: 79

    This goes in the general category of "small gestures" that EVERY comic book creator seems to think about at some point.

    There a few ways that most us to convey these small moments.

    a) Put the word <blinks> in the paragraph so it's part of the speech balloon.

    "If I gave you a hint

    <blinks nervously>

    that something was wrong,

    you would get it"

    b) Use the word blinks as a small sound effect and place in near the face.

    c) Have the narrator mention it.

    d) Have another character mention it.

    e) Use action lines to show the motion of the eye lids or eye lashes

    ------------------

    This also goes for head-nods.

    ---------------------

    And then there's also the practice of blending both states together (in this case, eyes open, eyes closed) to show the close transition.

    I would argue that you never want to add actions in the dialogue, that's kind of awkward and a bit of a cop out on the part of the cartoonist. Same goes with the narration, the narrator should only really be describing things that can't be shown like thoughts or emotions or sense memories. I think B is probably the best advice if you are really needing to have blinking happen in a single panel, although blinking doesn't really have a sound so it's kind of weird too. In japanese there are all kinds of sound effects and onamonapia for things like blinking or even thinking, so manga artists have it a bit easier in this regard lol.

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,392
    edited June 2020

     

    MAJourney said:

    How would y9u show eyes blinking? multiple images doesnt seem right

    Why would you want to show blinking in a comic? 

    If the effect you're trying to go for is a break in the action or slowing down the pace, multiple panels would work fine. You would really only have blinking in a comic if it was an action the reader is meant to focus on. Just make sure your panels showing the blinking are smaller in some way than your average panel, because it's a short action and panel size/length is often used to show the perceived passage of time.

    Well, because after this, we'rer in on her eyes in a brighter place. i'd be blinking myself. lol

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  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,392

    Man, i can't decide if i wanna iput 

     

    AAAAIIIIEEEE!

     

    at the bottom of that

  • Griffin AvidGriffin Avid Posts: 3,532

    the narrator should only really be 

    All of this falls under you own personal preferences. There are no 'rules' only standard practices.

    The only point is, do the readers get it?

    I, personally, don't make stuff for other-people-who-make-stuff.

    There's lots of things and established conventions that readers still don't seem to get.

    And the response is usually "read more comics".

  • Emo SludgeEmo Sludge Posts: 79
    MAJourney said:

     

    MAJourney said:

    How would y9u show eyes blinking? multiple images doesnt seem right

    Why would you want to show blinking in a comic? 

    If the effect you're trying to go for is a break in the action or slowing down the pace, multiple panels would work fine. You would really only have blinking in a comic if it was an action the reader is meant to focus on. Just make sure your panels showing the blinking are smaller in some way than your average panel, because it's a short action and panel size/length is often used to show the perceived passage of time.

    Well, because after this, we'rer in on her eyes in a brighter place. i'd be blinking myself. lol

    Personally I would have her squinting if you're saying that she's reacting to a sudden brighter light. That's my suggestion. Sometimes what might feel natural for you to do in real life might not feel as natural in the medium.

     

    the narrator should only really be 

    All of this falls under you own personal preferences. There are no 'rules' only standard practices.

    The only point is, do the readers get it?

    I, personally, don't make stuff for other-people-who-make-stuff.

    There's lots of things and established conventions that readers still don't seem to get.

    And the response is usually "read more comics".

    Fair enough. It's not so much "rules" as it is suggestions on how to make the storytelling flow more smoothly for the average reader. I enjoy finding creative ways to break the rules, so I'd be the last person to say "you must make art this way", but if you don't already have a strong handle on the medium it tends to be easier to get your ideas across by following some basic guidelines until your own personal style and skills grow to a point that you can make something you feel succeeds using unconventional methods. That's not to say you can't just experiment and never learn the rules and invent your own rules from scratch, but in my experience you'll get there faster when you already know how readers are used to experiencing the work that they read.

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,392

    Hey, anyone know how to make shrinking curved speed lines 8in Photoshop?

     

    OT: Photoshop Elements users, if you're like me and been pained by the lack of some features like the mighty Pen Tool, check out "Elements+". I now have a pen tool i my PSE14!

  • 3Diva3Diva Posts: 11,017
    MAJourney said:

    Hey, anyone know how to make shrinking curved speed lines 8in Photoshop?

     

    OT: Photoshop Elements users, if you're like me and been pained by the lack of some features like the mighty Pen Tool, check out "Elements+". I now have a pen tool i my PSE14!

    Blank Layer >> Make Dots >> Motion Blur >> Transform >> Perspective >> Transform >> Warp.

    You can also find tutorials via Google Search. :)

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,392

    I've not found any tuts on gradually thinning lines.

     

    think of a swirl. starts thick and grows smaller toward the center

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