How to Use dForce: Creating a Blanket, Draping Clothes on Furniture, and Much More [Commercial]

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Comments

  • DaventakiDaventaki Posts: 1,509

    @Vanishot this is how I learned to do sitting poses dForce video by Esha.  And of course RGcincy has got a lot of information here to! 

  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784

    That's a good reference Daventaki. I added a link to it on my index page.

  • RGcincy said:

    Duration is stabilization time if using a current frame simulation otherwise it's the length of your timeline (default is 30 frames). 

    Your image shows the dress inside the cushions. You may be able to start from a memorized pose (usually that will be the default A or T-pose).to keep it outside but I suspect the figure would end up standing inside the couch.To avoid that, do a timeline simulation. Start at frame 0 with the figure standing in front of the couch. Be sure the dress is entirely in front of the couch. At frame 15 have the figure sitting in the desired final pose. When a figure moves in dForce there are momentum effects that can affect the way the clothing drapes. Then you will have 15 frames for the dress to settle.

    Alternatively, you can animate the couch. Move the couch back, put the figure in the final pose, use start from a memorized pose which will cause the figure to stand, and animate the couch so it moves into place before the figure sits downs. 

    So these timline renders or animations I have never done. This is even for 1 frame shots? It sounds like it is. I will do my best to try and figure out that process having never done it. Thank you!!

  • Daventaki said:

    @Vanishot this is how I learned to do sitting poses dForce video by Esha.  And of course RGcincy has got a lot of information here to! 

    Thank you for this recource!!

     

  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784
    Vanishot said:

    So these timeline renders or animations I have never done. This is even for 1 frame shots? It sounds like it is. I will do my best to try and figure out that process having never done it. Thank you!!

    Yes, you can (and often want to do) timeline simulations even for 1 frame shots. Even if you are not changing poses, the timeline preserves each frame of the simulation so you can scroll through to select the best result (sometimes draping goes too far) or identify where an explosion is starting to occur (e.g. a button or zipper that has too high a dynamic strength). You can also have a starting pose that is not the memorized pose and a second pose at frame 10 (of a 30 frame simulation).

  • Hey folks,

    How would solve the following? You have a strap, with a buckle in the middle. You need to fix both ends of the strap to the front and back of your garment. The garment is simulated with dforce, so the straps must follow their attaching points.

    I'd appreciate any tips.

     

     

    Cheers

     

     

  • SevrinSevrin Posts: 6,197

    Hey folks,

    How would solve the following? You have a strap, with a buckle in the middle. You need to fix both ends of the strap to the front and back of your garment. The garment is simulated with dforce, so the straps must follow their attaching points.

    I'd appreciate any tips.

     

     

    Cheers

     

     

    This is a separate strap that you are adding to the garment?  If that's the case, what I would do is use Mesh Grabber to get the strap to do it what I want to do.  dForce is fine and all, but it's not the best solution for every situation.

  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784
    edited May 2020

    How would solve the following? You have a strap, with a buckle in the middle. You need to fix both ends of the strap to the front and back of your garment. The garment is simulated with dforce, so the straps must follow their attaching points.

    For attaching the straps, create two small 1-inch primitive spheres. Position them so the spheres overlap the ends of the strap and the garment at the point of attachment. Add a dForce dynamic modifier to the garment and the strap but not the spheres. The images below show the result.

      

    The problem with the above approach is the spheres remain in their original position and holds the garment in place. You can add a dynamic modifier to the spheres and then set bend, shear, and stretch stiffness to 0.01 on them (to avoid explosions). Run an animated simulation. You'll likely find that one or both ends of the strap pulls away but you can frequently find an intermediate frame that works. (I used another sphere at the top of the cube to hold it everything in place otherwise everything would fall out of the frame with gravity; a garment on a figure would not have this issue.)

    Instead of adding a dForce modifier to the spheres, you could animate the spheres so they move towards each other and down during the simulation. This would be trial and error - run the simulation with the garment, see where the points of attachment end up, then move the spheres to those spots at frame 10 (be sure to set a keyframe at frame 0 so the spheres remain attached to strap and garment at time 0) and repeat the simulation until you are happy with the result.

     

     

     

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    Post edited by RGcincy on
  • Thanks guys, awesome! I'll experiment with these solutions!

  • This webinar is happening THIS Sunday the 17th of May, presented by rgcincy and includes free and premium tickets.

    Richard will be answering questions live on dForce, demonstrating some of the knowledge shared in this thread.

    What's you number one challenge with dForce?

    https://digitalartlive.com/event/dforce-solutions/

    • For some it’s understanding what dForce is in the first place
    • Many want to know how to create dForce clothing
    • Others want to know how to use dForce clothing with their characters
    • How to add a dForce modifier?
    • How to use dForce hair?
    • How do I avoid dForce explosions?
    • What do all the simulation and surface settings mean?

    This webinar event has Richard Schafermeyer (rgcicny) who has THE longest running dForce thread on the DAZ forums (now 34 pages!) answering your questions in a live setting. Richard has been experimenting with many aspects of the physics engine since it came into being.

    Webinar Content

    • Richard will present answers to the 3 most asked questions about dForce (first 30 minutes)
    • The rest of the webinar will be your questions and Richard’s answers

    Register for a free or premium ticket here : https://digitalartlive.com/event/dforce-solutions/

  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784
    edited May 2020

    Thanks to all who participated in the webinar yesterday. Glad to answer any questions that might come up as you use dForce. Here is one example I did not have time to cover.

     

    83. Making a Sash for a Dress. The question was asked above  how you can wrap a strap with a buckle in the middle around a figure. Instead of a strap, I use a sash for this this example

    a. Add a figure and a clothing item. I used dForce Adrian Gown for Genesis 8 Females.

    b. Create a 1.5 foot Z-positive plane with 20 divisions. Set X-scale to 87% and Y-scale to 12%. Move it on the Y- and Z-axis until it’s in front of the waist of the figure.

    c. Create a Y-positive cylinder that is 3 inches tall, 1 inch in diameter, with 16 sides and 24 segments. Create a second identical cylinder.

    d. Position a cylinder at either end of the plane with just enough overlap so the ends of the sash are inside the cylinders.

    e. Add a dynamic dForce modifier to the plane. Set Density to 2 in the Surfaces pane. (Optional) Set Contraction-Expansion ratio to 0.95 for a tighter fitting sash.

    f. Setup an animation with the figure moving forward into the mesh at frame 2 with the cylinders moving in towards the figure. At frame 4, move the cylinders further into the figure. The images show the movement of the cylinders before the simulation is run.

    Frame 2:                                                                        Frame 4:

      

    g. Run the simulation and the plane will wrap around the front half of the dress.

    h. Open the Geometry Editor and select a polygon in the middle of the sash. Right click in the viewport and select Geometry Assignment/Create Rigid Follow Node from Selected… This will add an I-beam icon as a child of the dress.

    i. Create a small cube and size it to be slightly taller than the sash.  Add subD so you can round the edges of the cube. Parent the cube to the i-beam icon.

    j. As the sash moves around, the cube will follow and stay at the same spot. Do not run a simulation with the buckle visible as it will cause the mesh to hang up and distort. After the simulation is completed, make it visible and if needed adjust rotation.

    k. This sash only goes halfway around the figure. Making a longer sash that goes all the way around is more complicated as you will need to have multiple steps to move the cylinders while keeping the mesh reasonably taut.  To get a smooth wrap you will also want to set Gravity to 0.

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    Post edited by RGcincy on
  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784
    edited May 2020

     

    84. The Problem with Buttons - Part 1.

    I have found you can use dForce on many older clothes as long as you set Bend Stiffness to 0.2 and reduce the Dynamic Strength on cuffs, collars, belts, pockets, buttons, and other ancillary items. It also helps if the poses are less dramatic (e.g., a walking pose versus a dynamic dance pose). Even with these surface parameter changes, buttons are oftentimes an issue and either wildly distort or end up in obvious out-of-place positions. This tutorial shows one method to deal with buttons.

    a. Load a figure and a wardrobe item with buttons. I’m using Men’s Shirt for Genesis 3 Females.

    b. Set up an animated timeline with the figure starting in an A or T pose at frame 0 and moving to a new pose at frame 20. I oftentimes use frame 10 for a new pose, but since there’s a lot of downward motion that imparts momentum, I find a slower descent is preferable with this pose.

    c. Add a dForce dynamic modifier to the shirt.

    d. Select the shirt and go to the Surfaces pane. You’ll find 8 surfaces. Default1 is the main shirt body. Select all the surfaces and set Bend Stiffness to 0.2. Leave Dynamic Strength at 1 for default1 and set all the other surfaces to a Dynamic Strength of 0.9. This means all will be affected by dForce but at a slower rate.

    e. Run the simulation. You will find the buttons distort and end up all over the place including the floor (highlighted in orange in the images).

     

    f. Set Dynamic Strength to 0 for the button and button2 surfaces. This means the buttons will not be modified by dForce but will still move with the rest of the shirt.

    g. Rerun the simulation. You will now see that the buttons are without distortion and are not scattered all about. But as the shadows in the render show, they are also not in the right positions (if you clear the dForce simulation, you will see that the buttons are located where they would be in the normal conforming state for the garment and pose).

       

    h. I was not able to find any combination of parameters that would keep the buttons intact and keep them in position. So I replaced the buttons and used rigid follow nodes to attach them to the shirt. The rest of this tutorial describes how to do that.

    i. First we need a button model. Instead of searching for a replacement, I use the one that comes with the shirt. It is not a separate object so we have to extract it from the shirt.

    j. Create a duplicate of the shirt leaving the original unmodified. Go to frame 0 so the figure is in an upright pose.

    k. Open the Geometry Editor. Choose Polygon as Selection Type. Right click in the viewport and select Marquee as Selection Mode.

    l. Select the shirt in the Scene pane. Draw a rectangle around one of the buttons (try for one that is mostly vertical to avoid issues later). Right-click and choose Geometry Selection/Invert Selection. Right-click and choose Geometry Editing/Delete Selected Polygons. You will be left with the button and a little bit of fabric.

    m. Select the fabric. You’ll probably find it easier to switch to Drag for Selection Mode. Click on a bit of fabric to select a polygon, type Ctrl+* to expand the selection, then delete those polygons. Repeat as needed until all fabric is gone.

    n. Hide everything in the scene pane other than the second shirt which now is nothing more than the button. From the main menu, choose Export and save as an .obj file with the name button. Select Convert To: as Daz Studio.

    o. Reverse the process and choose Import from the main menu and set From: to Daz Studio.

    p. Now we need to create spots to attach the buttons. There are 11 buttons on this shirt: 2 on each arm and 7 on the front of the shirt.

    q. Select the shirt and open the Geometry Editor. Click on the eye for the button and button2 surfaces to hide them.

    r. Next using Drag for Selection Mode find each button hole. I started with the uppermost button at the collar. Select a polygon in the middle of the hole and right click in the viewport and choose Geometry Assignment/Create Rigid Follow Node from Selected… This will add an I-beam icon as a child of the shirt. Give it a name 1.

    s. Repeat step r for each button hole going down the shirt. Then do the same for each button by the cuff. The location of each rigid node is indicated by the colored crossing lines. In the scene pane the shirt will have a large number of i-beam children.

      

     

    Continues in next post

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    Post edited by RGcincy on
  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784
    edited May 2020

     

    Continued from Previous Post

    84. The Problem with Buttons - Part 2 

    t. Select the button and create 10 instances. On the Scene pane, go to the pane menu (icon showing stack of horizontal lines) and verify Parent items in Place is not checked. Then drag a button instance and drop it on top of I-beam 1. Repeat for the other button instances and the original button as well. I change the name of the buttons to match the rigid node name.

     

    u. The buttons won’t be perfectly in place. Adjust each one’s rotation and XYZ position as needed. The image shows the results I ended up with in the default T-pose after adjustment. This is the worse part of creating new buttons as it can be tedious. Most shirts are not as bad as this one as they have fewer buttons. Only you can decide if an older non-dForce clothing item is worth it. But once done, you can save is and use it over and over.

    (click on images for larger sizes)

    v. For a faster and cleaner dForce simulation, hide all the buttons then run the simulation. As you can see, the buttons moved with the shirt and are mostly in the right positions. Adjust each one’s rotation and XYZ position as needed. The image shows what it looks like before any adjustments were made.

    w. There’s a couple issues with this shirt and pose. The downward movement caused the tips of the collar to bend up and the top of the pocket sags a bit. I added a weight map (below) to reduce the dynamic strength of those two areas (blue color). After rerunning the simulation and adjusting two buttons, here’s the final result (right).

    x. Here’s another pose after a few buttons are adjusted. 

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    Post edited by RGcincy on
  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784
    edited May 2020

     

    85. Sphere to Shirt - Part 1 

    This is a fun little exercise that shows how dForce can make something that looks odd into a decent-looking item of clothing. It’s also a good way to test out the effect of dForce parameters.

    a. Load a figure of your choice.

    b. Create a primitive sphere using the parameters shown in the image.

    c. Scale the sphere 128% in the Y-direction and 59% in the X then position it as shown.

    d. Open the Geometry Editor. Switch to Front view as it will give a clean selection of polygons. Right click in the viewport and choose Selection Mode/Marquee. Start near the left and drag to select polygons around the neck. Be sure at least one row in front of the neck is selected. Then right click in the viewport and choose Geometry Editing/Delete Selected Polygons.

    e. Repeat at the bottom of the sphere near the hips. Delete the selected polygons.

    f. Switch to Perspective view. Change Selection Mode to Drag. Left click and drag the mouse around the arm. If you release the button, hold down Ctrl key when next left clicking. Rotate the view so you can outline around the arm.

    g. Hide the figure and you will see the ring you selected. Hold down the Ctrl key, left click in the middle area and select all the polygons. Then delete the selection as you did for the top and bottom.

     

    h. Unlike Marquee selection, drag only selects visible polygons. Repeat steps f and g for the other arm.

    i. That’s it! Your dress is finished. Looks comfy, doesn’t it?

    j. Add a dynamic dForce modifier. Set up an animation timeline so the figure goes from the T or A pose to a standing pose. Run the simulation. Voila! It’s now a shirt or beach shift.

     

     

    (continued on next post)

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    Post edited by RGcincy on
  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784
    edited May 2020

     

    (continued from previous post)

    85. Sphere to Shirt - Part 2 

    k. Let’s explore how dForce surface parameters can affect the look.

    Density: Low values make for a stiffer fabric

    2                                                                                      25

       

    180 (default)                                                                   1000

       

    Contraction-Expansion Ratio: Values below 100 shrink and values above 100 grow the fabric

    60%                                                                                80%

       

    120%                                                                              140%

       

    Bend Stiffness at 0.01 Vary Stretch Stiffness: Causes fabric to get longer and wider so it slides off shoulder

    Stretch Stiffness

    0.8                                                                                   0.2

       

    0.1                                                                                   0.01

       

    Shear Stiffness: lower values causes lengthening, counteract with C-E ratio.

    0                                                                                      0 with Contraction-Expansion at 0.95

       

     

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    Post edited by RGcincy on
  • nonesuch00nonesuch00 Posts: 17,293
    RGcincy said:

     

    (continued from previous post)

    85. Sphere to Shirt - Part 2 

    k. Let’s explore how dForce surface parameters can affect the look.

    Density: Low values make for a stiffer fabric

    2                                                                                      25

       

    180 (default)                                                                   1000

       

    Contraction-Expansion Ratio: Values below 100 shrink and values above 100 grow the fabric

    60%                                                                                80%

       

    120%                                                                              140%

       

    Bend Stiffness at 0.01 Vary Stretch Stiffness: Causes fabric to get longer and wider so it slides off shoulder

    Stretch Stiffness

    0.8                                                                                   0.2

       

    0.1                                                                                   0.01

       

    Shear Stiffness: lower values causes lengthening, counteract with C-E ratio.

    0                                                                                      0 with Contraction-Expansion at 0.95

       

     

    awesome

  • maikdeckermaikdecker Posts: 2,635
    RGcincy said:

    (continued from previous post)

    85. Sphere to Shirt - Part 2 

    k. Let’s explore how dForce surface parameters can affect the look.

    Thanks for this great explanation of the effects for different settings :)

  • barbultbarbult Posts: 20,295
    RGcincy said:

    (continued from previous post)

    85. Sphere to Shirt - Part 2 

    k. Let’s explore how dForce surface parameters can affect the look.

    Thanks for this great explanation of the effects for different settings :)

    Yes, that is really helpful. Density is opposite of what I expected. I thought a higher density would be stiffer.
  • Wow, thank you. This document is the bomb! 

  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784

    Wow, thank you. This document is the bomb! 

    Thanks! If you have any questions, just ask

  • Hello!

    Sorry if this question has been asked before.

    I'm relatively new to the dForce ecosystem, but not too much on the dynamic aspect of clothings.
    I'm working with a pair of panties that are dForce. Loaded in a scene I move them and place them so that the hip part hangs from the chair and let the simulation do it's job in curving the rest down.

    Only problem is that both hips parts remain stiff like a board while the rest simulate accordingly.
    I did check in the surface about the Dynamics Strenght setting and it all set to 1 on all surfaces. It feels like there is a single hard point in the mesh that doesn't allow the cloth to fully flex or bent. It's like there is an invisible force holding it in shape and up.

    Any idea what that could be?

    Oh and I did read the guide already, trying to see if there was something to do with the New Push Modifier Weight Node ... but so far, empty handed here :(

     

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  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784

    A few thoughts come to mind:

    1. If there is already a weight map (it will be a child of the item in the scene pane), click on it in the scene pane and go to Tool Settings/Node Weight Map Brush. Check to see if the problem area is bluish or gray and if so, use the weight brush to add influence weight.

    2. There may be a hidden weight map. Add a dForce weight node and then go to Tool Settings/Node Weight Map Brush. That will unhide the map. You can then check to see if that area is bluish or gray and if so, use the weight brush to add influence weight.

    3. If the hip parts are embedded in the surface of the figure, that can lock it in place. Set scale to 101-105% at frame 0 on the timeline then back to 100% at frame 5 and run an animated simulation. 

     

  • RGcincy said:

    A few thoughts come to mind:

    1. If there is already a weight map (it will be a child of the item in the scene pane), click on it in the scene pane and go to Tool Settings/Node Weight Map Brush. Check to see if the problem area is bluish or gray and if so, use the weight brush to add influence weight.

    2. There may be a hidden weight map. Add a dForce weight node and then go to Tool Settings/Node Weight Map Brush. That will unhide the map. You can then check to see if that area is bluish or gray and if so, use the weight brush to add influence weight.

    3. If the hip parts are embedded in the surface of the figure, that can lock it in place. Set scale to 101-105% at frame 0 on the timeline then back to 100% at frame 5 and run an animated simulation. 

     

    Its was Number 2 ... hidden by the layout of my UI.

    I had to reset it completely cause a crap ton of options where hidden from me and I was circling around and around like an idiot for nothing:)

  • Hello guys!
    I am a recent user of DAZ STUDIO and as such only an apprentice. I started trying to learn the essentials of Dforce with the video "Powerful dForce Discoveries and Solutions" by RGcincy but I only tried it because I was stuck right away, this is because, despite following the tutorial strictly, my simulations react completely different from what would be supposed. I tried to change all kinds of parameters to find out what was wrong but I can't find out. My closest approximation is the last video that I will post in which I had to change the Collision Offset parameter of plane 1 to 2.00 and even with the minimum Friction value for both planes, it didn't slide completely!
    I'm using version 4.12.0.86 Pro Edition (64 bit) of DAZ and my processor is an AMD Ryzen 3900X and the graphics card is an AMD Radeon RX 590 series which leaves me with only the option to use "AMD Acellerated parallel processing Ellesmere "as an Opencl device on the Advanced tab of simulation settings.
    I ask someone to give me a little help, because I can't find out what's wrong!
    I leave here the links to the videos of my simulations!
    https://mega.nz/file/rQRADYAA#yxiZyq-RyvuEGklj_ZEMRjuCSpP3ianZ5sno7jyhoDs

    https://mega.nz/file/aJBGCa7b#0ovyuPFDnjgKVHroe5Y63fUu5IEH4YCo2rrw5ReSqf0

    https://mega.nz/file/LUI02ABR#lq97zI3CMDvBPyNMFZ-YM7ZmPuhFyhOGbGOMScuiXsc

    RGcincy, any idea what it might be?
    I apologize for wasting your time with me!
    Thank you!

  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784
    edited September 2020

    Looks odd. How many polygons does the green plane have? and the red plane? It looks like the falling plane is intersecting the lower one and either passing through or getting stuck. Usually for planes involved in dForce, I use 40-100 as the number of divisions. The calculations are based on the vertices and so a plane of only one division only has 4 vertices so sometimes things slip through. 

    Post edited by RGcincy on
  • Anyone familiar with AMD processors and graphics cards will be able to tell me if they have, have had or have no problem doing DFORCE simulations.
    I use an AMD processor together with an AMD graphics card and i only have "AMD Acellerated parallel processing Ellesmere" as an Opencl device option on the Advanced tab of simulation settings.
    My simulations react abnormally! Has anyone had the same problem?
    Thank you!

  • TirickTirick Posts: 218

    I have an AMD laptop with a GPU embedded CPU as well as a desktop with a dedicated Nvidia GPU and an AMD CPU. Both behave more or less the same with dForce, although the dedicated GPU perfoms the calculations faster. 'Better' is subjective. The simulation is at its root just math. As far as I know, it does not require an Nvidia card to operate (unlike Iray, for example). 

    When I get odd exploding meshes it is the simulation setup that appears to have the most effect. Make sure your mesh is cohesive and that there no internal collisions between objects before starting the simulation, and remove anything not a part of the simulation. Start simple, a plane mesh and a sphere mesh, enable dforce on the plane and test. Complex forms, especially involving figures or posing, invariably requires fiddling with settings and mesh parameters. 

    If a simple setup is causing odd issues, then look to a driver update or even a reinstall.

    I'm no expert, but I've converted a lot of meshes to dforce by just playing around. Sometimes you need to remove the weight from parts of the cloth to get it to behave. You can to this to pin parts on some items that are not designed well for deforce (unjoined meshes, for example).

  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784
    Tirick said:

    If a simple setup is causing odd issues, then look to a driver update or even a reinstall.

    That's a good point. Some drivers have given problems with dForce. 

  • This is all excellent, thank you OP, it's very much appreciated

  • RGcincyRGcincy Posts: 2,784

    You're welcome!

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