Carrara Academy for Light of Heaven

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  • SadKitty_CarraraSadKitty_Carrara Posts: 22,014
    edited December 1969

    it will not go splat unless you add softbody in modifiers and then only more of a cloth, deflated balloon to jelly effect depending on the parameters.
    you can also add a value under the physics setting for initial velocity and direction.

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited December 1969

    Could you look at my scene and tell me what IU'm getting wrong? The sphere only seems to fall binstead of fly at the wall.

    https://dl.dropbox.com/u/106879025/splat.car

  • SadKitty_CarraraSadKitty_Carrara Posts: 22,014
    edited December 1969

    I need to leave for work soon
    but
    initial look

    make your floor plane bigger so it goes under the sphere
    increase friction and density on all, maybe bounce
    point your directional force the direction you want to throw it
    angular velocity needs to be on y axis, try about 30 or more degrees
    add initial velocity of say -100 to y axis
    in physics settings under scene try lower collision distance, higher settings for accuracy

    play with your soft body settings
    I get deflated ballons, bouncy balls with wobble so far, still trying but need to leave soon

  • SadKitty_CarraraSadKitty_Carrara Posts: 22,014
    edited December 1969

    will admt I find going splat dropping easier
    you can do that, convert to keyframes and rotate the scene.

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited December 1969

    Thanks. So, it was falling because there was no floor under it, right?

    And yeah, I agree that drop-splat sounds easier. I wanted to experiment with forces though. Will play with what you gave me.

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited December 1969

    Well, I made it go splat. When it splats, it just falls on the floor and looks like poop or something. lol How do you make it slide down the wall slowly?

  • SadKitty_CarraraSadKitty_Carrara Posts: 22,014
    edited December 1969

    Andy!!!
    please help Jacob get his poopy poo more slithery! %-P

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited December 1969

    What? And I thought Wendy ws the animation expert. :P j/p

  • SadKitty_CarraraSadKitty_Carrara Posts: 22,014
    edited December 1969

    I would experiment around with it, adding particles that only start emitting upon splat point etc,
    only thing I have done is a tomato splatting and I did that for that, but it only had to fall to the ground.

  • 3DAGE3DAGE Posts: 3,301
    edited September 2012

    HI All :)

    Firstly, I agree with Wendy,. experimenting with stuff is one of the best ways to learn how and when to use different tools or features, like particles emitting when the object hit's the wall.

    Since this is a Physics simulation,.. to get the object to slide down the wall, after impact, you'll need to look at what forces are effecting it, (what's holding it there, and what's forcing it to drop)

    I'd also suggest switching off the default scene gravity, and replacing it with a direction force, pointing down, (to create a "fake gravity")since the direction force strength can be animated and key-framed which gives you more control than the "Default" scene gravity.

    It's also important to figure out if a physics simulation is the best way to create what you want to happen. (instead of simulating what would happen)

    If you want a ball bouncing realistically,.. then it should be easy to simulate that using physics,.

    If you want a tomato splatting into a wall, and then "slowly" sliding down it,.... It may be simpler, and easier to control the motion by animating it, instead of trying to accurately simulate it through physics.

    Try throwing a few tomatoes against a wall and see how many will burst, but bounce off,.. or drop to the floor,.. instead of sliding slowly down..

    It is possible to use some elements of BOTH physics and animation, by simulating the Physics of an object hitting a surface, then converting that motion into key-frames,..which you can then adjust and delete as you need. but you can't run the physics again, after it's been converted to key-frames, unless you delete all the key-frames and start again.

    You should experiment with key-framing the forces which effect the object,.. (if there are no forces effecting it,. It'll float in Zero-Gravity )

    Hope it helps :)

    Post edited by 3DAGE on
  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited December 1969

    I was actually experimenting with particle emitters until I got stuck and couldn't figure out what the problem was (page 2). But yeah, I have been doing a bunch of experimenting on this and that, so I've been both learning and running into walls.

    So, I guess you could say this splatting thing is how I feel. :P "Weeeeee --" SPLAT! :D

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited December 1969

    I'm just playing with stuff now. I tried a particle emitter and a directional force pointed up. What exactly does this force do? Because my particles only spread out on the floor.

  • JaderailJaderail Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Does not the UP force have a setting? So you can Push the particles? If not you might need to add Physic's to the UP force with a trigger for when they happen.

    And this from a person who does not use Carrara.

  • SadKitty_CarraraSadKitty_Carrara Posts: 22,014
    edited December 1969

    the particle need to be
    free in the scene, subject to forces etc under the advanced settings
    you can also specify which forces affect them

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited December 1969

    @Jeff: That might be the problem. I don't know. It didn't look like Di\mension Theory used any Physics in the free scene files I picked up. I'll have to double check.

    @Wendy: I did do that.

  • JaderailJaderail Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    the particle need to be
    free in the scene, subject to forces etc under the advanced settings
    you can also specify which forces affect them
    Hmmm... So for a fountain the Base would have say forces pushing the particles up and away from it (the Force set to fall off at distance) then the Gravity FORCE would effect them to bring them down once the base force fell off enough. Is that close?
  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited December 1969

    I just opened DT's free fountain scene and looked at it. To me, it doesn't look like a water spraying fountain. More like a paper fountain. lol.

    It uses four particle emitters and two point forces. No Physics. Hmmmm...

    What is the difference between point and directional forces?

  • 3DAGE3DAGE Posts: 3,301
    edited December 1969

    HI All :)

    Particles can either use the "default" Particles gravity settings (see pic) , or they can use the gravity and any othr forcces in the scene, or just a single force.

    to answer Jaderails question, (great example BTW) :)

    the particles are emitted with an initial "Velocity" which can be adjusted, and there's also a "dispersion angle" setting which can produce anything from a single stream of particles, or a Spray of particles in all directions, like an explosion,.. So, the initial velocity forces the particles into the air,
    Then Gravity slows them down and pulls them back to the floor.

    In the example of Fire and smoke particles, you would set the particles (own) gravity to something like 0:0:4, instead of the default 0:0:-10, and adjust the initial velocity to something like 4ft per sec.

    This will make the particles rise in the scene, instead of falling to the floor.

    When you add a particle system, it's default setting, is to use it's own gravity settings, and fall down until reaching the "0" level in the scene (floor level) even if there's no floor object.
    If the particles meet any objects, there's no collision.

    To enable particles to use other forces in the scene (including the default scene gravity) you need to enable those options in the Particle editor (Advanced section) See pic.

    You can select specific forces (shift+select to add / remove multiple forces) which will effect the particles.

    Hope it helps :)

    particle_forces_setup.jpg
    457 x 761 - 66K
  • JaderailJaderail Posts: 0
    edited September 2012

    Okay I see the Local Gravity (OWN) part but where is the FORCE set? And why set that check box?

    Post edited by Jaderail on
  • 3DAGE3DAGE Posts: 3,301
    edited December 1969

    The difference between Point , and Directional forces.

    The Direction force is Constant force in a single direction. (although the values and direction can be animated)

    The Point force is an all directional force from a single point in space ,... whether that's an Explosion (positive force) or a Black hole (negative force) everything is either forced away from a single point, or drawn towards it.

    The Strength and falloff areas of the forces can be adjusted to create key-frames so you can animate a strong explosion which quickly fades. or a direction force which varies in strength, or direction.

    :)

  • JaderailJaderail Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Bite me Andy, I'm still lost.

  • 3DAGE3DAGE Posts: 3,301
    edited December 1969

    HI Jaderail :)

    The forces option is just below the (local gravity) settings, it's an option if you want to use forces you've added to the scene, instead of the Local gravity.

    :)

  • JaderailJaderail Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    OH!! I get it, For the Fountain example it would require both to be set. Correct?

  • 3DAGE3DAGE Posts: 3,301
    edited December 1969

    For the fountain, you need the initial velocity, and the dispersion angle,. plus a gravity or directional force to slow the particles and pull them back to the floor, that force could either be the particles own (default ) local gravity,.. or other forces you've added to the scene.

    :)

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited September 2012

    I played wih it some more. I found that if you check the box to allow forces and add a D-Force, the particles just float there. But uncheck it and use 0-0-40, they blast into space.

    What am I overlooking?

    Post edited by MAJourney on
  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited December 1969

    I just tried a primgitive plane and a torque force to see if it does what I rthink it does. Spin like a fan. But BNO, g,it didn't do squat.

    So yeah, I think i'm doing something wrong.

  • 3DAGE3DAGE Posts: 3,301
    edited December 1969

    HI LOH :)

    For the issue with particles and forces,.
    What you describe should be working,. If you have a force in the scene, and a particle emitter enabled to use the forces in the scene, then those particles should be effected by the forces,.. Remember that there's the "default" Scene Gravity, which, in this case may be working against the direction force you've added,..
    You can select a Specific force for the particles to use (in the particle editor),. or you can disable the Default scene gravity in the Physics tab.


    For the Plane and torque force,..
    The plane's motion needs to be set to Physics, and you need to run the simulation. you'll also need to add a constraint to the plane, to stop it simply falling through space.

    Try adding a Cube primitive,. and a "Ball joint" constraint. along with the torque force, you'll probably need to adjust the force strength to get the effect you want.

    :)

  • BlumBlumShubBlumBlumShub Posts: 1,102
    edited December 1969

    With Carrara I know I can set up soft-body physics, but to be honest I don't know what limitations there are for this kind of system as I've never played with it.

    Let's say I want to make it look like someone is asleep on a bed... Could I set up the soft-body goodness to make it look like the body of the human is soft, and the mesh of the bed is soft, so that the human squishes appropriately and he/she sinks into the soft cuddly mattress properly? And how easy is it to set that kind of thing up?

    Thanks :D
    Barry

  • 3DAGE3DAGE Posts: 3,301
    edited December 1969

    HI Barry :)

    Soft-body is still pretty limited, (but it can be a lot of fun) ..But,.. as far as applying soft-body to a figure like V4, it's a no no,

    Soft-body can be used to simulate anything that's soft, like Jelly, or a ball hitting a wall :) but figures are more complex meshes with different parts, like the Eyes, eyelashes and the figure also has bones which influence the mesh (weight mapping) which is technically a deforming force, PLUS,.. you would still want to be able to animate the figure using key-frames, and right now,.. an object can't be both key-framed and physics simulated.... it's either one or the other.

    The eyes for example, are made of different objects like the cornea, and in Gen 4 figures, there's also an eye surface, and if you applied physics to that it would explode, since all the surfaces are touching. and the collision detection would force them apart

    Another option would be to Pose the figure,. then export as an OBJect, in that pose, (which gets rid of all the bones) then load that Object back into the scene, and apply physics soft-body, ..but what you'd get is a floppy bag, since there's nothing inside the figure, it would collapse, depending on the soft-body settings you use.

    But,... don't despair :)

    Your example of a figure deforming a bed or sofa ... is possible in Carrara. and it's possible without using physics :)

    You can add "Magnets" to the figure, which can be set up to deform another object, so,. when the figure sits down, the magnet force will deform the other object. .EG:..bed / sofa / pillow,... etc.

    Johnnybravo 2000 did a couple of Tutorial vids on using magnets in carrara a while ago, ... but I can't find em now :(

    hope that males some sense :)

  • MAJourneyMAJourney Posts: 1,284
    edited December 1969

    But iuf you apply soft-body to V4 and drop a big cube on her, wouldn't that result in a Loony Tunes-style flat Vicky?

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