DazPeople would like to see tutorials at dazshop - teach people 3d character creation! (call to al C

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  • anikadanikad Posts: 1,913
    edited December 1969

    New tutorial in the store
    The Basics of Lighting by blondie9999
    http://www.daz3d.com/shop/new-releases/the-basics-of-lighting

  • KharmaKharma Posts: 2,388
    edited December 1969

    Thanks for posting links to all this info. I would like to learn how to make my own characters props etc and am open to any help anytime :)

  • cesar_monroycesar_monroy Posts: 15
    edited December 1969

    While I see your points and agree this would be a great thing for customers and aspiring creators, look at the other side. If a vendor relies on creating DS/Poser to make a living, the last thing they would probably want is to share their workflow and secrets because it would hurt their income. This market is really small and the last thing needed for a vendor is any competition.

    If anything, DAZ should be the ones to publish any tutorials since more vendors is a win/win for them.

    The last thing needed for a vendor is any competition? Maybe this is the reason their market share is way too small. Knowing how to do something does not mean: a) you want to do it and/or b) what you do has enough quality as to be marketed.

    Using Maya or even Cinema 4D, I can create a human figure, rig it and animate it in less than an hour, and I suppose that if I were willing to spend a few days refining the mesh, I could create something beautiful that could be sold elsewhere. Yet, even if I know how to make a complete a character, I still buy them from specialized vendors and the reason is simple: time is money. Let's say that I've found how valuable is my time and I also happen to know how much time would it take me to do something; hence, it is easy for me to see when something is valued way below or above its price. This, in case you didn't know, is called "consumer awareness".

    I, for one, would like to know how to set up my characters so I can use DAZ clothes and props. So, I do think we need more tutorials and yes, many more content providers, as I'm kind of tired of seeing the same unrealistic hair styles, clothes and shoes... Just once, I would like to find a complete set of clothing that doesn't look trashy.

  • SickleYieldSickleYield Posts: 6,938
    edited December 1969

    While I see your points and agree this would be a great thing for customers and aspiring creators, look at the other side. If a vendor relies on creating DS/Poser to make a living, the last thing they would probably want is to share their workflow and secrets because it would hurt their income. This market is really small and the last thing needed for a vendor is any competition.

    If anything, DAZ should be the ones to publish any tutorials since more vendors is a win/win for them.

    The last thing needed for a vendor is any competition? Maybe this is the reason their market share is way too small. Knowing how to do something does not mean: a) you want to do it and/or b) what you do has enough quality as to be marketed.

    Using Maya or even Cinema 4D, I can create a human figure, rig it and animate it in less than an hour, and I suppose that if I were willing to spend a few days refining the mesh, I could create something beautiful that could be sold elsewhere. Yet, even if I know how to make a complete a character, I still buy them from specialized vendors and the reason is simple: time is money. Let's say that I've found how valuable is my time and I also happen to know how much time would it take me to do something; hence, it is easy for me to see when something is valued way below or above its price. This, in case you didn't know, is called "consumer awareness".

    I, for one, would like to know how to set up my characters so I can use DAZ clothes and props. So, I do think we need more tutorials and yes, many more content providers, as I'm kind of tired of seeing the same unrealistic hair styles, clothes and shoes... Just once, I would like to find a complete set of clothing that doesn't look trashy.

    Having more vendors won't change the factors that result in those items predominating. It's been explained and argued to death, so I'm not going into it again. What I wanted to say was:

    I'm never averse to sharing information, and in fact do so a great deal on my deviantart. Sometimes people contact me via PM with questions, and I happily answer those, too. I am not the only PA of whom this is true. And there are paid tutorials as well.

    It's not a question of "can an aspiring creator find the information?" It's a question of "are they willing to put in the effort, and can they afford the startup time to producing quality content?"

    The second and third points are what keep people out of doing this for a living, not the first one. it can be challenging and tedious. Some people are already in a full time job to support a family and don't have the energy to take this on as a second one (very understandable). Some people are stopped by interfaces or tutorial formats, in which case 3d is not a good career for them in general. Some people can't afford the hardware startup cost, which can be high.

    Take a look at this thread:

    http://www.daz3d.com/forums/discussion/42075/

    This guy is running into some obstacles, but he isn't giving up. I don't see that kind of attitude very often, which is why you see me continuing to try to help him. (Also, some of the problems he's having are down to me not being that great at writing tutorials; you should all be grateful that the people selling commercial ones are much better at it than I am.)

  • CausamCausam Posts: 7
    Mattymanx said:

    Only problem I see with attempting an "All-In-One" tutorial is that no two people do things the same way. I have spent most of August watching Hexagon tutorials by different people and differnt people do things different ways to accomplish the same goal.

    There is a lot of information to be considered when doing any part of content creation. Speaking just from the stand point of converting models for use in DS and Poser and having written a 14 page tutorial on that, I can tell you that you cannot include everything or go over everything.

    There needs to be very specific tutorials covering certain subjects in great detail and nothing else without diving into other areas or the end user will be left with a lot more questions. And what is the point of providing a tutorial when the people who get it are going to come back with more questions then before.

    This also begs the question, why pay for it when there are already countless tutorials all over the internet covering differnt programs and how to use them?

    If anyone wants to make content in any fashion, then start searching. Expecting anyone to provide exactly what you need or want to making your own from start to finish is like expecting a professional photographer to reveal ALL their secrets.

    But regardless, I'll go back to my first comment. People do things differently, think differently, respond in differnt manners. So whats good for the goose is not good for the gander.

    And speaking of tutorials...

    3D Model Conversions
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/?adtf0812j6py43i

    Dealing with Zipped Poser Content
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/?oqcf29kmigzd3gk

    While this is an old post, it is spot on.  There is no substitute for rolling up your sleeves.  In my years of playing around with 3D, I have learned the following general workflow:

    1) Model the character.  DAZ is NOT a modeling program, although you can get a very good head start by loading a basic character and exporting it to a modelling program. 

    2) Texture the character. This involves UV mapping and then a LOT of work in Photoshop, GIMP or similar. 

    3) Rig the character.  If we're talking DAZ, this means importing the model and textures back into DAZ.  Be aware that you will have to reexport and reimport many times in order to get just the basics to work. 

    Here's one ramble-rant on exactly the sort of thing that prevents any 'all-in-one' tutorial from being possible:

    ANIMATION?  Forget it in DAZ.  It's basically broken when compared to other programs like Blender (awesome because you can apply physics of every kind but it is a STEEP learning curve).  There are other much "easier" to use programs out there.  They are very expensive and when you get right down to it, they have no more power than Blender.  But here's the catch:  DAZ rigs are specific to DAZ.  You can rig a character easily in Blender, but it will not conform to DAZ rigging.  Another catch is that if you decide to get clever and export an obj file into Blender from DAZ and expect to be able to simply apply a human metarig, get ready for a rude surprise -- you have hours and hours of mesh "fixing" to do before the metarig will work.  This is because DAZ leaves lots of mesh open.  An example is eyealshes. Another example is toenails.  etc etc etc.  You have to get down into the mesh and close these objects in such a way the the automatic weight painting in the metarig will deform the character in a realistic way.  The upside is that you can use a number of tools to apply motion capture files to your character.
    But what's the point?  After all of that work, you have something that works for animation in Blender and can be very well rendered, but it's not compatible with anything else.  All of these platforms have their bugaboos and standards, and they are generally speaking mutually exclusive.

    I hope some of this helps vis-a-vis opening your eyes to the learning curve. 

  •  

    FSMCDesigns said:

    While I see your points and agree this would be a great thing for customers and aspiring creators, look at the other side. If a vendor relies on creating DS/Poser to make a living, the last thing they would probably want is to share their workflow and secrets because it would hurt their income. This market is really small and the last thing needed for a vendor is any competition.

     

    If anything, DAZ should be the ones to publish any tutorials since more vendors is a win/win for them.

     

    The last thing needed for a vendor is any competition? Maybe this is the reason their market share is way too small. Knowing how to do something does not mean: a) you want to do it and/or b) what you do has enough quality as to be marketed.

    Using Maya or even Cinema 4D, I can create a human figure, rig it and animate it in less than an hour, and I suppose that if I were willing to spend a few days refining the mesh, I could create something beautiful that could be sold elsewhere. Yet, even if I know how to make a complete a character, I still buy them from specialized vendors and the reason is simple: time is money. Let's say that I've found how valuable is my time and I also happen to know how much time would it take me to do something; hence, it is easy for me to see when something is valued way below or above its price. This, in case you didn't know, is called "consumer awareness".

    I, for one, would like to know how to set up my characters so I can use DAZ clothes and props. So, I do think we need more tutorials and yes, many more content providers, as I'm kind of tired of seeing the same unrealistic hair styles, clothes and shoes... Just once, I would like to find a complete set of clothing that doesn't look trashy.

    It has nothing to do with whether the PAs here do or don't want competition, it's that the people that choose to create tutorials to sell in many cases choose not to offer them for sale at DAZ3D, but instead at one of the other stores.

  • NovicaNovica Posts: 17,053

    There are also lots of tutorials on CG at http://www.cgdreams.co.uk/free.html also using Hexagon and ZBrush.

    The site is run by 'tez' who used to post on the Hexagon forums here. He does character modelling as well.

    That page is now a 404 not found. (so link should be removed :)   ) 

  • DivamakeupDivamakeup Posts: 5,059
    edited October 22
    Causam said:
    Mattymanx said:

    Only problem I see with attempting an "All-In-One" tutorial is that no two people do things the same way. I have spent most of August watching Hexagon tutorials by different people and differnt people do things different ways to accomplish the same goal.

    There is a lot of information to be considered when doing any part of content creation. Speaking just from the stand point of converting models for use in DS and Poser and having written a 14 page tutorial on that, I can tell you that you cannot include everything or go over everything.

    There needs to be very specific tutorials covering certain subjects in great detail and nothing else without diving into other areas or the end user will be left with a lot more questions. And what is the point of providing a tutorial when the people who get it are going to come back with more questions then before.

    This also begs the question, why pay for it when there are already countless tutorials all over the internet covering differnt programs and how to use them?

    If anyone wants to make content in any fashion, then start searching. Expecting anyone to provide exactly what you need or want to making your own from start to finish is like expecting a professional photographer to reveal ALL their secrets.

    But regardless, I'll go back to my first comment. People do things differently, think differently, respond in differnt manners. So whats good for the goose is not good for the gander.

    And speaking of tutorials...

    3D Model Conversions
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/?adtf0812j6py43i

    Dealing with Zipped Poser Content
    http://www.mediafire.com/view/?oqcf29kmigzd3gk

    While this is an old post, it is spot on.  There is no substitute for rolling up your sleeves.  In my years of playing around with 3D, I have learned the following general workflow:

    1) Model the character.  DAZ is NOT a modeling program, although you can get a very good head start by loading a basic character and exporting it to a modelling program. 

    2) Texture the character. This involves UV mapping and then a LOT of work in Photoshop, GIMP or similar. 

    3) Rig the character.  If we're talking DAZ, this means importing the model and textures back into DAZ.  Be aware that you will have to reexport and reimport many times in order to get just the basics to work. 

    Here's one ramble-rant on exactly the sort of thing that prevents any 'all-in-one' tutorial from being possible:

    ANIMATION?  Forget it in DAZ.  It's basically broken when compared to other programs like Blender (awesome because you can apply physics of every kind but it is a STEEP learning curve).  There are other much "easier" to use programs out there.  They are very expensive and when you get right down to it, they have no more power than Blender.  But here's the catch:  DAZ rigs are specific to DAZ.  You can rig a character easily in Blender, but it will not conform to DAZ rigging.  Another catch is that if you decide to get clever and export an obj file into Blender from DAZ and expect to be able to simply apply a human metarig, get ready for a rude surprise -- you have hours and hours of mesh "fixing" to do before the metarig will work.  This is because DAZ leaves lots of mesh open.  An example is eyealshes. Another example is toenails.  etc etc etc.  You have to get down into the mesh and close these objects in such a way the the automatic weight painting in the metarig will deform the character in a realistic way.  The upside is that you can use a number of tools to apply motion capture files to your character.
    But what's the point?  After all of that work, you have something that works for animation in Blender and can be very well rendered, but it's not compatible with anything else.  All of these platforms have their bugaboos and standards, and they are generally speaking mutually exclusive.

    I hope some of this helps vis-a-vis opening your eyes to the learning curve. 

    I wish one could texture in just Photoshop or Gimp. But, unless I'm wrong, it doesn't texture across seams. So unless you have a very flat or toon type texture, or relying really heavily on a merchant resource, I'm not sure if there is a way to do it totally in Photoshop or gimp. But then again, I have an old version of Photoshop, so maybe they've made major advancements in 3D texturing since my version. :)

    Post edited by Divamakeup on
  • Joe CotterJoe Cotter Posts: 3,162

    Photoshop 5 Extended and beyond (not sure about current cloud but guessing so) have an entire menu for 3D which includes 3D paint. You can import a model, paint on it in 3D and export the texture maps.

  • Sixus1 Media just released a couple of tutorials for character creation.

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