3D Comic Book Tips And Pictures

1333435363739»

Comments

  • FirstBastionFirstBastion Posts: 6,006
    edited August 10

    3Diva said:

    Here's the first episode of one of my comics, if anyone is interested in checking it out. :)

    I'm open to feedback. It's already uploaded on Webtoons as a part of a contest, so I can't do any edits to it this late. But I'll keep any critique or feedback in mind for any future episodes.

    https://www.daz3d.com/forums/uploads/FileUpload/26/bf0f84bc9b9b0bec54c19372de1ec4.jpg

    (Sorry for the low res, I couldn't get the higher res version to load as an attachment.)

     Sixteen panels before the first establishing shot,  and by then we were already invested in the plight of the main characters,  and would follow their story regardless where it was happening... Just sayin'  Always focus on characters and their conflicts.  Please give the webtoons link.

    Post edited by FirstBastion on
  • csaacsaa Posts: 406

    FirstBastion said:

     Sixteen panels before the first establishing shot,  and by then we were already invested in the plight of the main characters,  and would follow their story regardless where it was happening... Just sayin'  Always focus on characters and their conflicts.  Please give the webtoons link.

    FirstBastion,

    I agree on the need to establish character and context early on but I think 3Diva handled it well. Keep in mind that the webtoons format is meant for reading on mobile devices. Unlike comics in book format, the images are laid out strictly in linear sequence; there's no chance for the eye to zig-zag over a spread and grasp the gestalt of the scene. The overall effect? The story appears to take longer to unwind, increasing the urgency to scroll forward -- potentially, upping the reader's impatience. (It's not just with webtoons though. You could argue that overall the web conspires to "hurry up" our consumption of information. Alas! 'Tis the end of civilization as we know it. laugh) With creative layout, sixteen panels could easily fit into a two-page spread. So that's not so bad a pace before the first establishing shot. Besides, storytelling in medias res never really went out of style. It just asks the reader to keep more details in mind while the narrative timeline reels through a long flashback sequence.

    Cheers!

  • FirstBastionFirstBastion Posts: 6,006
    edited August 10

    Exactly @3Diva did an excellent job on focusing on the characters and the conflict. Earlier in the discussion we were considering  how important an establishing shot is, and whether or not it is important to add one early on. 3Diva just showed a perfect example where the establihing shot after the initial scene works too. There are lots of option in storytelling.

    Post edited by FirstBastion on
  • 3Diva3Diva Posts: 11,235
    edited August 11

    Linwelly said:

    @3Diva are you participating in the call to action contest on webtoons? leave a link to we can find it, this is looking very cool, the only little critique I got is that when She's hangin on her arm her body weigth would pull her sideways so that the shoulder axis is more angling towards the floor. You can achive the effect quite nicely using active pose and pulling on the limp upwards (soem corrections afterwards will be needed)

    also I totally agree on recommending Making Comics by Scott McCloud

    good luck with the challenge!

    Thank you! If/when I do someone hanging again I'll try and give it a bit more of a physically accurate hang. The "active pose" trick sounds very helpful - I'll have to remember that one! Thank you, Linwelly!

    It is the Call to Action Contest. Here's the link to my entry: https://www.webtoons.com/en/challenge/humane-harvest/list?title_no=772089 (Note that links to specific comics on that website almost ALWAYS redirects you to the front page instead of to the comic the first time the link is clicked, so you'll likely have to click the link twice to get to the comic.) 

    Post edited by 3Diva on
  • 3Diva3Diva Posts: 11,235
    edited August 11

    FirstBastion said:

    Exactly @3Diva did an excellent job on focusing on the characters and the conflict. Earlier in the discussion we were considering  how important an establishing shot is, and whether or not it is important to add one early on. 3Diva just showed a perfect example where the establihing shot after the initial scene works too. There are lots of option in storytelling.

    Thank you! That's very nice of you to say! As for the establishing shot - I hope it wasn't too jarring to make it come a little bit later. I felt this was very necessary due to the limitations of the contest of which this episode is an entry for. The contest's theme and upload file size limitations made me have to go outside the way I would normally write a comic. The Call to Action contest's focus is on action, so it needed more action than I had originally scripted. And I couldn't start with an establishing shot because if I had shown the neighborhood at that point, it would have given away something that wasn't meant to be revealed until a bit later in the episode. :)

    The original script I had for this comic had it start with the opening shot of the neighborhood and the reader getting to know the characters a little more before things got heavy, but was advised that, due to the contest's theme, it would be best to start with some action. So I made some tweaks to the script and started with a flashback. 

    Thank you for the sweet comment and the feedback! It's much appreciated! 

    Post edited by 3Diva on
  • 3Diva3Diva Posts: 11,235
    edited August 11

    csaa said:

    FirstBastion said:

     Sixteen panels before the first establishing shot,  and by then we were already invested in the plight of the main characters,  and would follow their story regardless where it was happening... Just sayin'  Always focus on characters and their conflicts.  Please give the webtoons link.

    FirstBastion,

    I agree on the need to establish character and context early on but I think 3Diva handled it well. Keep in mind that the webtoons format is meant for reading on mobile devices. Unlike comics in book format, the images are laid out strictly in linear sequence; there's no chance for the eye to zig-zag over a spread and grasp the gestalt of the scene. The overall effect? The story appears to take longer to unwind, increasing the urgency to scroll forward -- potentially, upping the reader's impatience. (It's not just with webtoons though. You could argue that overall the web conspires to "hurry up" our consumption of information. Alas! 'Tis the end of civilization as we know it. laugh) With creative layout, sixteen panels could easily fit into a two-page spread. So that's not so bad a pace before the first establishing shot. Besides, storytelling in medias res never really went out of style. It just asks the reader to keep more details in mind while the narrative timeline reels through a long flashback sequence.

    Cheers!

    I'm glad you thought it was handled well. I was worried that starting with the action would be too jarring for people. I had to make some tweaks to the original script I had for the comic. I was told due to the contest's theme that starting with action would probably be best, so I started with a flashback. And due to the file upload limitation for the contest, I wasn't able to spend as much time as I wanted getting to know the characters before things got a bit chaotic, but I do hope that I included enough to help the audience to care some about what happens to the characters.

    Thank you for your comments and the support! I really appreciate it! And you're right, web comic layout is a totally different beast. The original script and storyboarding for the comic was in a "traditional comic page" style. When I decided to make it a web comic instead, I basically had to chuck all the storyboarding that complimented a "comic page" layout and rethink things from a vertical scroll layout. It was an interesting exercise. I do admit that vertical scroll is a LOT easier to do - as you don't have to stress as much about "guiding the reader's eye" along the page to make sure they read the panels in the correct order and to make sure that everything "flows" to each panel in a way that moves the eye across the page from panel to panel. Having a vertical scroll layout is quite a bit easier. 

    Post edited by 3Diva on
  • csaacsaa Posts: 406

    3Diva (or anyone who produces comics regularly),

    You mention wrangling your script into the proper form. If I understand the typical process: first there's a script; then there's a storyboard; finally there's the comic product. The script is all text, much like a theater or movie script. From here work moves to the storyboard were panels are laid out, scenes are sketched and dialoged set. Finally, the comic is produced, usually by digital software as a series of image files.

    In Manga:Masters of the Art, Japanese manga creators were interviewed about the process. Interestingly, some treat the script and the storyboard as a scaffolding, to be discarded, and eventually they focus their efforts on the digital comic. The script and the storyboard are simply first sketches, inspirations to get them started and rough out their ideas. Then as their comic evolves in final digital form, they never bother to update their script and storyboards anymore.

    Do you find this workflow practical? Do you find yourself working that way too?

    Cheers!

    3Diva said:

    Thank you for your comments and the support! I really appreciate it! And you're right, web comic layout is a totally different beast. The original script and storyboarding for the comic was in a "traditional comic page" style. When I decided to make it a web comic instead, I basically had to chuck all the storyboarding that complimented a "comic page" layout and rethink things from a vertical scroll layout. It was an interesting exercise. I do admit that vertical scroll is a LOT easier to do - as you don't have to stress as much about "guiding the reader's eye" along the page to make sure they read the panels in the correct order and to make sure that everything "flows" to each panel in a way that moves the eye across the page from panel to panel. Having a vertical scroll layout is quite a bit easier. 
  • 3Diva3Diva Posts: 11,235
    edited August 13
    @csaa I think it all depends on the individual comic creator. Some people absolutely feel the need to solidify everything in the storyboards and stick to their storyboards in order to keep with their original vision for the comic, and some comic creators don't even do thumbnails or storyboards and go straight from script to final panels. And others, as you said, just use the storyboarding as rough guides. Whatever works best for you is the way to go, IMO. I do, personally, recommend storyboarding, though. At least at first. Personally I use them as a rough guide, but for me it's an important step in the process. At least for my workflow at this point, perhaps some day I will be able to just go straight from script to final panels without storyboards. But right now I find it VERY helpful to do the storyboards. Sometimes once the scenes are set up I end up liking a different camera angle better, so while the storyboards are important for my workflow, they are only a well thought out guide. An important guide for me, but not something I feel the need to copy perfectly. (Sorry for the wall of text,I'm on mobile and paragraph breaks don't seem to get saved.)
    Post edited by 3Diva on
  • FirstBastionFirstBastion Posts: 6,006

    .Story,  storyboards, and final finished art.  Each of these are separate specialties and are required step in the process. Not recognizing them as unique steps will lead to a less than optimal final product. They are also separate stages in the pre-production - production pipeline. If an artist is wearing all those hats on a one person production, then the line blur. But in larger organisations each of these talents are separate and distinct. And credited as such.

  • 3Diva3Diva Posts: 11,235
    edited August 13

    .Story,  storyboards, and final finished art.  Each of these are separate specialties and are required step in the process. Not recognizing them as unique steps will lead to a less than optimal final product. They are also separate stages in the pre-production - production pipeline. If an artist is wearing all those hats on a one person production, then the line blur. But in larger organisations each of these talents are separate and distinct. And credited as such.

    That's a good point, I had assumed they where talking about one individual producing a comic on their own - but even in the case of a team, in traditional comic creations the team is usually: Writer, Editor, Penciler, Inker, Letterer. So the storyboarding would be done by the same person drawing the comic and usually isn't "set in stone", so it would be up to their personal discretion how closely they follow the storyboards. If however the storyboarding is done by a different person and approved by the writer it would be more important to stick as closely to the storyboards as possible. :) For someone wearing all the hats the "best way" will always be what works best for the creator. Personally though, I think storyboards are most of the time a very important part of the process.
    Post edited by 3Diva on
  • LinwellyLinwelly Posts: 5,386

    I'm working without story boards.

    What I do is that I have a story draft which goes through several editions until I've come to a pont where I say this is what I want and need. some parts are rather detailed and contain conversations I want in there finished other parts are far more loos in their layout. as well this contains background information abotu the place, the culture etc, all relevant characters and ther descriptions for the main characters the characterdevelopment is in there as well.

    from this I write a script which is very detailed for each episode, giving the setting, the mood, the lights, descripbing all characters positions and actions and what they will say including camera angles etc.

    from that I create the panels

    if I would go through making story boards like from hand I would never finish a single thing cool. But then I'm working in scroll down format. I believe getting a good arrangement of the panels towards each other with a traction through the page is important for traditional format.

    so my opinion on this is go by what you can do, experiment with what works for you ( for as long as you're working alone, one you get more people on board you need to find a routine that works for all). Sticking to rules for the sake of rules and by that losing interest would be a pity

    also don't be like me, go for a small project first, something that can be wrapped up in a few weeks or month time. That will give you a huge learning boost for larger projects

  • Griffin AvidGriffin Avid Posts: 3,640

    Sticking to rules for the sake of rules and by that losing interest would be a pity

    I think too many people think there are rules. I see so many different "How to make comics" books referenced across the internet(s). I'm not speaking specifically about any set mentioned on the DAZ FORUMS, but I have heard comic pros make fun of books that show you how to do things and then list a bunch of 'rules'. I think it should be about TOOLS and the only rule is to use the tools effectively. 

    That said, @3Diva: I'm glad you popped on an explained why you made some of those choices. I honestly didn't think you made some grand meta choice for better storytelling, but I didn't want to say anything.

    Your real 'establishing shot' looks like the wide one that shows where you characters are throwing down. (It lets us know they are in a suburban house). 

    The shot that shows the street is more of a chapter break. And usually, a convention, not a rule - is that the scale of the image matches the scale of the information.

    You name the city/town and show a population count. Usually an image that shows the whole town/city would be expected. It's like showing a picture of a large City and saying "Planet Earth".

    Overall it's a very fresh start. What happened to the young girl and the dojo? Where's that comic?

    -------------------

    My friend who draws- saw your comic and LOVED IT. Was blown away by the style and said "If I drew like that, I'd be happy!".

    He loves the alien design and the characters. Loves that you got right to the action.

    What else....says he wants to know what going to happen the couple - especially her future-baby.

    The nit picks ....well, yeah they were some of those....

    Thought the guy was wimpy and soft. Lolz.

    Said he would have done better if he was there. (I guess it's good that people are putting themselves in your story).

    All good so far. PS, he took martial arts, but I don't think he's beating one of your aliens. double-lol 

     

  • 3Diva3Diva Posts: 11,235

    Griffin Avid said:

    Sticking to rules for the sake of rules and by that losing interest would be a pity

    I think too many people think there are rules. I see so many different "How to make comics" books referenced across the internet(s). I'm not speaking specifically about any set mentioned on the DAZ FORUMS, but I have heard comic pros make fun of books that show you how to do things and then list a bunch of 'rules'. I think it should be about TOOLS and the only rule is to use the tools effectively. 

    Yeah when it comes to art or any creative work there, for the most part, aren't really any hard and fast rules - more like strong guidelines. There have been people who have been very successful with "breaking the rules". That's not to say that they aren't helpful though, and more often than not when those "rules" are broken, the work suffers for it. So I'd say just use them as guides and if you feel very strongly that you want to go in a way that a "rule" advises against, go with your gut. As @Linwelly put it "experiment with what works for you". And I couldn't agree more that sticking to the rules for the sake of the rules at the expense of your own passion to do something would be a real pity. I'd hate for anyone to lose their drive to work on their art simply because of a "rule" that they didn't feel like following. Whatever works for you (as long as it's not hurting anyone else), I say go for it. :)

    You name the city/town and show a population count. Usually an image that shows the whole town/city would be expected. It's like showing a picture of a large City and saying "Planet Earth".

    Yeah, perhaps it could have used a city shot first and then the shot of the neighborhood. Or maybe just under the name of the city, adding something like "The Neighborhood of Westbank". Might have been better, idk. Something to keep in mind for future establishing shots. Thank you. :)

    What happened to the young girl and the dojo? Where's that comic?

    That's Monster Crush. It's my "baby", so I'm still working on it. lol But I wanted to release a mini-comic for "practice" first. So Humane Harvest is kind of my "test run" to work out the kinks and help me get my workflow solidified a bit more. I found it too stressful trying to get out Monster Crush when I have so much invested in the characters and the story and not having enough experience with comic production on a solo level. Don't get me wrong, the work I've done in the comic industry in the past as a colorist and inker has been a huge help, but wearing "all the hats" and telling MY stories 100% on my own and in this particular medium (as opposed to traditional comics) is a completely different animal. I felt it was best to do a story that was kind of small first - that way I can work out what issues I might have, get my style down a bit better, and help me to figure out the whys and hows of getting a comic from my written script to a readable fleshed out comic.

    Humane Harvest SHOULD be only 3 episodes long (as long as I can work out the scope of what I want to tell in the last episode within the upload limit of Webtoons). If not it will end up being 4 episodes long, but no longer than that. I have the first two episodes up. The last bit is going to be tricky. Being able to convey the meaning of the story in a way that I want the reader to understand it, is challenging. But I hope I can pull it off. :)

    My friend who draws- saw your comic and LOVED IT. Was blown away by the style and said "If I drew like that, I'd be happy!".

    He loves the alien design and the characters. Loves that you got right to the action.

    What else....says he wants to know what going to happen the couple - especially her future-baby.

    Hahah That put a big smile on my face! I'm very happy to hear that he liked it! As for what's going to happen, hopefully, he'll be interested in continuing to read the series and finding out. :)

    The nit picks ....well, yeah they were some of those....

    Thought the guy was wimpy and soft. Lolz.

    Said he would have done better if he was there. (I guess it's good that people are putting themselves in your story).

    All good so far. PS, he took martial arts, but I don't think he's beating one of your aliens. double-lol 

    haha Well I did try to convey the size and strength of the aliens, but I guess if he thinks he could have beaten one of them I probably failed in that regard. lol Their size and strength is even greater than that of a gorilla, and it's been said about gorillas that they can even rip a man's arms out of their sockets. So yeah... unless you are superhuman, I don't think there's much of a chance there. lol I suppose I could have done a better job of showing their size and strength. I thought with the alien knocking the door off it's hinges so easily and knocking David unconscious with just a backhand that it was enough to show their strength but I probably should have done better there to show how powerless humans are against them as far as their sheer size and strength. 

    Tell your friend that I do appreciate the feedback and that I'm very happy to hear that he likes it so far! And thank you, Drew, for the feedback as well! It's very much appreciated! 

  • 3Diva3Diva Posts: 11,235
    edited August 18

    Linwelly said:

     

    ...go for a small project first, something that can be wrapped up in a few weeks or month time. That will give you a huge learning boost for larger projects

    ^^ THIS ^^

    All the YESES x 1000! Start small, very small. A comic that's just a few pages long would be advisable as your first project. So don't try to do your big story or passion project as your first comic. I HIGHLY recommend doing a short mini-comic that can be wrapped up in a few short pages. Just a mini-story or something short that you don't have to stress about as much. It's a GREAT way to get your workflow down, to get some experience, to really solidify your style and help you to get the "bad" out. Because we all start out sucking at anything new we do, having a small project we don't have quite as much invested in helps to gain experience and really work out the roughness that we all have when starting something new. 

    Post edited by 3Diva on
  • Griffin AvidGriffin Avid Posts: 3,640

    Oh no, the aliens are PLENTY STRONG. It's that the guy didn't get much done. I just don't think he's the typical guy-who-can-do-it-all character.

    And I think - he thinks that the guy is your main character. I lean more towards the female as the central person.

    Update us when the next section goes live, please.

     

  • csaacsaa Posts: 406
    edited August 18

    3Diva said:

    Linwelly said:

    ...go for a small project first, something that can be wrapped up in a few weeks or month time. That will give you a huge learning boost for larger projects

    ^^ THIS ^^

    All the YESES x 1000! Start small, very small.

    3Diva, Linwelly:

    Hear, hear! And so this is my stab (once again) at a x1000 small comic. laugh

    Cheers!

     

    Sgts. Andrea, Cleo & Inez: Invitation to Bloodsport | Daz assets and set up | Blender Eeeve render | Clip Studio Paint post-edit

    Post edited by csaa on
  • 3Diva3Diva Posts: 11,235

    Oh no, the aliens are PLENTY STRONG. It's that the guy didn't get much done. I just don't think he's the typical guy-who-can-do-it-all character.

    And I think - he thinks that the guy is your main character. I lean more towards the female as the central person.

    Update us when the next section goes live, please.

     

    lol Yeah, he's kind of meant to be an "average joe" or "guy next door". I'll try and let you know when I update the series. It might be a while as it looks like we're not able to edit or update our entries until the Call to Action contest is over.
  • 3Diva3Diva Posts: 11,235
    csaa said:

    3Diva said:

    Linwelly said:

    ...go for a small project first, something that can be wrapped up in a few weeks or month time. That will give you a huge learning boost for larger projects

    ^^ THIS ^^

    All the YESES x 1000! Start small, very small.

    3Diva, Linwelly:

    Here, here! And so this is my stab (once again) at a x1000 small comic. laugh

    Cheers!

     

    Sgts. Andrea, Cleo & Inez: Invitation to Bloodsport | Daz assets and set up | Blender Eeeve render | Clip Studio Paint post-edit

    I think it might need more panels or context or narration. I'm not understanding it. The image is really cool, I just don't understand what they're trying to say.
  • LinwellyLinwelly Posts: 5,386

    nice one box @csaa  laugh that's a start

    I really like the way you turned the render to comic style there

  • FirstBastionFirstBastion Posts: 6,006

    3Diva said:

    csaa said:

    3Diva said:

    Linwelly said:

    ...go for a small project first, something that can be wrapped up in a few weeks or month time. That will give you a huge learning boost for larger projects

    ^^ THIS ^^

    All the YESES x 1000! Start small, very small.

    3Diva, Linwelly:

    Here, here! And so this is my stab (once again) at a x1000 small comic. laugh

    Cheers!

     

    Sgts. Andrea, Cleo & Inez: Invitation to Bloodsport | Daz assets and set up | Blender Eeeve render | Clip Studio Paint post-edit

    I think it might need more panels or context or narration. I'm not understanding it. The image is really cool, I just don't understand what they're trying to say.

     I have no idea what the context of the panel is in the overall story, but I'll take a stab at it just for fun.   Sgt. Inez wants Cleo and Andrea to get along, hence the peace offering of the flower and the ask, as she look down upon her two friends in the fray,   while both Cleo and Andrea are at odds with each other and ready to go to war. Their whole 3 person alliance is at risk of blowing up.

  • csaacsaa Posts: 406
    edited August 19

    FirstBastion said:

    3Diva said:

    Sgts. Andrea, Cleo & Inez: Invitation to Bloodsport | Daz assets and set up | Blender Eeeve render | Clip Studio Paint post-edit

    I think it might need more panels or context or narration. I'm not understanding it. The image is really cool, I just don't understand what they're trying to say.

     I have no idea what the context of the panel is in the overall story, but I'll take a stab at it just for fun.   Sgt. Inez wants Cleo and Andrea to get along, hence the peace offering of the flower and the ask, as she look down upon her two friends in the fray,   while both Cleo and Andrea are at odds with each other and ready to go to war. Their whole 3 person alliance is at risk of blowing up.

     

     3Diva, Linwelly, FirstBastion:

    One important thing I've learned is that once an author puts his creation out in the public, the author loses some authority on his handiwork's meaning. That is, viewers will apply their own interpretation, bringing their own POV, their own beliefs and assumptions, their own life experiences and cultural background to the experience. I'm quite guilty of posting one-piece images, thinking that it has enough to get my meaning across. But invariably people will react as if the image meant something else. Like a Rorschach Inkblot, they reveal something of themselves.

    Thankfully the responses I've gotten have been netural to positive. So I've learned to roll with it -- to appreciate and even to learn from other people's POV.  "Oh, I didn't think about that!" laugh Life is full of pleasant surprises that way.

    I find that the most meaningful characters are those that act out stories which draw from our shared experiences. Looking at real world events, one long running theme is the greater role that women have come to assume. This trend has been going on for decades, uppending the convention of a male-dominated world. It's the kind of change that invites counter-reaction -- conflict -- which sets up an interesting story.

    So in this one, there is a fourth person off-camera, the one the three ladies are interacting with. In the police force, he's the alpha male, the swaggering colleague who's intent on showing these women their proper place.

       Sgt. Cleo (Exasperated): Pff-fft. C'mon, show up or shut up. Why not get in the ring and settle this the time-honored way?

       Sgt. Inez (Taunting): Oh, I'll go easy on you ... like the wallflower that you are.

       Sgt. Andrea (Mock-Comisserating): Eh, you know she graduated top in her class in hand-to-hand combat, right? Yup. Nice knowing you by the way.

    So the dust up unfolds. Without let up. Without anyone emerging the victor.

    Then the twist in the story happens. A higher up -- a stiff upper lip lieutenant -- arrives at the gym and breaks the fight off. He then announces that both brawlers have to team up to solve a crucial case, regardless of their differences. So the sulking, unlikely pair head off to work together. Eventually they solve the case, but along the way they learn something about one another, mellowing their outlook, and, in the end, rewarding each other with grudging respect. A redemption story.

    Cheers!

    Post edited by csaa on
  • LinwellyLinwelly Posts: 5,386

    @csaa

    thanks for adding the story idea there, so if I may add some idea to the visualisation, this would be a thing I believe woudl work and give the viewer this feeling of revelation

    zoom out for a second set shouwing us the 4th yet invisible person to whom their conversation is addressed showing his reaction (walking in the scne with a sway of having the upper hand?)

    then add a third panel zooming out even further showing the higher up commanding them into a team - everyone in shock

  • WittWitt Posts: 11
    edited September 21

     3Diva, Linwelly, FirstBastion:

    One important thing I've learned is that once an author puts his creation out in the public, the author loses some authority on his handiwork's meaning. That is, viewers will apply their own interpretation, bringing their own POV, their own beliefs and assumptions, their own life experiences and cultural background to the experience. I'm quite guilty of posting one-piece images, thinking that it has enough to get my meaning across. But invariably people will react as if the image meant something else. Like a Rorschach Inkblot, they reveal something of themselves.

     

     

    I wrote a lot of GURPS books some years back for Steve Jackson Games, and they always required an extensive playtest online. But, for example, on a word-count basis, All the King's Men (about 81,000 words) generated more playtest comments than the original book! THAT was a little too much information from would-be readers. Did their comments help the book? Definitely - some of them. But the bulk of it was me just wading through the comments, arguements, trolling (!), and so forth to find the gems. 

    For my graphic novel, I have a very small cadre of people I trust who actually give me helpful comments, not opinions or judgments or anything like that. It's made up of only 8 people and I find it very helpful. They've done as much for Crossroads as 90,000+ words of playtest did, without all the rigamarole. 

    So my point? Finding a small group of critics that you trust can make the difference between a good project and a mediocre one. No man is an island, as they say, and no matter how good you think your work is (or bad!) you're wrong. :) And, side note, if you've got a large audience you're posting to (e.g., webtoons), make sure you don't take it personally. ("Don't listen to everything people say." - Ecclesiastes 7:21). 

    Really like this thread - thanks to all who are posting!

    Witt / Brian J. Underhill

    Deviant ArtFacebook

    Post edited by Witt on
  • LinwellyLinwelly Posts: 5,386

    wait what? you made GURPS books? Cool, I played the system for a while

  • csaacsaa Posts: 406

    I haven't posted in a while. I just wanted to share some renders with the new shaders I've been developing.

    Cheers!

    Sgts. Andrea, Cleo & Inez | Daz assets and set up | Blender Eevee render | Clip Studio Paint post-edit

Sign In or Register to comment.