Somethings to Consider when starting to learn CG

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  • GnotMeGnotMe Posts: 118
    edited December 1969

    Szark,

    Great post.

    Thanks,

    Dan

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558
    edited December 1969

    Thanks Dan

  • asilyadasilyad Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    You forgot to add, when all else fails, go back to the beginning. I realize that I SUCK at sculpting, but that 3D is a different option. I have really cool character and costume ideas, but also know my limitations at reproduction. I still go back periodically and actually DRAW a character. I just can't seem to recapture the face again.

  • Cat_DancingCat_Dancing Posts: 208
    edited December 1969

    Szark - how yuh doin'? I realise that this 'missive' was written some time ago but I've just come across it. I find it a great , 'tell it like it is' for someone like me who is just starting out into CG. I am a retired oldie with some time on his hands and have always enjoyed digital art, even before it was digitised, back when it was called Fantasy Art. I was always fascinated by the art work of Roger Dean who did many album covers in the 60s and 70s. Anyhow, thanks for a very good article. My best wishes.

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558
    edited December 1969

    I am doin fine thanks robert. That is why I wrote it so that is cool, thanks for taking the time to post a comment.

    Have fun

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558
    edited December 1969

    asilyad said:
    You forgot to add, when all else fails, go back to the beginning. I realize that I SUCK at sculpting, but that 3D is a different option. I have really cool character and costume ideas, but also know my limitations at reproduction. I still go back periodically and actually DRAW a character. I just can't seem to recapture the face again.
    good point. Yeah I often go back and watch/read tutorials again as a refresher. It is amazing how much I forget. :)
  • artoirartoir Posts: 65
    edited December 1969

    Thanks for this, it really encourages me to just do it...slowly. 2 years ago I joined a site, which is actually a game/social site, and began designing clothing for premade avatars. Yes I was doing it all by hand, folds, wrinkles, bulges, etc in Photoshop. Though frustrating at times because tutorials were very limited and there has been hours of trials and errors, I found it very cool and something I discovered I liked...really liked. Now I have found Daz3D, and I feel like I have discovered a 20 pound diamond in a lost cave! I have made a few renders already, mainly for myself and just playing. But it's very satisfying to me, because I'M happy with the results. To the pro, I'm sure it looks like an 8 year old's crayon drawing, but it makes me happy. I will get better, I know I will; my only problem is I like shake and bake results. However, after designing these avatar clothes by hand in PS, I know that's not gonna happen, but that's ok, I'm gonna be patient on this one because it's something I love....already. Again, thanks for this post, it has made me step back and say ok, let's do this by it's own rules....not mine.

    Pleased.jpg
    1280 x 960 - 505K
  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558
    edited December 1969

    artoir first off welcome to DAZ3D and to the forums.

    My pleasure. All I did it for was just that, for newcomers, like me 5 years ago, to step back and ask themselves what they want to do and get out of doing it. You got the most important aspect..."what makes you happy". I still look as some of my pieces and I am still not happy...some I am ecstatic about but I want more. Overall I am happy with my progress so I can't complain much.

    And given you comments about how your image looks and posting it in a public place tells a lot about your attitude...very positive, What a great start. Don't forget to check out my render thread that has a few tutorials posted at the top of page 1.

  • artoirartoir Posts: 65
    edited December 1969

    Thanks so much for your comments.... and for the welcome!

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558
    edited December 1969

    My pleasure and sorry for the delay in replying.

  • recombinantmicroberecombinantmicrobe Posts: 26
    edited December 1969

    Little tiny tip:
    I won't pretend to be an expert... I'm just a hobbyist but I learned a thing or two along the way and a few quick and dirty tricks to speeding up render times I've picked up along the way are the following:

    1. Eliminate any props in the scene or structural elements to buildings, etc. that fall outside the range of the camera window prior to rendering (less objects means less system resources get gobbled). As far as the camera is concerned, if it can't see it, those things "don't exist", so having your rig have to chug through rendering them anyway is kind of a waste most of the time.
    2. Reduce the number of light sources to as few as you can get by with to still have the lighting and shadow effects you're trying to have in a scene.
    3. For the rendering itself, generally most of the time the only camera you need in a scene is the one you want the audience to be viewing the scene through. I think it makes sense to have multiple cameras in a scene if somebody is a content maker and the scene is a set they made but if you're just going to be rendering from one area in the scene when making a piece of art, why have all that extra stuff for your computer to have to chew on?

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558
    edited December 1969

    Thanks recombinantmicrobe for adding that.

    1: Only if you aren't using real reflections. But you can remove everything behind the object giving the reflections and out of the camera's view.
    2: It all depends on the surfaces and type of shadows used. For good light set ups a 7 point (not point lights) and an environment fill light is good for most scenes like realistic portraits. If not doing realistic images then a 3 point light rig would suffice.
    3: Cameras don't take much memory at all and deleting them won't make much of a difference,so much so you wouldn't even notice.

  • recombinantmicroberecombinantmicrobe Posts: 26
    edited December 1969

    Szark said:
    Thanks recombinantmicrobe for adding that.

    1: Only if you aren't using real reflections. But you can remove everything behind the object giving the reflections and out of the camera's view.
    2: It all depends on the surfaces and type of shadows used. For good light set ups a 7 point (not point lights) and an environment fill light is good for most scenes like realistic portraits. If not doing realistic images then a 3 point light rig would suffice.
    3: Cameras don't take much memory at all and deleting them won't make much of a difference,so much so you wouldn't even notice.



    No probs and nice addendum.
  • nicsttnicstt Posts: 8,229
    edited January 2015

    Interesting read, very actually, but one topic you didn't mention (or I didn't see), and it is important to everything else.

    The image is going to be telling a story. Let the content and light set-up, even the style chosen, compliment that story.

    Because knowing the story we want to tell gives us a goal to aim for.

    Post edited by nicstt on
  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558
    edited December 1969

    Well to be honest that is more to do with the Art itself and not the software but yes a valid point.

  • nicsttnicstt Posts: 8,229
    edited December 1969

    Szark said:
    Well to be honest that is more to do with the Art itself and not the software but yes a valid point.

    Art is all about telling stories. :) Something about a picture paints a thousand words. One just can't get folks to agree on the words.

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558
    edited December 1969

    Oh I agree and with me I like to leave the story wide open for interpretation, that is half the fun for me.

  • nicsttnicstt Posts: 8,229
    edited December 1969

    Agree.

    Leaving room for interpretation, is best, although personally I think it is close to impossible to make art and restrict its interpretation; or at least completely restrict.

  • king.bidzinskiking.bidzinski Posts: 66
    edited December 1969

    What should I start with in order to learn how to use daz well? I want to be able to create animations and great cg work and also some designs to 3d print

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558
    edited April 2015

    Hi king.bidzinski welcome to the forums.

    Well to learn DS there is this http://www.daz3d.com/daz-studio-beginner-to-advanced new series of tutorials. Disclaimer: I don't have it so I cannot say how good or bad it is.

    I learnt over the last 6 years, teaching myself.

    Have you got an art background?

    3D printing: You should read the EULA (End User License Agreement) http://www.daz3d.com/eula to truly understand what you can 3D Print and what you cannot. Any model you make yourself is ok.

    Post edited by Szark on
  • king.bidzinskiking.bidzinski Posts: 66
    edited December 1969

    Szark said:
    Hi king.bidzinski welcome to the forums.

    Well to learn DS there is this http://www.daz3d.com/daz-studio-beginner-to-advanced new series of tutorials. Disclaimer: I don't have it so I cannot say how good or bad it is.

    I learnt over the last 6 years, teaching myself.

    Have you got an art background?

    3D printing: You should read the EULA (End User License Agreement) http://www.daz3d.com/eula to truly understand what you can 3D Print and what you cannot. Any model you make yourself is ok.

    I will start reading the end user license on that last link, back in about a week when I finish reading it :D
  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558
    edited December 1969

    LOL tell me about it. It is a long one isn't it.

  • wingpeg021wingpeg021 Posts: 42

    since iam new at learning daz studio does anyone know how you would tuggle a differnt camera view while recording animation in daz studio ?

  • wingpeg021wingpeg021 Posts: 42

    i mean you know use different camera angles and be able to record them fame wise in diffent angles  ? i know for 1 use a set up a camera the 2 i am unsure about ?

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558

    sorry wingpeg I don't do animations and wouldn't know where to start. Hopefully someone else will know and reply to you.

  • wingpeg021wingpeg021 Posts: 42

    that's alright thanks appreciate your honesty.

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558

    Thanks yeah with somethings I do go away and try to find the answers and I have a tonne of links to suit a lot of questions but amimations is beyond my interets so I never got into it. I do use the timeline for Drapping Dynamic clothing etc but it is just a tool for me. :)

  • wingpeg021wingpeg021 Posts: 42

    "Drapping dynamic chothing" mmmm sounds interesting, since i really  don't know  daz studio  tools  that well wiuld that be in designing chothes for genesis.

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558

    no that in this case means what it says. http://www.daz3d.com/optitex

  • SzarkSzark Posts: 10,558

    I  got an email saying someone had replied but it looks like the mods snaffled it. Could someone PM letting me know why please.

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