Mirror Rings

I made a pipe. The pipe was made of a cyliner which I made thicker. Now I want to make a morph to make it longer or shorter.

Is there a function I could select the inside surface and the coresponding outside surface, without a hand selection.

Comments

  • Wee Dangerous JohnWee Dangerous John Posts: 1,258
    edited June 2016

    Have you got Daz Studio, if so you export your pipe as an OBJ file Close Hex), then in DS send it back to Hexagon with the DS-Hex Bridge. Then using soft selection and Symmetry select one side and move it along. The soft selection is to help keep the texture from stretching too much, it will but every little helps :)

    Note - for future reference, you may will want to get it ready for textures etc before saving the obj. 

    I made a quick video for you, please mute the sound :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYI3fVK6esQ

    Selection wise, what I did was to select a face from outside, then another on the inside, choose loop (may have to press L twice) then Between.

    Post edited by Wee Dangerous John on
  • ExperimenterExperimenter Posts: 147

    Thank you for your answer. I is really helpful. But I forgot to mention that I want to morph the pipe in other ways, too. I made two pictures of a problem I have. The first picture shows the change in the outside of the pipe. The second shows the problem I have. I changed the outside of the pipe but the inside of the pipe is still the same. But I want that the inside surface moves in the same directions as the outside. How could I select the same surface at the outside and at the inside of the pipe. Remeber the outside surface was made by thickness so the outside and the inside are at the same places.

    Rohrmorph außen.png
    1273 x 669 - 219K
    Rohrmorph innen.png
    573 x 565 - 70K
  • Wee Dangerous JohnWee Dangerous John Posts: 1,258
    edited June 2016

    Not sure what you are trying to achieve, do you just want to select inside and outside faces at the same time. I did that in the example above, first select a face on the inside, hold down shift and select a face on the outside. Press "L" to loop (you may have to press "L" twice to loop in the right direction) then choose the between option. Pressing Shift + and - (number pad) will increase/decrease the selection.

    Alternatively, when selecting the faces chosse 2 faces (2 inside and 2 outside) running in the correct direction and you will only have to press the L key once.

    Another video, here I would be making a morph, sending it to Daz Studio and naming it, then repeating the process. 

    https://youtu.be/JHiJcY3Y_9I

     

    Post edited by Wee Dangerous John on
  • ExperimenterExperimenter Posts: 147

    I thought there would be a function in which I select a face/more faces on the outside use this function I do not know if it exciste and the same face/faces on the other side is selected, too. 

  • MorkonanMorkonan Posts: 215
    edited June 2016

    At the bottom right of the screen in Hexagon, you'll find the "Transparency" toggle. (Looks like a cube) Toggle that and then, whenever you select the point, line or face tool, the object will be transparent. Use that in conjunction with the "Hide Backfaces" toggle, next to it, to select the points/lines/faces you want.

    PS - To expand or reduce any selection, use the SHIFT +/- keys*.

     

    *Edit - Fixed "+/-" :)

    Post edited by Morkonan on
  • ExperimenterExperimenter Posts: 147

    Ok. That means there is no funktion, is not it?

  • Wee Dangerous JohnWee Dangerous John Posts: 1,258
    edited June 2016

    There is no automatic function, but the method Morkonan suggested is quick and painless, espectially if you are the correct view (straight on).

    Edit - to remove something :) 

    Post edited by Wee Dangerous John on
  • MorkonanMorkonan Posts: 215

    Ok. That means there is no funktion, is not it?

    No, there is no function to do this. The only way that Hexagon, and most other 3D programs, can detect the "inside" of something is roughly through the use of face normals. While you're actually constructing in a 3D environment, most 3D programs do not attempt to guess what the "inside" of something is, as the programs just can't usually recognize objects in that way and there would be limited utility for them to do so. In fact, aside from the three cardinal axes and their relationships to the object and its vertices, the only "direction" that a normal 3D program considers is what direction a "face" is facing. (Face normal.)

    Despite the program giving you a 3D environment to construct objects within, it is only a simulated 3D environment and the program, like many other 3D programs, doesn't really understand the 3D space as intuitively as a human being might. There are exceptions to this, especially with "simulators" that include a physics modeling or a material modeling system. But, none of these sorts of intuitive understandings of 3D objects are necessary for the actual construction of them in a simple visual representation. When in doubt, try to understand the model you're making as the program might, with only the relationships between connecting vertices, it's orientation along the relative axes, it's position in 3D space in the working field, and the direction of face normals as having any bearing on the appearance of the object in question and what you can do with it as far as the program is concerned.

    TLDR - Like every other 3D program out there, you have to learn how to lie to it and understand how it lies to you in order to get it to do what you want it to do in the simulated 3D space. :)

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