Smoothing a rounded surface

kaotkblisskaotkbliss Posts: 2,768
edited December 1969 in Hexagon Discussion

I have a helmet prop which had a couple pieces on it I didn't like, so I chopped them off and covered the hole with a facet. Now there are 2 square areas on the back of the helmet which I'd like to round off following the shape of the helmet's curve. Is there a quick, easy way to do this or do I have to adjust all the vertices manually?

Comments

  • useroperatoruseroperator Posts: 247
    edited December 1969

    we'd have to see exactly what you're working with.

  • kaotkblisskaotkbliss Posts: 2,768
    edited December 1969

    Here's a couple screenshots, the first is with nothing selected so you can see the squared areas, the 2nd is the faces view so you can see each poly (I think that's the correct term)

    Screenshot_2015-01-12_22.09_.52_.png
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    Screenshot_2015-01-12_22.07_.28_.png
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  • useroperatoruseroperator Posts: 247
    edited December 1969

    yeah that's not such an easy fix, especially for a curved conforming surface. you could add smoothing levels, but that wouldn't get rid of the features completely and would make the part more resource intensive. It'd probably be easier to just model the whole thing from scratch than to remove that bit of geometry.

  • kaotkblisskaotkbliss Posts: 2,768
    edited December 1969

    I was afraid of that :(

    It would probably be easier to re-cut out those facets then fill them in using the curve from a primitive sphere maybe

  • useroperatoruseroperator Posts: 247
    edited January 2015

    you could try,. but I'm afraid you will just still end up with artifacts along the edges. you could try softening the normals along the vertices. of course you might ask yourself.....do I really need to worry about something in the back of a helmet? some things just aren't worth the trouble.

    Post edited by useroperator on
  • kaotkblisskaotkbliss Posts: 2,768
    edited December 1969

    That's sort of what I did with the visor for the faceplate. I didn't like the original one as it had some sort of samurai face on it so I completely cut it out then created a primitive sphere and deleted the faces I didn't need and adjusted the edge vertices to line up with the helmet. I haven't completely finished that part yet, but it's close. I might be able to use the same idea on these sections as well.

    Just wanted to make sure there wasn't a simple tool I wasn't seeing (I did try the smoothing tool but it didn't help remove the square areas at all) before I started cutting.

  • useroperatoruseroperator Posts: 247
    edited January 2015

    how I suggest you should go about it, is close the area of the hole, then connect some points to each other across it to try to mimic the pattern of the rest of the curves. then attempt to intelligently move points symmetrically from each side, changing the softness in the properties panel. but I guarantee you, you probably won't get a good looking surface even after a lot of tedium.

    the other part of the problem with the helmet is it's not clean geometry to start with. if it was all quadrilaterals it'd be easier to work with. instead you're working with criss crossing triangles of varying sizes and angles. altering the position of them will alter the normals of the surrounding geometry. it's like pulling one thread only to have another unravel.

    maybe the best thing to do is find another prop instead of trying to alter an existing one. unless you made the prop, then just remake it without that feature.

    what you could do, is change nothing and work with it, put tubes or wires coming from that position of the helmet going into the suit or something like that.

    Post edited by useroperator on
  • RoygeeRoygee Posts: 2,232
    edited December 1969

    user.operator is correct - the reason you are getting artifacts is that the new geometry you have built to close the hole is a mess. As he says, you need to get the new geometry to match the existing.

    What I have done in these pics of a sphere with the same type of geometry:-

    1. Is where I deleted to make a hole - see the highlighted edges.

    2. Bridged those four edges

    3. Selected the centre of the three new vertical edges, ring-select and join.

    4. Selected the four new facets and used the triangular tessellation tool to make new edges corner-to-corner to perfectly match the existing surrounding geometry.

    I realise that a simple sphere probably in not as complex as what you have. I'd suggest posting a pic of the original (not in transparent mode) with the area you want deleted marked - could possibly give you better advice on how to start it off to end up with a better product :)

    helm4.jpg
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    helm3.jpg
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    helm2.jpg
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    helm1.jpg
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  • stem_athomestem_athome Posts: 363
    edited December 1969

    Hi,

    There is not a one-click solution, but there is a tool that can be used. "Surface Modeling > Gordon Surface"

    I have posted about this before, but it must of been on the old forum. So here are the steps needed (it is quite quick once you know what is needed, and how to select).

    The "Gordon Surface" requires a network of curves(lines), so we need to create those first, then use the "Gordon Surface".

    See attached pic:-

    1. Simple example with square cutout. (letters added to edges to help explain).
    What is important, to get a good result, is that edges A and B have the same number of vertex, and that edges C and D have the same number of vertex. If not, then the result is not so good.

    2. Select edges A and B

    3. Use "Lines > Curve extraction" to create lines from those edges (you could instead use "Ctrl+C"(to copy those edges), then "Ctrl+P"(to paste the edges as lines into scene)

    4. Select edges C and D. Repeat step 3

    5. That will give you 4 seperate lines(curves). I have hidden the mesh to show the curves.

    6. Select the "Surface Modeling > Gordon Surface" Tool.

    7. We need to select the curves as a network. In this simple example, we first select A+B (as you select the curves they will change to red color). Press "Enter".
    Select curves C+D (they will change to green color when selected).

    8. Press "Enter" and the mesh will be created.

    9. Un-hide the hidden mesh to check result.

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  • JoeMamma2000JoeMamma2000 Posts: 2,615
    edited December 1969

    Excellent solution Steve....

    And don't forget to weld point when you're all done of course.

    Nice.

  • RoygeeRoygee Posts: 2,232
    edited December 1969

    Really elegant solution, Steve :)

    I love using the surfaces tools - don't know why I didn't consider those for this fix..

  • kaotkblisskaotkbliss Posts: 2,768
    edited December 1969

    Wow, lots of helpful tips :)
    I'm only just learning and the best way for me is to start small (In this case, edit pre-existing models to become familiar with some of the tools and basic feel for the program)

    If I were to try modeling from scratch (as I've done before in other 3D software) I become overwhelmed and give up.

    My first step was learning how to remove geometries I didn't want, then I leaned to cut and group parts together. I learned how to create a material surface and now I'm learning how to patch holes so the next step can be to add pieces (Like hoses or spikes or whatevers :) )

    At any rate, it seems my next step is to recut the holes and try to patch it again :)

  • m_m_italym_m_italy Posts: 384
    edited December 1969

    Hi,

    There is not a one-click solution, but there is a tool that can be used. "Surface Modeling > Gordon Surface"

    I have posted about this before, but it must of been on the old forum. So here are the steps needed (it is quite quick once you know what is needed, and how to select).

    The "Gordon Surface" requires a network of curves(lines), so we need to create those first, then use the "Gordon Surface".

    See attached pic:-

    1. Simple example with square cutout. (letters added to edges to help explain).
    What is important, to get a good result, is that edges A and B have the same number of vertex, and that edges C and D have the same number of vertex. If not, then the result is not so good.

    2. Select edges A and B

    3. Use "Lines > Curve extraction" to create lines from those edges (you could instead use "Ctrl+C"(to copy those edges), then "Ctrl+P"(to paste the edges as lines into scene)

    4. Select edges C and D. Repeat step 3

    5. That will give you 4 seperate lines(curves). I have hidden the mesh to show the curves.

    6. Select the "Surface Modeling > Gordon Surface" Tool.

    7. We need to select the curves as a network. In this simple example, we first select A+B (as you select the curves they will change to red color). Press "Enter".
    Select curves C+D (they will change to green color when selected).

    8. Press "Enter" and the mesh will be created.

    9. Un-hide the hidden mesh to check result.

    Ottimo come sempre Steve.
    Bye

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