How to create a Triangle Primitive in Carrara?

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  • RoygeeRoygee Posts: 2,242
    edited December 1969

    Now to through the cat among the pigeons - doesn't fillet too well, does it?

    :cheese::lol:

  • ShazGTShazGT Posts: 15
    edited December 1969

    Thanks for the replies, will have to read through more of this when I get a chance to, experiment some more and see if I can get it to work right.

    Bit late replying back, been busy with work, and not going to slow down much in the next week or so, so figured I'd at least quick reply back, so it doesn't look like I fell of the face of the planet.

    In mean time I did download some open source CAD apps, load them up and see if I remembered any of my AutoCAD stuff from High school... nope, LOL, staring at the apps and interfaces, just gazing at things, and not having a clue what to do next.

    I remember, Googles Sketchup was pretty easy to use for really basic crude modeling, but haven't used that in a long time. But figured Carrara and/or Hexagon would be more accurate. Not to mention adding better texture, lighting, etc, to get a better feel of how it would look.

  • Design AcrobatDesign Acrobat Posts: 459
    edited December 1969

    ShazMX6 said:
    Thanks for the replies, will have to read through more of this when I get a chance to, experiment some more and see if I can get it to work right.

    Bit late replying back, been busy with work, and not going to slow down much in the next week or so, so figured I'd at least quick reply back, so it doesn't look like I fell of the face of the planet.

    In mean time I did download some open source CAD apps, load them up and see if I remembered any of my AutoCAD stuff from High school... nope, LOL, staring at the apps and interfaces, just gazing at things, and not having a clue what to do next.

    I remember, Googles Sketchup was pretty easy to use for really basic crude modeling, but haven't used that in a long time. But figured Carrara and/or Hexagon would be more accurate. Not to mention adding better texture, lighting, etc, to get a better feel of how it would look.

    You may want to try out MOI, I believe they still have a 30 day trial. It's relative inexpensive and easy to use. Here's a blurb on it.

    MoI ($295)- MoI (Moment of Inspiration) is a 3D CAD program that was designed to be usable on tablet or pen computers. Because of this, the user interface is simple and doesn’t require a lot of typing. It was written by a single guy, who was one of the original developers of Rhino, so it’s powerful without being bloated. It is equally well-suited to organic or mechanical shapes. Without a doubt, this is one to try.

    http://moi3d.com/

  • DartanbeckDartanbeck Posts: 16,020
    edited December 1969

    I asked Roygee if he's ever messed around with modeling in the Assembly room

    Roygee said:
    Yes, I have - often! One of my most frustrating experiences, mainly because you can only work on one mesh at a time.

    The most obvious use is to make clothing or fix poke-through. In both cases, you need to select mesh that is buried in the body of the figure - sometimes you can select through the body, if the mesh is close enough to the surface, but most times you need to make the body invisible. To do that, you need to exit modelling, make the body invisible, go back to modelling mode, make the selection, make an estimate of how much to move it by, exit, make the body visible, back in....

    In Hex, you simply click to make the body invisible, do the selection, make it visible and carry on. You have to jump through all sorts of hoops to join two meshes - I forget the process, but it doesn't make for efficiency.

    Of course, I could be speaking from ignorance and there may be methods to do these things efficiently, but I haven't found them :)

    Right. I find it to be quick and easy to pop in and out of edit mode. Edit mode always remembers what is selected when exiting, so I just find it nice. I like how I can select polygons through models that are not being edited, but still having them available in the scene...

    Just goes to show you that we all have different tastes of how we like to work. And that is accentuated with the fact that we're both modeling different things for different overall endeavors, etc.,


    Anim8or is a great little app - that is where I started and it was a natural progression to Hex, they being very similar. Sadly, development seems to have stopped - it has some very advanced tools for something this simple. Best UV projection method I've come across, Carrara could learn a lot from it as far as rigging and weight-painting is concerned. It has the ability to put different textures on each side of a poly - something which you would need Fenric's plug-in to do in C.

    I haven't used it for ages, but I still have a soft spot for it and far prefer it to Carrara for modelling. I'd recommend it to anyone starting out in modelling to get a feel for the processes.

    Favorites? - obviously top of the list is Hex, then - slowly getting there - Blender. Nvil is a really advanced modelling app, and I played around with the free version while it was in Beta - the only stand-alone modeler in active development, as far as I know. If I had the $90 spare, I'd get it in a flash:)

    Somehow, I seem to prefer using specialist tools rather than jack-of-all-trades-master- of- none. I don't find it a hassle moving from one to the other - Hex for modelling, UU3D for UV mapping, Daz Studio for rigging and Carrara for texturing, animation and rendering.

    Don't know if you've noticed those sort of flying jet sled things I did for the challenge - they were done this way, including clothing, in a weekend :)

    Here's a link to those cool jet sleds: Roygee's Hexagon Jet Sleds Post

    Thanks man.
    I enjoy your insight. I recalled that you and HeadWax were anim8or buffs. I might have a lot of ambition, but I don't have a lot of experience modeling stuff other than morphs, simple items, and several 'homework' projects I've done on my own.

    I can absolutely understand what you're saying about having a dedicated modeler as opposed to an all-in-one. I was actually planning on going that route when the time came for me to start modeling a lot of my own assets - a part of my epic production that I knew would be coming sooner or later. But when the time came, I just started modeling in the model room and sort of loved it. When I started modeling in the Assembly room... I really got a new sense of joy out of it.

    I have several dedicated modelers, but they all remain virtually unused, so far. Like Archepelis, Hexagon, Anim8or, Blender... but I told myself that I'll remain in Carrara until I find that I cannot do what I want, or it just seems like I could do much better in another.

  • DartanbeckDartanbeck Posts: 16,020
    edited December 1969


    You may want to try out MOI, I believe they still have a 30 day trial. It's relative inexpensive and easy to use. Here's a blurb on it.

    MoI ($295)- MoI (Moment of Inspiration) is a 3D CAD program that was designed to be usable on tablet or pen computers. Because of this, the user interface is simple and doesn’t require a lot of typing. It was written by a single guy, who was one of the original developers of Rhino, so it’s powerful without being bloated. It is equally well-suited to organic or mechanical shapes. Without a doubt, this is one to try.

    http://moi3d.com/

    Cool.
  • DartanbeckDartanbeck Posts: 16,020
    edited December 1969

    I really like those jet sled models!

  • RoygeeRoygee Posts: 2,242
    edited December 1969

    Me, not being fixated on problems, but on solutions and constantly trying out things, have found a way out of the hassle of digging into a figure to get the clothing mesh extracted from the figure :)

    Actually, two methods - one is to put the scene into wireframe mode, then, with some squinting and putting my nose up against the screen, i can differentiate the figure mesh from the clothing mesh and select it. Fortunately, you can switch between solid and wireframe without exiting edit.

    The second method is to select an edge next to where it becomes buried in the figure, expand the selection until it shows on the other side, then deselect as much as is needed to isolate what you want to move, then move it.

    Not very efficient, but it works!

    Hey, Dart - thanks for the comments on the flying jet-sled sort of thing - much appreciated:)

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