September 2019 - Daz 3D New User Challenge - Depth of Field

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Comments

  • Ruris said:

    Buddies.   This is Babina and the DAZ horse, with a standard background, then taken into Photoshop for color grading and a texture.   I had a bit of difficulty getting the camera to do exactly what I wanted for DOF, but it turned out all right anyway.  Still learning!!!

     

    L'Adair said:

    Buddies.   This is Babina and the DAZ horse, with a standard background, then taken into Photoshop for color grading and a texture.   I had a bit of difficulty getting the camera to do exactly what I wanted for DOF, but it turned out all right anyway.  Still learning!!!

    @AZDigitalArtist, this looks really good. With all the postwork, though, it's hard to see where you started. I'd love to see the pre-postworked version…

    Sure.  I didn't really do all that much in post.  I fixed that annoying boxlike structure under the bush, that I couldn't figure out how to deal with in DAZ, and liquefied a weird bump in her hair and burned it a little, then added a texture after patching the top left corner of the sky that rendered too light.  I had hoped to get better DOF, but maybe the multiplane cyclorama doesn't really do DOF all that well, or I just didn't get as much out of it as I could.

    Hi,

    Do explain the the 'add texture' part if you don't mind. 

    Sorry, I didn't see your question.  I added a layer in Photoshop, basically a photograph of a texture from a wall, using a soft light blend mode.  Texturizing is a digital art technique that kind of adds a bit of interest to an otherwise flat art image.  You can also use it to make your image look like it was painted on a cracked surface, for example.  The one I used I purchased from Brooke Shaden.

  • Daedalus-7Daedalus-7 Posts: 116
    edited September 2019
    TigerAnne said:

    Final version, period! 

    So you see, TigerAnne had a late-onset lightbulb moment. Notice how this scene has no visible sky? Yeah... It doesn't need a HDRI at all. Instead I went back to the old trick of borrowing the sun-preset from an outdoor environment. I'll try out all the nifty new tips with another scene later, but this one is actually a resource hog that makes preview a pain to attempt. The distant light sun was infinitely easier to rotate and recolour. In the end I went with a 90-degree angle, and used a ghost light to soften the facial shadows a little.

    At this point in a picture's evolution I'm usually so fed up with it that I hate it, no matter how much it has improved, but I kind of really like this one.

    The point of an HDRI is not only to provide a background image, but to also provide realistic lighting (IBL = Image Base Light) so the fact that the sky is not visible doesn't mean that a Skydome HDRI is not going to be very useful (there are Skydomes images for all times of day and night). In fact, there are also HDRI that provide only light information and can be attached to emissive meshes.

    Post edited by Daedalus-7 on
  • RurisRuris Posts: 118
    Ruris said:

     

    Sorry, I didn't see your question.  I added a layer in Photoshop, basically a photograph of a texture from a wall, using a soft light blend mode.  Texturizing is a digital art technique that kind of adds a bit of interest to an otherwise flat art image.  You can also use it to make your image look like it was painted on a cracked surface, for example.  The one I used I purchased from Brooke Shaden.

    Hi,

    Thanks. Have not really experimented with other blend mode.

  • OMG I am cracking up because I used to have those end tables, in real life, swear!

    I just used to have a cat like that. smiley

  • Sisyphus1977Sisyphus1977 Posts: 304
    edited September 2019

    dtrscbrutal said:

    The only thing I have is you might want to try to add some gravity effect to the sleeve.

    What can I say, Dforce and me have had an unstable relationship at best.  When I think all is going along fine, out of the blue, BOOM!!  An explosion and things just go from bad to worse.  We decide to give each other space and separate for a bit, then for some strange reason, I say okay, I will give it a try again.  And guess what, BOOM, again.  So for now I have decided to just leave Dforce be.

    I made some changes to the sleeve geometry to try and reflect gravity a bit, probably should have exported the shirt as an obj and try in Blender to morph it and import it back. 

    Anyway, here is my final version.

    Selfie DOF v2.jpg
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    Post edited by Sisyphus1977 on
  • RurisRuris Posts: 118

    Hi,

    Does anyone here render in Canvas-Beauty? It seems the dynamic range is better when imported into Photoshop. Maybe I'm wrong and its just the PS HDR tuning that cause it to be different.

  • Daedalus-7Daedalus-7 Posts: 116
    edited September 2019

    @Ruris I think rendering in Canvas saves files in a format that allows for better dynamic range (EXR file format or something like that), although I haven't experimented with that yet. You can also use the Canvas to render each light (environmental + extra lights) separately, and then blend them together in Photoshop to give you even more control on each light. The technique is detailed here, if you are interested:

    Part 1: How to prepare in DAZ Sudio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iaLpdZvbOcc 

    Part 2: How to process in Photoshop: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O14yNn79or4


    @Sisyphus1977 dForce works incredibly fast in the new version of DAZ but, if you have a blowing effect on clothes it's usually some option that needs tweaking. Something very useful could be:

    https://www.daz3d.com/dforce-master-cloth-simulation-presets

    https://www.daz3d.com/dforce-master-hair-simulation-presets-for-dforce-cloth-engine

    which allows you to quickly apply dForce parameters without having to learn & experiment with all of them. Here's an example that I quickly put together (dForce simulation for the dress took only 2-3 minutes).


    @TigerAnne Notice that I'm using light only from the HDRI, nothing else. Gives great shadows too!

    dForce Dress.jpg
    1920 x 1080 - 613K
    Post edited by Daedalus-7 on
  • One last version of my second idea befor the end of the month. Adjusted the transport's landing skids, did some texture work, added a character climing amung the rubble, and tried to tweek the DoF. Also tweeked the bloom settings.

    sept2019-2c.png
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  • L'AdairL'Adair Posts: 9,461

    Not that you folks really need it, but just a reminder today is the last day of the month and renders need to posted by Daz Midnight tonight (currently GMT - 6).

  • GordigGordig Posts: 4,200
    daedalus7 said:

    @TigerAnne Notice that I'm using light only from the HDRI, nothing else. Gives great shadows too!

    Yes, but you're also suffering the drawbacks of using an HDRI: rather than have proper DOF, ONLY the character is in focus, which looks really unnatural. Also, the shadow isn't reacting to the wall like it should.

  • glass ball with small glass balls with DOF in IRAY and a 3d software of my choice

    ENTRY 1

    glassball_01.jpeg
    2000 x 2000 - 856K
  • glass ball with small glass balls with DOF in IRAY and a 3d software of my choice

    ENTRY 2

    glassball_02.jpeg
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  • Daedalus-7Daedalus-7 Posts: 116
    edited October 2019
    Gordig said:
    daedalus7 said:

    Yes, but you're also suffering the drawbacks of using an HDRI: rather than have proper DOF, ONLY the character is in focus, which looks really unnatural. Also, the shadow isn't reacting to the wall like it should.

    You are right, in general HDRIs can have that limitation about FOV [everything looks super blurry except the character] but there are also HDRI that support FOV (like the one I am using in this example) so the blur effect is intentional and natural (it increases with distance from the camera, and you might notice the shadows in the foreground are quite sharp too). 

    Also, you can use props to get reflections and proper shadows on an HDRI image. Here's an example product that recently came out:

    https://www.daz3d.com/iray-hdri-tookit


    EDIT: Fixed my image. Now you can see proper shadows on the wall, as well as a less pronounced FOV effect on the windows.

    Woman in Red.jpg
    1920 x 1080 - 787K
    Post edited by Daedalus-7 on
  • rcbcgreenpanzerrcbcgreenpanzer Posts: 99
    edited September 2019

    Court Meeting Mk3:

    Court Meeting Mk3

    After a spending some time trying to get sunlight through the windows to do everything I wanted, eventually I gave up and switched the environment to something a bit less direct. In its place, I boosted both the luminosity and the temperature of the existing emmissive surfaces (except the fireplaces. Those stay dim and warm.) I also adjusted the focal point as I felt that too much was in focus before - it was keeping both people sharp even though one is really close. Finally, I toned down the glowing-hot flower to the point where I'm not sure how much the emissiveness still affects the image. I probably should have turned that off to see, as there's almost certainly plenty of light now. What issues do you guys see? Attached is the progression. (At least, the snapshots that got rendered.) Where would you guys have taken a different path?

    19-09_Court_Meeting_Mk0.jpg
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    19-09_Court_Meeting_Mk1.jpg
    1920 x 1200 - 1M
    19-09_Court_Meeting_Mk2.jpg
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    19-09_Court_Meeting_Mk3.jpg
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    Post edited by rcbcgreenpanzer on
  • Daedalus-7Daedalus-7 Posts: 116
    edited October 2019

    After a spending some time trying to get sunlight through the windows to do everything I wanted, eventually I gave up and switched the environment to something a bit less direct. In its place, I boosted both the luminosity and the temperature of the existing emmissive surfaces (except the fireplaces. Those stay dim and warm.) I also adjusted the focal point as I felt that too much was in focus before - it was keeping both people sharp even though one is really close. Finally, I toned down the glowing-hot flower to the point where I'm not sure how much the emissiveness still affects the image. I probably should have turned that off to see, as there's almost certainly plenty of light now. What issues do you guys see? Attached is the progression. (At least, the snapshots that got rendered.) Where would you guys have taken a different path?

    I like the last image (the rose seems just right), although there are merits for all other images too. Overall I can tell you that lighting 3d interiors is hard, and the one time that I did it, I did it with lots of emissive meshes with an IBL (image base lighting) attached to each of them, plus plenty of lights on the character.  Finally, I changed the mood by adjusting the exposure in the tone mapping. 

    Post edited by Daedalus-7 on
  • Hi LAdair. thank you for the great tips. Will play around with them when i have more time.

  • Hi everyone... well... this is my entry.

    Happy hour it's calledwink

    Used CSP to merge the layers (rendered the characters separately due to make the process faster) and Luminar to take out the noise (sorry, tooooo pixeled). 

    Happy to be back again (very creative art, everyone!)

    Lots of sunshine and a very productive October.

    Happy hour.png
    1600 x 900 - 2M
  • GordigGordig Posts: 4,200

    I think your DOF is a little too extreme. I'd open the F-stop a little wider so the other characters are more in focus, or at least the fairy.

  • L'AdairL'Adair Posts: 9,461

    This challenge is now closed.


    Thanks to everyone for participating!

  • Hi, @Gording, thanks for the critique. 
    I was curious when I first rendered it, so I'd tried previously to render the fairy without any DOF and the results were the same. Perhaps it is due to the renders settings and also her size and location considering the camera position(?)... as it was what I was getting, I decided to make it all very dramatic and have a childish time...

    I'm definitely going to play a lot with this feature...love it! winkThis is my first time discovering and trying DOF (since Friday thanks to the challenge!) and I'd been experimenting with it in almost every raw render I'm working on so far... only the basis, nothing fancy... lol... I enjoy the process if it is mostly intuitive... 

    Thanks again for your comment, hope mine makes sense...cheeky

     

     

     

     

     

  • LinwellyLinwelly Posts: 5,070

    Here is a little noticefor you: 

    the announcement of the challenge winners will be a bit late this month, but you were not forgotten.

    Thanks for your patience!

  • Kismet2012Kismet2012 Posts: 4,068

    Surreal Reality - Given to the person who used Depth of Field in a way that made the artwork feel realistic.

    The New User we felt best showed that this month was Open Story

     

    I See You - Given to the person who used Depth of Field in a way that made the main subject of the focal point and made them "pop".

    The New User we felt best showed that this month was Gordig

     

    In the Deep - Given to the person that used Depth of Field in a way that made the environment seem vast and sweeping.

    The New User we felt best showed that this month was Cinus

     


    New User Welcome

    katiedelongwriter

     

    Zatetic

  • Kismet2012Kismet2012 Posts: 4,068

    Everyone did a wonderful job in the DOF Challenge.  All the CV's commented on how difficult it was to narrow down our choices.  We all had multiple images for each category.

    Well done, everyone.

     

  • Congrats winners and to all the participants!  Great entries this month.

  • WinterMoonWinterMoon Posts: 1,633

    Congratulations to everyone! yes

  • DaventakiDaventaki Posts: 1,147

    Congratulations everyone!

  • Congrats to all!!!
  • Kaye KayeKaye Kaye Posts: 189

    Argh, I stopped getting notifications...

    Congratulations everyone!

     

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