How can I create a shader (Iray light) in Daz studio?

Hello,
I'm trying to create a light shader (daz studio iray), but, I'm lost in this fight.
My attention is on having these options on the surface tab:
1- lumens (flux)
2- color temperature
3- diffuse color / or any other option that changes the color of light ... Along with color temperature.
I have some shaders lights, like those of nvidia materials (mdl).
I also have the emissive shader that comes by default in daz studio.
But I wanted to create a shader that had the parameters (lumen flux, color temperature, and a third option that could change color like when applying a diffuse color to a model.
In Mix shader I can not find the lumens (flux), or color temperature ...
when I add a light in the scene (menu / create / light), I can see lumens / color temperature "of that light", but in the PARAMETERS tab ... This does not appear in the SURFACE tab ...

... How could I have lumen flux, color temperature, of a light, on the surface tab? ... Without copying the work of others?

Thanks

Comments

  • DivamakeupDivamakeup Posts: 8,720

    As soon as you turn the object's "Emission Color" to white (or any other color other than black) in the Surfaces Tab you should see new options pop up under it in the surfaces tab that let you change the emission temperature/color, luminance, etc.

  • ArtiniArtini Posts: 4,004
    edited January 6

    If you apply iray UberShader to the surface and change "Emission Color to something else, than Black,

    you will see that the surface with such material will emit the light.

    It was easier for me to switch "Luminance Units" to "kcd/m^2" to see the light with default values.

    I have left "Base Color" and "Glossy Color" with White, but have noticed that changing "Base Color" to the same as "Emission Color"

    will give even better light. Please look att my surface settings and an example render with them.

    image

    image

    SettingsLight01.jpg
    440 x 1028 - 105K
    Win201pic06.jpg
    1300 x 1000 - 148K
    Post edited by Artini on
  • ArtiniArtini Posts: 4,004
    edited January 6

    Lumens does not take to account area of the light surface, so it is harder to find the value, which works well.

    Ok, switched Rendering Settings to "Scene Only" and "Enironment Intensity" to 0, to see that the surface really produce the light.

    image

    Win202pic03.jpg
    1300 x 1000 - 121K
    Post edited by Artini on
  • ArtiniArtini Posts: 4,004
    edited January 8

    Just made a test with 3 spheres with diameter 1 cm, 10 cm and 50 cm

    and applied to them the same emissive material with "Luminance" of 805 lumens and "Emission Temperature" 2700 K.

    As you can see the light is getting weaker, if the area of the emitting surface is getting larger,

    and one uses lumens as "Luminance Units".

    image

    Win205pic01.jpg
    1300 x 1000 - 100K
    Post edited by Artini on
  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 1,104

    Many thanks for the tips.
    I'll test what you suggest, and tomorrow I post the result back here.
    One thing I need to say:
    When I create / add a light (menu / create / light), the "lumens (flux)" and "color temperature" are there in the tab parameters ... These properties do not appear on the surface tab , just in tab parameters.
    But I'll test and I'll come back to you.

  • ArtiniArtini Posts: 4,004
    edited January 7

    If you create a light using (menu / create / light) the "lumens (flux)" and "color temperature" are there in the tab parameters,

    but I thought, that you wish to change the surface to allow it to emit the light.

    There are two different ways to create light sources in Daz Studio:

    1. Create a light using (menu / create / light)

    or

    2. Choosing the surface of the object and applying to it iray Uber shader (or mdl from example Nvidia materials)

    and then changing "Emission Color" to something else, than Black.

    Please post a screenshot of your surface tab, to see what is the difference to the one, I see on my computer.

    Post edited by Artini on
  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 1,104
    Artini said:

    If you create a light using (menu / create / light) the "lumens (flux)" and "color temperature" are there in the tab parameters,

    but I thought, that you wish to change the surface to allow it to emit the light.

    There are two different ways to create light sources in Daz Studio:

    1. Create a light using (menu / create / light)

    or

    2. Choosing the surface of the object and applying to it iray Uber shader (or mdl from example Nvidia materials)

    and then changing "Emission Color" to something else, than Black.

    Please post a screenshot of your surface tab, to see what is the difference to the one, I see on my computer.

     

    Artini said:

    If you create a light using (menu / create / light) the "lumens (flux)" and "color temperature" are there in the tab parameters,

    but I thought, that you wish to change the surface to allow it to emit the light.

    There are two different ways to create light sources in Daz Studio:

    1. Create a light using (menu / create / light)

    or

    2. Choosing the surface of the object and applying to it iray Uber shader (or mdl from example Nvidia materials)

    and then changing "Emission Color" to something else, than Black.

    Please post a screenshot of your surface tab, to see what is the difference to the one, I see on my computer.

    Hi
      Here nvidia vmaterials lights, these lights derived from MDL have their lumens (flux) and color temperature on the "flap surface".
    I know I can copy / save this shader, and then have my shader with lumens (flux) and color temperature ... But I wanted to know how to create these options, instead of copying them ...
    The emissive you mentioned, I'm going to give you another test on them today and see if I get close to what I wanted ... I'll get back to you today

    lumens.jpg
    1920 x 1080 - 334K
  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 1,104

    Indeed! you're right!!!
    I applied an emissive shader (that emissive iray pattern that comes with daz), although, the options have different names, this seems to work using:
    "Luminance units = im"...

  • WonderlandWonderland Posts: 3,503
    edited January 7

    This is a product I purchased a long time ago before I knew what I was doing but then realized it was very to do yourself. If you want something easy that you can also learn from, you can get https://www.daz3d.com/simple-emissive-light-shaders-for-iray

    Post edited by Wonderland on
  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 1,104

    This is a product I purchased a long time ago before I knew what I was doing but then realized it was very to do yourself. If you want something easy that you can also learn from, you can get https://www.daz3d.com/simple-emissive-light-shaders-for-iray

    Thanks for the tip. I've been using iray shader since 2017, but I've never tried to create one on my own. And those bricks of the mix shader ... I was kind of lost.
    The fact is, I do not want to illuminate anything! What I want is to use the light shader to color / paint / replace the texture of a 3d model with the light shader ... For in order to create flat style cartoons vectors, in the iray render of 3d characters etc etc ....
    a flat 2d look of 3d models.
    I'm finally getting it.

  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 1,104
    edited January 8

    Here, the first results of 2d look,the 3d model, and then its render look 2d style after light shader emission / config :

    car.jpg
    1965 x 1267 - 551K
    doutor pitterbil.jpg
    1965 x 1267 - 741K
    Post edited by jorge dorlando on
  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 1,104

    And here another:

     

    robtoon.jpg
    1730 x 1534 - 451K
  • ArtiniArtini Posts: 4,004
    edited January 8

    Nice. I did not thought, that such a shader could give the object flat, cartoon look.

    This is another approach to get the NPR look, which is great.

    Post edited by Artini on
  • Sven DullahSven Dullah Posts: 3,503
    Artini said:

    Just made a test with 3 spheres with diameter 1 cm, 10 cm and 50 cm

    and applied to them the same emissive material with "Luminance" of 805 lumens and "Emission Temperature" 2700 K.

    As you can see the light is getting weaker, if the area of the emitting surface is getting larger,

    and one uses lumens as "Luminance Units".

    image

    Sidenote;) As a person who doesn't use IRay, kind of baffled by the fact a larger surface emits weaker light. Is not this a pbr renderer? surprise

  • EsemwyEsemwy Posts: 554
    Artini said:

    Just made a test with 3 spheres with diameter 1 cm, 10 cm and 50 cm

    and applied to them the same emissive material with "Luminance" of 805 lumens and "Emission Temperature" 2700 K.

    As you can see the light is getting weaker, if the area of the emitting surface is getting larger,

    and one uses lumens as "Luminance Units".

    image

    Sidenote;) As a person who doesn't use IRay, kind of baffled by the fact a larger surface emits weaker light. Is not this a pbr renderer? surprise

    “Luminance” in Iray can be applied using several metrics. Lumens in particular are not dependant on the size of the luminous surface. The surfaces in your picture are putting out the same absolute amount of light with that light being spread evenly across the surface. See this explanation.

  • Sven DullahSven Dullah Posts: 3,503
    Esemwy said:
    Artini said:

    Just made a test with 3 spheres with diameter 1 cm, 10 cm and 50 cm

    and applied to them the same emissive material with "Luminance" of 805 lumens and "Emission Temperature" 2700 K.

    As you can see the light is getting weaker, if the area of the emitting surface is getting larger,

    and one uses lumens as "Luminance Units".

    image

    Sidenote;) As a person who doesn't use IRay, kind of baffled by the fact a larger surface emits weaker light. Is not this a pbr renderer? surprise

    “Luminance” in Iray can be applied using several metrics. Lumens in particular are not dependant on the size of the luminous surface. The surfaces in your picture are putting out the same absolute amount of light with that light being spread evenly across the surface. See this explanation.

    Ok tks for explainingyes

  • Oso3DOso3D Posts: 13,326

    In my Oso Toon, this is how 'flat color' is achieved; it sends the normal color map to emission color and adjusts it so you get, well, a flat color.

    Though the way I have it set up, it doesn't have shadows, so that's interesting.

     

  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 1,104

    here a render standard iray, and another style flat of emissive shader  :

     

     

     

     

     

    sci.png
    1920 x 1080 - 117K
    sci0.png
    711 x 400 - 268K
  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 1,104
    edited January 8

    It´s will work fine for motion graphics

     

    I forgot how to post images in body text, instead of this tumbinals

    Post edited by jorge dorlando on
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