Depth of field settings

Hi I’ve been playing around with the manual dof settings under the editor tab.

I understand what F/Stop is but in the setting it’s shown as a rather high number which I don’t understand as usually the lens f stop would be somewhere between f2.0 to f10 to be usable on lens.

Are there any tips or pointers on tutorials for Daz in relation to the camera settings would be most helpful please.

Comments

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 28,899

    TBH   the best advice I can give you is to go over and check out some of the WIP threads in the New User Challenge Forum.   Each month they do a challenge on a feature of DS. and the September Challenge was on DOF 

    https://www.daz3d.com/forums/discussion/275036/september-2018-daz-3d-new-user-challenge-depth-of-field

  • MaraunMaraun Posts: 5

    i noticed too, fstop don't correspond with real life camera or others render engine.

    Just do render test to get the right value.

  • MattymanxMattymanx Posts: 5,511
    edited November 9

    The DS camera is not a physical camera, so it is not limited to physical limts.

     

    I have noticed that I sometimes need really high fstop values just to get enough in focus.  Dont know why as every scene is differnt.

    Post edited by Mattymanx on
  • FishtalesFishtales Posts: 3,501

    DOF is a combination of Focal Length, Zoom, Focal Distance and F/stop to get the amount of sharp area you want and the amount of blur in the background and foreground. It is possible to use real life F/stop settings if you then use the other settings to get the amount of sharp area required.

  • Serefina_MoonSerefina_Moon Posts: 76
    edited November 13
    Fishtales said:

    DOF is a combination of Focal Length, Zoom, Focal Distance and F/stop to get the amount of sharp area you want and the amount of blur in the background and foreground.,..

    Don't forget the sensor size setting - Default in studio is 'Full Frame' - same as a "135 format" camera, where the 35mm film strip runs sideways through the camera body, and the frames longest side follows the length of the film strip.


    For the 'Cinema Look', reset the sensor size to 23mm, and it'll be easier to get a deep D.o.F. for most uses - it's similar to Super35 cinema cameras where the film runs vertically through the gate, and where the frame goes across the width of the film strip.


    A setting of around 6mm will give a look like an action camera or phone.

    Setting it to around 65mm will give a Medium Format Film look - similar to cinema's 70mm, and very close to what is used by fashion magazines,... and will be crazy hard to get sharp focus.

     

    Post edited by Serefina_Moon on
  • JonnyRayJonnyRay Posts: 788

    As much as the photographer in me dislikes the way that exposure control works in Studio, I have to admit that I'm really impressed with the camera control and what we can do with it. I hadn't even played with the sensor size. Thanks for the tip, @Serefina_Moon!

  • MattymanxMattymanx Posts: 5,511
    edited November 13

    Don't forget the sensor size setting - Default in studio is 'Full Frame' - same as a "135 format" camera, where the 35mm film strip runs sideways through the camera body, and the frames longest side follows the length of the film strip.


    For the 'Cinema Look', reset the sensor size to 23mm, and it'll be easier to get a deep D.o.F. for most uses - it's similar to Super35 cinema cameras where the film runs vertically through the gate, and where the frame goes across the width of the film strip.


    A setting of around 6mm will give a look like an action camera or phone.

    Setting it to around 65mm will give a Medium Format Film look - similar to cinema's 70mm, and very close to what is used by fashion magazines,... and will be crazy hard to get sharp focus.

     

    Thank you for the info.  Never bothered with it before since it always defaulted to 35mm.

     

    EDIT:

    Been playing with the sensor size and though you can get a narrower DOF, you still have to compensate with the focal length to avoid distortion.  So in the end, it can look just the same as 35mm but have more or less DOF.

    Post edited by Mattymanx on
  • IIRC, 35mm on APSc (23mm sensor), 50mm lens on 35mm sensor, and about 90 or 105mm's on Medium Format sized sensor, will all result in very similar Feild of View, but with very different Depth of Feild.

     

    Thing is, with all of these, it's all subjective to what looks good to your eye, change it to make it look good to you ;)

  • FishtalesFishtales Posts: 3,501

    Sensor size and frame size are two different things. Frame size is the aspect ratio of the film used not the size of the sensor. Sensor size governs how many pixels on the sensor are available for the image. A full size sensor is equivalent to 35mm film which generally means there are no overlapping pixels on the sensor so the image looks sharper, it works out at ~6K I think. Setting the frame size to 77mm rather than 35mm changes the aspect ratio from 1.35:1 (35mm) to 2.2:1 (75mm) which can be done in the render settings you then can set the pixel sizes to whatever size of image you want at that aspect ratio, the digital equivalent is~12K/~13K I think..

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