Does anyone use Carrara for Modeling?

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Comments

  • KixumKixum Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    I have modeled 99.9% of everything I have rendered. Modeling is the most fun part of what I do.

    It's funny how people think that I got my stuff from other places but actually, it's all my models.

    I would say that Carrara's modeling tool set is very good but it has limitations.

    In my article on the Enterprise in issue 10 of c3dexpo, I mention that generating a mesh that would have lots of windows on a curved surface would be pretty hard to make. Such a thing is probably easiest with booleans but that is always hazardous.

    On a side note, I wrote a whole tutorial on booleans once but I haven't finished it! I need to go back for that.

    The metaball modeler is ok but it would sure be super nice to have a simple xyz coordinate for each "ball" that could be numerically edited so that it would be a lot easier to line metaballs up. As it is right now, you can't even put a ball in and set it at 0,0,0 without a bunch of trouble.

    There are some basic functions that the vertex modeler could use. It would be pretty cool if the full hex functions were built into c. Unfortunately, hex is an amapi construct and the coding is really different.

    Even simple things like symmetric modeling in c are wonky. It would be nice to fix that some.

    To summarize, I would say that c is in general a nice vertex modeler. As for nurbs, the spline modeler is pretty cool but it has serious limits. If you fuss with the spline modeler long enough, you can make a lot of stuff really fast and easy.

    As for a learning curve goes, I think it's comparable to other vertex modelers.

    I also agree that for organic models, zbrush has significant advantages. For most of my stuff, it's machines and ships and buildings and stuff like that which c works very well for me.

  • DartanbeckDartanbeck Posts: 14,774
    edited December 1969

    That is so cool to read that, which you've just said! I really enjoy that article in C3DE, and love the work you've done. Bravo, awesome Carraraist!

  • HeadwaxHeadwax Posts: 7,758
    edited December 1969

    Kixum wroteth :

    On a side note, I wrote a whole tutorial on booleans once but I haven’t finished it! I need to go back for that.

    looking forward to that.
    !

  • JoeMamma2000JoeMamma2000 Posts: 2,615
    edited December 1969

    I have long been a critic of the Carrara modeller, and, understandably, receive a lot of flack for criticizing it. I know that some get quite offended when you criticize their choice of software, and I apologize for the comments. But my point has never been that it is evil and something to be avoided or that it is bad and useless. Because it's not. Heck, you can model ANYTHING with ANY 3D modeller. All you need to do is punch in each individual vertex, connect them with edges, and you have it. :)

    The point is, does it have the features that minimize and mechanize the "low value", "grunt" work you need to do? And is it designed in a way that makes the modelling process easy for you?

    Personally (and this is just me) I find the design of the modeller counter-intuitive and difficult to use. I just don't like it.

    And based on a lot of experience with other modellers, I find Carrara's modeller to be extremely limiting, feature-wise. And many of the features it does have are, for me, difficult to get successful results with. Doesn't mean you CAN'T get successful results, just that, for me, it takes a lot of work that I shouldn't have to do. Rule #1 of software: It should do the useless grunt work, and leave you free to do the artistic work. :)

    Understandably, Carrara is a full featured, jack-of-all-trades application designed for hobbyists, so realistically you can't expect it to be a master in any particular area.

    Anyway, specifically, my big issues are with the UV mapping (difficult, inconsistent), bad mesh detection and repair features (nonexistent), counter-intuitive implementation, lack of some basic tools, and a bunch of other stuff that escapes me right now since it's been a while since I've really used it. But when the first thing you do in the app is load a simple cube vertex object and it gives you an 8x8x8 cube that you immediately have to change the "object definition" for (after you remember what that means...), it's headache time.... :)

    But yeah, for me, if I have to throw together a quick, simple object, I'll use the Carrara modeller. And if I have an object in the scene and I need to tweak it I might use Carrara, since the Assemble room modeller is a nice feature. But otherwise, using it to make anything even slightly complex makes my brain explode.

  • 3dView3dView Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    I have always thought Carrara's modeling was limited and not good enough then I saw some of mcguivers stuff and realized it was much more a case of operator error then I would like to admit.

    Smiles.

    Rich

  • evilproducerevilproducer Posts: 9,018
    edited December 1969

    I would add (if I haven't already ;-) ) that there is more in Carrara's modeling stable than the vertex modeler. There is the spline modeler, which I've used quite a bit, and the meta-ball modeler, which I've used less, but has come in very handy on occasion.

  • scottidog2scottidog2 Posts: 314
    edited December 1969

    JoeMamma2000, I tend to agree with your thoughts. I was following Phil's wonderful training video on modeling in Carrara but found the whole experience frustrating. (interface, limited toolset, UV mapping). I am learning Cinema 4D as the workflow is just amazing and there are many training videos out. Carrara has its unique features/functions that I simply cannot do without and I aim to combine that with C4D.

  • Jetbird D2Jetbird D2 Posts: 75
    edited December 1969

    hey guys, missed you too!
    Sorry I am not around lately these days.
    Each day life gets more and more complicated. I am working on some projects that were supposed to bring some stability to my life but turned out quite the opposite.


    Anyway, hopefully more and more people will find and try out Carrara's modeling tools and will find them useful as I did. Even with its limitations compared to some other software, it allows for some really speedy and good modeling compared to other workflows (although that really depends on what you are modeling :) )

  • edited December 1969

    I've read most of this thread (not all), so I don't think anyone has mentioned Carrara's use for kit bashing.

    To stay in one program (as Dartan mentioned) is a real bonus. For hacking about with models, and coming up with something that is a combo of models (plus adding a bit of your own stuff) it's pretty fast - proving the model it's self is not too large.

    I've spent from May 2011 to now mainly in the modeller and playing with lighting in Carrara. I've developed a number of tactics for speeding work up.

    There are a number of things I'd like to see in the modeller that would take some of the pain out of removing items / shaders from models.

    As usual when ever I get stuck / experience a long painful session(s) I do a tutorial. I plan to do more carrara modelling tutorials. I expect it's a lifetime journey to reach your peak in this field.

  • otodomusotodomus Posts: 324
    edited December 1969

    8068 said:
    I do all my modeling in Carrara. No organic forms though ( no people animals or trees )
    Most of my objects are machines, or tools.
    I used to model in sketchup, or alibre and convert but I like to tweek too much, so staying in one program is huge for me.
    and avoiding file conversions removes a big PITA.
    I believe I can model pretty much anything I need at this point using both the vertex or spline modeler.
    8068

    Hello friend, could you post please some of your work? I am interested since I am an Industrial Designer and I am not modeling on Carrara, my models are made in Sketchup, but rendered in Carrara, the which is quite cool!

  • DartanbeckDartanbeck Posts: 14,774
    edited December 1969

    hey guys, missed you too!
    Sorry I am not around lately these days.
    Each day life gets more and more complicated. I am working on some projects that were supposed to bring some stability to my life but turned out quite the opposite.


    Anyway, hopefully more and more people will find and try out Carrara's modeling tools and will find them useful as I did. Even with its limitations compared to some other software, it allows for some really speedy and good modeling compared to other workflows (although that really depends on what you are modeling :) )

    Hopefully you can find a way to come back more often and do more of what it is that you do!
    I'm trying to work more toward that myself - even though I really have been finding ways to post fairly often this year... my mortal soul is whispering into my ear that I need to share some of my findings with using Carrara and Dogwaffle together. Well now Daz Studio Pro is creeping its way into my workflow as well. I'm seeing a really sweet suite here:
    Carrara 8.5 Pro, Daz Studio 4.(n) Pro, Project Dogwaffle Pro: Howler (soon to be 9)
    Add in whatever you normally use for photo/image editing and other production software - but those three are quite the bundle. If I could find the time to toss Bryce into the mix, I would. Reading through the manual is intriguing how you can build in there.

    Carrara is my baby - the major power behind all of it. I'm really glad that I've found Howler to assist with animation and free-form painting/drawing. Everybody has their thing...

    It sure would be cool to get you back into the thick of things though.

  • KixumKixum Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    I remember this thread from a long time ago.

    For fun, I thought I'd post a few pictures of my models which are 100% made in Carrara to show what Carrara's modeling tools can produce.

    -Kix

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  • KixumKixum Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Here's another.

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  • Rich GellesRich Gelles Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Nice jobs Kixum. Very sweet models.

    And just to add to to conversation I think we all forget sometimes all this stuff is just a tool. The real skill comes from the person holding the mouse or pen. And sure its obvious some other applications out there are way better modelers once again thought someone will show you stuff that could have made in anything.

    It may not be the most up to date feature rich modeler but Carrara Vertex and spline modelers certain can get it done. As Kixum so aptly shows us here and many others before.

    rich

  • KixumKixum Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Thanks for the comment!

    Here's another example.

    day8a.jpg
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  • KixumKixum Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    And another.

    Falcon_In_hanger_1280_Final.jpg
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  • KixumKixum Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Also, check out issue 10 of C3DExpo and see the Motion Picture Enterprise model that was 100% created in Carrara there.

    The Cylon base star was about 20 hours, the Cylon Raider was about 25 hours, the Bike was 15 hours, the Millenium Falcon was about 50 hours and the Enterprise was 70 hours.

    -Kix

  • DartanbeckDartanbeck Posts: 14,774
    edited December 1969

    Kixum said:
    Also, check out issue 10 of C3DExpo and see the Motion Picture Enterprise model that was 100% created in Carrara there.

    The Cylon base star was about 20 hours, the Cylon Raider was about 25 hours, the Bike was 15 hours, the Millenium Falcon was about 50 hours and the Enterprise was 70 hours.

    -Kix

    Fantastic! Bravo!
    All of those times are very impressive... only 15 hours on that killer bike?!!! Yikes is that good! I wanna ride that thing!
    But I think I'd still prefer a nice spin... okay... ride... in the Millennium Falcon.
    Very nice work, Kixum.

    In Oliver Twist's accent and apparent innocence:
    "Please, I want some more"

  • bighbigh Posts: 8,147
    edited December 1969

    Kixum said:
    Also, check out issue 10 of C3DExpo and see the Motion Picture Enterprise model that was 100% created in Carrara there.

    The Cylon base star was about 20 hours, the Cylon Raider was about 25 hours, the Bike was 15 hours, the Millenium Falcon was about 50 hours and the Enterprise was 70 hours.

    -Kix

    Fantastic! Bravo!
    All of those times are very impressive... only 15 hours on that killer bike?!!! Yikes is that good! I wanna ride that thing!
    But I think I'd still prefer a nice spin... okay... ride... in the Millennium Falcon.
    Very nice work, Kixum.

    In Oliver Twist's accent and apparent innocence:
    "Please, I want some more"

    what you Want more
    He Wants more

  • msolomonmsolomon Posts: 164
    edited October 2013

    I model in Carrara exclusively. I used to use hexagon along with Carrara but I really like using a single app. Though I enjoy Hex alot modeling in Carrara is more convenient for me. Most of my work is character design but all the other models I did in Carrara also. Renders in Carrara also.

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    Post edited by msolomon on
  • KixumKixum Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Cool looking character models!

    Here's some more stuff from the library. The most complicated part of this model is actually the hands (several hundred parts).

    image326.jpg
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  • KixumKixum Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Here's the Enterprise bridge (1000's of individual buttons that took a while!).

    image253.jpg
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  • KixumKixum Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    I have read a lot of posts in lots of different Carrara forums which talk about Carrara's modeling pros and cons. What I conclude is basically the following.

    1.) Learning a modeling tool is directly related to the power of the tool. The more powerful a tool is, the harder it is to learn.
    2.) People usually invest some significant effort into learning a tool and then they kind of stick with it. This makes a lot of sense because of the investment of it. Consequently, there's not a gigantic Carrara modeling force out there because Carrara isn't particularly or specifically sold as a modeling tool. That doesn't change the fact that you can actually make pretty complex things with Carrara if you want. I've worked with Carrara since day zero and I've learned and adopted it as time has marched forward. Consequently, Carrara is my modeling tool just because I know it and clearly, I can get results out of it.
    3.) In terms of speed, I think any tool is fast if it it's used by a skilled user for the kind of model it's designed to make (nurb, vertex, metaball, etc.).
    4.) Carrara has limitations just like every other tool out there. I am always a little frustrated with how people hack on the limitations since there is always another tool out there that can do some specific thing better. Like every other tool out there, Carrara can also use some improvements but this will be true forever no matter what changes or upgrades would ever be made (it's just the nature of software).
    5.) I'm convinced that with a combination of texturing and modeling, pretty much anything that's needed can be realized. Some things might not be perfect and some things can't be done. However, the categories of things which Carrara can't handle aren't many and you can get a LOT of results with some time and effort.

  • evilproducerevilproducer Posts: 9,018
    edited December 1969

    Kixum said:
    I have read a lot of posts in lots of different Carrara forums which talk about Carrara's modeling pros and cons. What I conclude is basically the following.

    1.) Learning a modeling tool is directly related to the power of the tool. The more powerful a tool is, the harder it is to learn.
    2.) People usually invest some significant effort into learning a tool and then they kind of stick with it. This makes a lot of sense because of the investment of it. Consequently, there's not a gigantic Carrara modeling force out there because Carrara isn't particularly or specifically sold as a modeling tool. That doesn't change the fact that you can actually make pretty complex things with Carrara if you want. I've worked with Carrara since day zero and I've learned and adopted it as time has marched forward. Consequently, Carrara is my modeling tool just because I know it and clearly, I can get results out of it.
    3.) In terms of speed, I think any tool is fast if it it's used by a skilled user for the kind of model it's designed to make (nurb, vertex, metaball, etc.).
    4.) Carrara has limitations just like every other tool out there. I am always a little frustrated with how people hack on the limitations since there is always another tool out there that can do some specific thing better. Like every other tool out there, Carrara can also use some improvements but this will be true forever no matter what changes or upgrades would ever be made (it's just the nature of software).
    5.) I'm convinced that with a combination of texturing and modeling, pretty much anything that's needed can be realized. Some things might not be perfect and some things can't be done. However, the categories of things which Carrara can't handle aren't many and you can get a LOT of results with some time and effort.

    Thank you and hallelujah! Someone else that feels the same way that I do!

  • JonstarkJonstark Posts: 2,391
    edited December 1969

    Kixum, that is incredible work! I've seen your renders over at Rendo and always been bowled over by how detailed and realistic and complex your modeling is. One glance at what you've been able to do should immediately silence critics who maintain Carrara can't be used as an effective modeler! :)

    As evident by this thread, I'm brand new to learning modeling, but having fun doing so in Carrara. I took a shot at trying to model something in Hex a couple years back and felt utterly defeated at the time, but now that I'm experimenting with modeling again in Carrara I'm having a much different and much more positive experience. I absolutely agree with every point you made, and it makes me glad that I'm learning modeling in Carrara as my choice of modeling app, not just because if I learn to model in Carrara I won't have to jump back and forth to other modelers and export/re-import etc (much more convenient to do it all in one app) but also because I find Carrara more intuitive and easy to use in pretty much all respects, and so far modeling is no different.

    Anyway, just fantastic work, and I 100% agree with what Evil said: Hallelujah, someone that feels the same way I do :)

  • KixumKixum Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Thanks very much for the comments!

    There are many examples of people who have generated excellent models. We just don't show them off as much as we should.

    There are more examples of my stuff over at Renderosity if there is interest. As most people know, 99.9% of everything I render is modeled by me which means my stuff is different than what most people render with C.

    Enjoy.

    -Kix

  • msolomonmsolomon Posts: 164
    edited December 1969

    Using Carrara professionaly can be an interesting experience. I get complements from other pros until they find out what software I use. The conversation usually goes as follows:

    -Wow, your modeling and animation is excellent.
    -Thanks
    -You must use Maya.
    -Nope
    -Studio max, Light Wave,
    -Nope, Carrara.
    -( awkward pause ) oh ( awkward pause ) you should upgrade to Maya. Your work would be much better.

    I kid you not, I get the same comments all the time.

    I once had a Hollywood studio hire me to model 4 complete anthropamorphic characters in 5 weeks for one of their corporate clients. After I turned the job in, on time, the owner confessed he could've only completed one complex character in 2 weeks using Maya. Yet, he never hired me again.
    Inspite of Carrara's obvious capabilities, it is constantly considered a toy to pros rooted in industry standard.

  • msolomonmsolomon Posts: 164
    edited December 1969

    Kixum said:
    Cool looking character models!

    Here's some more stuff from the library. The most complicated part of this model is actually the hands (several hundred parts).

    Kixum, your work is further proof that Carrara is truly a professional tool and not a toy. Well Done!

  • DartanbeckDartanbeck Posts: 14,774
    edited December 1969

    Kixum said:
    Thanks very much for the comments!

    There are many examples of people who have generated excellent models. We just don't show them off as much as we should.

    There are more examples of my stuff over at Renderosity if there is interest. As most people know, 99.9% of everything I render is modeled by me which means my stuff is different than what most people render with C.

    Enjoy.

    -KixThat's awesome!

    Using Carrara professionaly can be an interesting experience. I get complements from other pros until they find out what software I use. The conversation usually goes as follows:

    -Wow, your modeling and animation is excellent.
    -Thanks
    -You must use Maya.
    -Nope
    -Studio max, Light Wave,
    -Nope, Carrara.
    -( awkward pause ) oh ( awkward pause ) you should upgrade to Maya. Your work would be much better.

    I kid you not, I get the same comments all the time.

    I once had a Hollywood studio hire me to model 4 complete anthropamorphic characters in 5 weeks for one of their corporate clients. After I turned the job in, on time, the owner confessed he could've only completed one complex character in 2 weeks using Maya. Yet, he never hired me again.
    Inspite of Carrara's obvious capabilities, it is constantly considered a toy to pros rooted in industry standard.

    That's sad!

    This is why I push Carrara so much. I really want to get this precious tool more notice and recognition within the industry.

  • SpacelandSpaceland Posts: 132
    edited December 1969

    Carrara is an underdog compare to the others, but I usually like to use underdog software and show to peoples.

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