lose rigging?

assmonkeyassmonkey Posts: 0
edited December 1969 in Hexagon Discussion

Do you lose the rigging if you send Genesis over to Hexagon or Z Brush?

Comments

  • BlackFeather1973BlackFeather1973 Posts: 739
    edited December 1969

    Yes and no.

    Yes, because Hexagon and Zbrush don't know rigging. They only operate on the mesh.
    No, you don't lose it, because if you send the mesh back to DazStudio you can turn it into morph for you rigged figure. Provided that you don't make any changes that change the vertex order or vertex count. If you add or delete vertices, you can't make it a morph and the mesh will become an unrigged figure.

  • assmonkeyassmonkey Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    What I was trying to do is add clothes onto Genesis? Not make them separate because for game models, I'm sure the clothes are modeled right on...I think

  • Tramp GraphicsTramp Graphics Posts: 2,391
    edited December 1969

    What I was trying to do is add clothes onto Genesis? Not make them separate because for game models, I'm sure the clothes are modeled right on...I think
    No, they're not. In many games, you can change your characters' clothing, and this requires that the clothes be separate figures fit to the character. They're not modeled as an integral part of the figure.
  • assmonkeyassmonkey Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    then what about hair? is that attached to their skull or no?

  • Tramp GraphicsTramp Graphics Posts: 2,391
    edited December 1969

    then what about hair? is that attached to their skull or no?
    Nope. For the same reasons.
  • assmonkeyassmonkey Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    What about...those character that are in the background and of no importance. They modeled any different (aside from getting a much lower poly count or whatever)

  • Tramp GraphicsTramp Graphics Posts: 2,391
    edited December 1969

    What about...those character that are in the background and of no importance. They modeled any different (aside from getting a much lower poly count or whatever)
    Nope.

    For example, look at the game Knights of the Old Republic. Every character in that game can change clothes, including the background characters. In fact, They use the same basic set of models for all of the background and minor characters, throughout the game, just changing their clothes and hair styles. And the PCs have a wide variety of ever increasing options for new clothes, armor, and weapons. They can even be stripped down to just their underwear (which is "second skin" type painted directly on to the skin texture). This is true of all of the SW games, as far as I know, including The Dark Forces games, among others. It's also true of the Skyrim games, The only types of game where that wouldn't necessarily be true is games like Mario.

  • assmonkeyassmonkey Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    You were just using examples of games where THEY do change clothes, those are games where they custom-ize them

    You're not using examples of...I don't, set characters you don't make in the start of the game. Like FF-like games where all the characters are already made

  • Tramp GraphicsTramp Graphics Posts: 2,391
    edited December 1969

    You were just using examples of games where THEY do change clothes, those are games where they custom-ize them

    You're not using examples of...I don't, set characters you don't make in the start of the game. Like FF-like games where all the characters are already made

    The clothes and hair are still separate "figures" fit to the characters. And yes, even in the Final Fantasy games we see characters in changing attire. For making background characters, and other minor characters, it's easier and cheaper to start with naked, "stock:" figures, and dress them in different costumes and different hair styles as needed to create variety than it is to make custom figures with permanently modeled clothes built into the base mesh as an integral part of the figure. Another reason for using a basic "nude" figure and dressing it with separate clothes is for anatomical accuracy so that the clothes drape and conform properly on the body. So, no, game developers don't permanently model the clothes and hair as a permanent part of the character, not even for minor background characters. That may have been the case back in the old "8-bit" days, but not in modern 3D games.
  • assmonkeyassmonkey Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    As far as I know...I don't know of any game with non-custom characters that even change clothes.

    Since rigging is clearly lost, how cna you keep it if you take it over for a game engine?

  • Tramp GraphicsTramp Graphics Posts: 2,391
    edited December 1969

    As far as I know...I don't know of any game with non-custom characters that even change clothes.

    Since rigging is clearly lost, how cna you keep it if you take it over for a game engine?

    Who says the rigging is lost? There is a reason why Daz requires game developers to pay for a special license to use their models (Such as the Genesis figure) in games. It is because all of the origiinal mesh and rigging is transferred into the game engine. Otherwise the characters couldn't move and interact. What we see in a game is not rendered images and animations, but, rather, the actual mesh figures and props moving in real time. And, secondly, the player doesn't need to be able to change the clothes, the animators, and game designers do. And that is why they use separate clothes and hair. It's much easier, and more natural looking. This is also true of drawing too. It's always better to start with the "nude", and then clothe the figure once the base anatomy and proportions are set.
  • assmonkeyassmonkey Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Oh

    well, thanks for explaining it to me

Sign In or Register to comment.