What is the EASIEST 3D Modelling Software?

The absolute easiest, fastest to learn, with the most user-friendly interface?

Thanks!

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Comments

  • ZBrush! Wait no, Blender!

    It really depends what you're doing, could you elaborate? ZBrush is fantastic for organics for example, not so much for precision modeling.

  • Literally none of them. They all have a learning curve, you just have to try them out and see what works best for you.

  • th3Digitth3Digit Posts: 15,495

    it took 2 years for Zbrush to actually click for me and I still suck in it!

    I got my second ever computer that was not windows 98 (which I had for a few months prior )in 2008 and learnt to use Sketchup the free version almost right away, so I would certainly suggest that as a free start but the mesh topography is pretty bleh.

    I myself use Carrara mostly and Zremesh the results.

  • kyoto kidkyoto kid Posts: 23,544

    ...the easiest with regards to a simple to learn/work with UI, layout, and toolset is Hexagon. The downside, it has stability issues that have not been addressed for years and is only 32 bit.

    Amapi was another that was a bit more robust than Hexagon yet still fairly easy to learn, but sadly it is no longer available.

    Both were originlly Eovia products and were dedicated modelling programmes without all the other bells & whistles which full feature programmes like 3DS Max, C4D, Blender, and others have that make them more complex and thus can be more difficult to learn.

  • RawArtRawArt Posts: 3,735

    Wings 3d  ....very basic program, simple logical interface

  • AllenArtAllenArt Posts: 1,790
    edited September 13

    I'd say Wings or Hexagon. I got a grip on Wings3D in a week - from not knowing how to model. After all these years I still use it, mostly because it's "comfy" LOL.

    Laurie

    Post edited by AllenArt on
  • agent unawaresagent unawares Posts: 1,054
    edited September 13
    th3Digit said:

    it took 2 years for Zbrush to actually click for me and I still suck in it!

    Like Blender ZBrush was kind of a joke response. I think they're the two best known examples of WTFUI in the industry. I use ZBrush for all my morphs/half my texture painting/sketching quick props but the interface still doesn't "click," send help.

    Post edited by agent unawares on
  • mjc1016mjc1016 Posts: 14,997

    Wings is pretty easy and basic...and free.

    And there are quite a few tutorials for it on Youtube.

  • McGyverMcGyver Posts: 2,248

    That depends on what you want to make and what your budget is.

    Just simple props for your own use... nothing too organic... SketchUp. My kids learned how to use it when they were 7 or 8... The big thing to remember with SU is keeping with quads (avoid Ngons) and watching that it doesn't flip the surface normals on you.

    For more complicated stuff... Hexagon if you want to wait until doomsday for a new version, or just bite the bullet and learn Blender... It's really not that hard if you don't already know how to model in other programs... If you do, just ignore what you already know.

    Silo is also pretty easy and it's often on sale for $20-$40.

     

  • divamakeupdivamakeup Posts: 4,408

    I got my feet wet with Sculptris - it's super easy to learn but you can't do a lot in the program. Maybe some simple morphs and 3D sculptures. I think there is a pretty steep learning curve for most other 3D modeling programs that I've tried though. Blender gives me a massive headache every time I sit down to try and learn it (but that might be more my fault than Blender as I just don't have the patience to sit through tutorials and I always try to figure things out on my own), but the plus side is that Blender is free and that there are quite a few tutorials for the program.

    Hubby got me ZBrush for my birthday so I was kind of forced to learn it. lol It's a pain in the bottom to learn but once you get the hang of it, it's like anything else, it gets easier with practice and repetition. To me, Blender and ZBrush are definitely not very "user-friendly" and you have to do quite a bit of studying to figure things out and to do even the simplest of things in the programs. In the end, whatever you chose you'll have to commit to some studying and learning - as none of the current programs (at least not the ones I've tried) are really intuitive or user-friendly.

  • GlenWebbGlenWebb Posts: 157
    RawArt said:

    Wings 3d  ....very basic program, simple logical interface

    Wings has been the easiest for me. Love using it...at least with 'rigid' models such as buildings, pottery, doors, windows, etc. Perhaps geometric models is a better term. 

    I used Amapi too. I think Wings is easier, but Amapi once you get used to it was pretty easy. Sad to hear it's no longer around. 

    I've never been able to get Hexagon to work, regardless of what computer I had. I sneeze, it crashes, I blink, it crashes, I breath, I move, basically I exist, and Hexagon crashes. I was hoping with a new computer there would be no issues, but they were only worse. Waste of money and time all those years of trying to get it to work right.

    Blender...I just stare at it. I refuse to ever allow it on another computer. I watched and read tutorials and still couldn't make sense of it. Seriously, I just don't get the hype. Perhaps it is meant for those who are already well versed in modelling and experienced at modelling. And perhaps for some of us, these things are way over our heads and we'll never understand it. I can't begin to think of the number of times I've tried Blender over the years. 

  • kyoto kidkyoto kid Posts: 23,544
    McGyver said:

    That depends on what you want to make and what your budget is.

    Just simple props for your own use... nothing too organic... SketchUp. My kids learned how to use it when they were 7 or 8... The big thing to remember with SU is keeping with quads (avoid Ngons) and watching that it doesn't flip the surface normals on you.

    For more complicated stuff... Hexagon if you want to wait until doomsday for a new version, or just bite the bullet and learn Blender... It's really not that hard if you don't already know how to model in other programs... If you do, just ignore what you already know.

    Silo is also pretty easy and it's often on sale for $20-$40.

     

    ...SIlo also has a 64 bit version.

  • kyoto kidkyoto kid Posts: 23,544
    edited September 13
    GlenWebb said:
    RawArt said:

    Wings 3d  ....very basic program, simple logical interface

    Wings has been the easiest for me. Love using it...at least with 'rigid' models such as buildings, pottery, doors, windows, etc. Perhaps geometric models is a better term. 

    I used Amapi too. I think Wings is easier, but Amapi once you get used to it was pretty easy. Sad to hear it's no longer around. 

    I've never been able to get Hexagon to work, regardless of what computer I had. I sneeze, it crashes, I blink, it crashes, I breath, I move, basically I exist, and Hexagon crashes. I was hoping with a new computer there would be no issues, but they were only worse. Waste of money and time all those years of trying to get it to work right.

    Blender...I just stare at it. I refuse to ever allow it on another computer. I watched and read tutorials and still couldn't make sense of it. Seriously, I just don't get the hype. Perhaps it is meant for those who are already well versed in modelling and experienced at modelling. And perhaps for some of us, these things are way over our heads and we'll never understand it. I can't begin to think of the number of times I've tried Blender over the years. 

    ...the attraction to me with both Hexagon and Amapi over Wings or Silo is the first two also support full polygon modelling while the latter two are esentially "box" modellers (you have to start from a base primitive rather than building with individual polygons - there are advantages and disadvantages to both processess depending on what you want to model). 

    I've been able to get Hexagon to behave relatively well on my 64 bit system by setting it to large address aware (allows for an extra 1 GB of memory to be used) and changing some of the programme's preferences. The one downfall housever is smoothing.  I usually cannot go past level 3 without getting a warning that doing so could cause the programme to become unstable and crash.

    The only pro level programme I tried that I liked was Modo, but that was over eight years ago when it was still primarily a modelling programme. Now it too has gone "full featured" along with the associated price tag bloat (something like 1,600$)

    Post edited by kyoto kid on
  • IceDragonArtIceDragonArt Posts: 8,442

    I'm just learning to do basic modelling and I really like Carrara.  Far more intuitive for me than any other I've tried.And I am finally kind of getting the hang of modelling in Blender.  The trick with Blender is to ignor everything that you don't need and focus on just one thing, like modelling, at a time. But Carrara also has the forums here with lots of help and advice as well.

  • SickleYieldSickleYield Posts: 6,917

    I've heard the most positive things generally about Silo or Wings3d in terms of ease of use for the newcomer to 3d (I don't use either, but I don't have the option of choosing things on that basis).

  • NovicaNovica Posts: 16,464
    edited September 13

    Silo. I have Silo and Zbrush (the full program) and for getting used to piddlin' with it, the interface is very straightforward. I also bought a  Silo book, and bought Silo when it was on sale. Zbrush is awesome, and as many people have said throughout the years, you won't use MOST of the tools- there's so many, and so many combinations you can do! It's also very expensive. 

    I think it's smart to use these other things people are telling you, which are free. See if you'll even like it. I also have Lightwave (also very expensive) and don't use it. 

    Edit: I started a Silo thread, it's over in the Art Studio somewhere.

    Post edited by Novica on
  • ebergerlyebergerly Posts: 801
    edited September 13

    I'd suggest you try a few of the free ones first and see what you like. There's no right answer, everyone has different ideas of what is easy to learn. 

    That being said, anyone who says ZBrush is easy is, well, wrong. Very wrong. It's the worst UI ever designed. Very powerful tool, but impossible to understand. And for that you pay something like $800? 

    Blender is very powerful, and even has a video editor and compositor and a bunch of other stuff, and is very powerful, but for most people (including me, and I've been using it for years) it's difficult to learn. Not like it used to be before they re-designed the UI, but difficult. It's my go-to app, but I agree it's tough to learn and many times counter-intuitive. 

    I recall using Hexagon long ago, and yeah it was relatively easy and intuitive, but functionally it's VERY limited. I recall the UV mapping was a joke compared to what's out there now. And it's probably a dead app in terms of future development. So do you really want to spend time with something like that? 

    I recall Carrara has a modeller, and I only used it a little long ago, but didn't like it at all. VERY limited compared to something like Blender. 

    So there's no perfect answer. I know people always want a slam dunk answer, but software ain't that way. You should download some and try them. 

    Post edited by ebergerly on
  • FSMCDesignsFSMCDesigns Posts: 3,884

    Literally none of them. They all have a learning curve, you just have to try them out and see what works best for you.

    This!! I have used over 20 different modeling apps and they all had pros and cons for me. I found 3DSMax to be the one that clicked with me. it's usually about the user interface more than anything else, so you need to try them out to see which one works for you.

  • Carrara has the most comprehensible for me. Ymmv

  • kyoto kidkyoto kid Posts: 23,544
    edited September 13
    ...for myself it is Hexagon as I prefer the ability to build models or difficult to form segments up using individual polygons. Amapi was particularly good in this respect.
    Post edited by kyoto kid on
  • VaskaniaVaskania Posts: 5,879

    Quite frankly, the easist is the one you pick and stick with. I'm comfortable with Blender, but if I open Silo I feel lost. lol

  • kyoto kidkyoto kid Posts: 23,544
    edited September 14
    ...to me Silo is like getting behind the controls of a Cessna 172 on a lovely sunny afternoon while Blender makes me feel I'm on the flight deck of a 747 with two engines out that is in an inverted flat spin in the middle of a supercell thunderstorm.
    Post edited by kyoto kid on
  • VaskaniaVaskania Posts: 5,879

    To each their own. I ignore most of Blender's UI and use hotkeys and pie menus.

  • xyer0xyer0 Posts: 1,107

    Hubby got me ZBrush for my birthday so I was kind of forced to learn it. lol 

    @divamakeup, whatta man! You ought to keep him.

  • kyoto kidkyoto kid Posts: 23,544
    edited September 14
    Vaskania said:

    To each their own. I ignore most of Blender's UI and use hotkeys and pie menus.

    ...the keyboard based UI is what made me give up on Blender....several times. I originally was trained in traditional art mediums and thus a pointer driven UI feels much more natural than a cryptic hotkey one.
    Post edited by kyoto kid on
  • FauvistFauvist Posts: 692

    What I want to model is props and buildings - not human or amimal figures, or clothes. 

  • FauvistFauvist Posts: 692
    McGyver said:

    That depends on what you want to make and what your budget is.

    Just simple props for your own use... nothing too organic... SketchUp. My kids learned how to use it when they were 7 or 8... The big thing to remember with SU is keeping with quads (avoid Ngons) and watching that it doesn't flip the surface normals on you.

    For more complicated stuff... Hexagon if you want to wait until doomsday for a new version, or just bite the bullet and learn Blender... It's really not that hard if you don't already know how to model in other programs... If you do, just ignore what you already know.

    Silo is also pretty easy and it's often on sale for $20-$40.

     

    Sketchup doesn't offer the free version anymore - does it?  Or you can't save or export models or something?

  • FauvistFauvist Posts: 692

    I'm just learning to do basic modelling and I really like Carrara.  Far more intuitive for me than any other I've tried.And I am finally kind of getting the hang of modelling in Blender.  The trick with Blender is to ignor everything that you don't need and focus on just one thing, like modelling, at a time. But Carrara also has the forums here with lots of help and advice as well.

    I didn't realize Carrara had a modelling facet to it.  Maybe it'll be in this sale.  I'd could try that.

  • Be sure to experiment with soft selection; it's critical for getting decent smooth results

  • FauvistFauvist Posts: 692

    I got my feet wet with Sculptris - it's super easy to learn but you can't do a lot in the program. Maybe some simple morphs and 3D sculptures.

    Have they updated Sculptris from the initial release?  I couldn't get it to work for me.  I couldn't export anything that I was able to import into DAZ Strudio or Poser.

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