Stability

Does Hexagon run more stable is older os vs Windows 10? I can run xp in a vm or dual is. But why bother if it makes no difference?

Comments

  • cdordonicdordoni Posts: 468

    I have used Hex in Windows10, and it seemed to run about the same as in Windows7. I am using an old GeForce 440 which did not have any issue. Newer card drivers might cause some problems though. There are some settings that may not be compatible with Hexagon. There was a thread here many years ago on this subject but the last time I tried a search I could not locate it.

  • I'm far from being a techy so please take this with a pinch of salt. I've been using Hex for about 8 years now, and to be honest I cannot remember the last time it crashed on me, I think the reason is because over the years I have leant to avoid things which causes it a problem. And to save fairly often, especially before UV mapping.

    I'm using Windows 10 with a Nvidia GTX 960, apart from the extra memory patch (found in a post here, if I remember correctly it was suggested by Morkonan) my system is not tweaked at all. 

  • Well, I have to say, on my desktop with a GTX680, all is well.  But on my laptop which has a dual - Intel and Nvidia 525M, it wouldn't even run.  I had found a forum thread, which gave instruction to set the application in the Nvidia control panel, and that got it running.  However, it keeps crashing.  I've tweaked with the Ngidia control panel application settings since and nothing seems to stop the crashing.  Frustrating.

  • In the Nvidia Control Panel, I changed the Anistropic Filtering from application controlled to OFF.  This seems to help as I've not been working with it for 20 minutes and not a single crash.  MUCH better.  I'll post up if it continues.

  • Still crashing.  Doesn't seem to run well with dual graphics chips on my laptop.

  • edited June 25

    Hexagon 2.x crashes all the time on my Windows 10 Pro 64-bit. Hexagon 1.21 never crashes, so I use that for all my mesh modeling still for Poser and Vue projects.

    Post edited by shawndriscoll_34affb248a on
  • Roman_K2Roman_K2 Posts: 600
    Does Hexagon run more stable is older os vs Windows 10?

    It's not too bad on my relatively old laptop with Windows 7 with 4 Gb RAM... or at least it's a lot better than XP with 2 Gb was.  I have one thing though that I do that seems to bother a lot of programs - I use "Overdrive" (from a company in Ohio U.S.A.) to read books in my browser. Flaky program, or at least it does not seem to like Win 7! The reason I use it is because it what my local public library makes available; so what I'm saying is I try not to mix Hex with other some programs.

    I have noticed though that if I take a basic brick shape say, and I try to tesellate it, Hexagon instantly crashes. Sample screen shot here shows the "moment before" the crash. All I have to do is attempt a vertical tesellation from the selected edge say, and bye bye!!!

    I don't know enough to know if I am asking Hex to do the impossible, but it seems like a fairly innocuous operation, to want to tesellate on a 90-degree axis.

    point-of-no-return-in-win7.jpg
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  • Marcus SeverusMarcus Severus Posts: 632

    I tried this, following your screenshot, but had no crash - just a failure to work.  I see you have edges selected.

    I selected faces and then chose the Tesselate by Diamond tool and it worked perfectly on those faces.  I hadn't tried that tool before.  Often I use the Tesselate by Slice and would be lost without it.

    My findings haven't been checked against the manual!

  • Roman_K2Roman_K2 Posts: 600

    Ok, I have another question about that then. Been trying some of the other tesselation options... I made a large single-face primitive square and then started sub-dividing it... why do some of the tesselations come out in different patterns other than just four-quads-of-equal-size? Do you know what governs that? In my example here I like the one I "highlighted" -- it's like an asterisk.  Very curious!

    Ergo since Hexagon doesn't seem to "like" certain tesselating... er, methods or situations, are any of these patterns that come up "stronger" or "more rules-compliant" or anything like that?

    tesselation-pretty-cool-unusual-patterns-not-what-i-expected.jpg
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  • Marcus SeverusMarcus Severus Posts: 632

    Hi Roman, I'm afraid I don't know the reasons for the results you've shown.

    In general, I think most people get used to a subset of the tools and find they can make most things they want from them.  Tessalation such as you've shown would be unlikely to be done in model - although I know you're experimenting here.

    Your questions, though, led me to try a bit more with tesselation and that was beneficial.  Thanks!

  • AscaniaAscania Posts: 280
    Roman_K2 said:

    Ok, I have another question about that then. Been trying some of the other tesselation options... I made a large single-face primitive square and then started sub-dividing it... why do some of the tesselations come out in different patterns other than just four-quads-of-equal-size? Do you know what governs that? In my example here I like the one I "highlighted" -- it's like an asterisk.  Very curious!

    Ergo since Hexagon doesn't seem to "like" certain tesselating... er, methods or situations, are any of these patterns that come up "stronger" or "more rules-compliant" or anything like that?

    Look at the pre-existing edges. When tesselating Hexagon splits them at the centre. You tesselate one square and you get four nice squares out of it but now the adjacent square has two edges where previously was one and when tesselating that one both need to be split.

    Simples.

  • Roman_K2Roman_K2 Posts: 600

    Ok thanks. I guess I have trouble following this... basic geometry stuff.

  • AscaniaAscania Posts: 280
    Roman_K2 said:

    Ok thanks. I guess I have trouble following this... basic geometry stuff.

    Why? It is an exceedingly simple concept. The tesselate function will split any polygon, regardless of how many edges it has. The particular one we are concerned with does the splits from the centre of each edge to a joint cente point.

    When you tesselate a single quad on a multi-polygon surface then that has an effect on each and every polygon it has a joint edge with, turning those quads into pentagons. Thus when you now tesselate those polygins they are tesselated as pentagons.

    The computer does not deal with abstractions. It does not look at the monitor and sees what looks like a quad because two of its edges are in line with each other. The computer sees five edges and acts accordingly.

     

    Simples.

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