Ghost Lights: Interior lighting Tutorial

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Comments

  • frankrblowfrankrblow Posts: 2,052

    yes And good luck!

  • sapatsapat Posts: 1,735

    yes And good luck!

    laugh

  • This is very interesting. It's also somewhat interesting how one can easily grasp some aspects of 3D and totally have issues comprehending other aspects. So putting this into terms I might understand, do I understand correctly that after having purchased some rather detailed complex geometry, I'm supposed to port panels of drywall [those single planes of mesh] all over the place covering all that complex geometry ... and somehow this 'drywall' becomes "light" ...

  • SevrinSevrin Posts: 5,653

    This is very interesting. It's also somewhat interesting how one can easily grasp some aspects of 3D and totally have issues comprehending other aspects. So putting this into terms I might understand, do I understand correctly that after having purchased some rather detailed complex geometry, I'm supposed to port panels of drywall [those single planes of mesh] all over the place covering all that complex geometry ... and somehow this 'drywall' becomes "light" ...

    I usually add a primitive plane in the approximate size I want, reduce the cutout opacity if it's in the scene's viewport, set the emission colour to white (from black), and once you do that, you get options to increase the luminosity.   From there, you can scale and position and colour the plane so that it provides the lighting you want.

    You can make those changes to existing geometry and move that around, but if you do, you'll probably be adding more geometry than necessary.

  • Sevrin said:

    This is very interesting. It's also somewhat interesting how one can easily grasp some aspects of 3D and totally have issues comprehending other aspects. So putting this into terms I might understand, do I understand correctly that after having purchased some rather detailed complex geometry, I'm supposed to port panels of drywall [those single planes of mesh] all over the place covering all that complex geometry ... and somehow this 'drywall' becomes "light" ...

    I usually add a primitive plane in the approximate size I want, reduce the cutout opacity if it's in the scene's viewport, set the emission colour to white (from black), and once you do that, you get options to increase the luminosity.   From there, you can scale and position and colour the plane so that it provides the lighting you want.

    You can make those changes to existing geometry and move that around, but if you do, you'll probably be adding more geometry than necessary.

    Okay, thank you ... I'll be giving this all a try. Downloaded the .zip from sharecg.com too. I think some of us [me] just get overwhelmed by the number of dials and like, what in the world are they are for lol ...

     

  • SevrinSevrin Posts: 5,653
    Sevrin said:

    This is very interesting. It's also somewhat interesting how one can easily grasp some aspects of 3D and totally have issues comprehending other aspects. So putting this into terms I might understand, do I understand correctly that after having purchased some rather detailed complex geometry, I'm supposed to port panels of drywall [those single planes of mesh] all over the place covering all that complex geometry ... and somehow this 'drywall' becomes "light" ...

    I usually add a primitive plane in the approximate size I want, reduce the cutout opacity if it's in the scene's viewport, set the emission colour to white (from black), and once you do that, you get options to increase the luminosity.   From there, you can scale and position and colour the plane so that it provides the lighting you want.

    You can make those changes to existing geometry and move that around, but if you do, you'll probably be adding more geometry than necessary.

    Okay, thank you ... I'll be giving this all a try. Downloaded the .zip from sharecg.com too. I think some of us [me] just get overwhelmed by the number of dials and like, what in the world are they are for lol ...

     

    Here is a quick intro to homemade Ghost Lights

     

  • Sevrin said:
    Sevrin said:

    This is very interesting. It's also somewhat interesting how one can easily grasp some aspects of 3D and totally have issues comprehending other aspects. So putting this into terms I might understand, do I understand correctly that after having purchased some rather detailed complex geometry, I'm supposed to port panels of drywall [those single planes of mesh] all over the place covering all that complex geometry ... and somehow this 'drywall' becomes "light" ...

    I usually add a primitive plane in the approximate size I want, reduce the cutout opacity if it's in the scene's viewport, set the emission colour to white (from black), and once you do that, you get options to increase the luminosity.   From there, you can scale and position and colour the plane so that it provides the lighting you want.

    You can make those changes to existing geometry and move that around, but if you do, you'll probably be adding more geometry than necessary.

    Okay, thank you ... I'll be giving this all a try. Downloaded the .zip from sharecg.com too. I think some of us [me] just get overwhelmed by the number of dials and like, what in the world are they are for lol ...

     

    Here is a quick intro to homemade Ghost Lights

     

    Thank you very much that is indeed a well paced tutorial.

  • Catherine3678abCatherine3678ab Posts: 5,664
    edited October 2019

    Followed a tutorial, step by step ... I sure am missing something 'cause I noticed no difference.

    So far I'm pretty sure I've got these right:

    1st.png
    666 x 254 - 31K
    Post edited by Catherine3678ab on
  • TaozTaoz Posts: 9,177
    edited October 2019

    Followed a tutorial, step by step ... I sure am missing something 'cause I noticed no difference.

    So far I'm pretty sure I've got these right:

    3. apply the Emissive Iray shader (same folder as Uber Base)
    4. go to Surfaces tab, select plane, and change Emission Color to White
    5. set Cutout Opacity to 0.00001 if you want the light to be invisible. 
    6. turn on/off Two Sided Light as you prefer

    Change Emission Temperature (color) and Luminance / Luminance Units (light intensity) to adjust light.

     

    ghost_light.png
    1329 x 680 - 117K
    Post edited by Taoz on
  • Taoz said:

    Followed a tutorial, step by step ... I sure am missing something 'cause I noticed no difference.

    So far I'm pretty sure I've got these right:

    3. apply the Emissive Iray shader (same folder as Uber Base)
    4. go to Surfaces tab, select plane, and change Emission Color to White
    5. set Cutout Opacity to 0.00001 if you want the light to be invisible. 
    6. turn on/off Two Sided Light as you prefer

    Change Emission Temperature (color) and Luminance / Luminance Units (light intensity) to adjust light.

    Thank you!

    I also missed a rendering option, apparently it was supposed to "scene only" ... we'll get there!

     

     

  • TaozTaoz Posts: 9,177
    Taoz said:

    Followed a tutorial, step by step ... I sure am missing something 'cause I noticed no difference.

    So far I'm pretty sure I've got these right:

    3. apply the Emissive Iray shader (same folder as Uber Base)
    4. go to Surfaces tab, select plane, and change Emission Color to White
    5. set Cutout Opacity to 0.00001 if you want the light to be invisible. 
    6. turn on/off Two Sided Light as you prefer

    Change Emission Temperature (color) and Luminance / Luminance Units (light intensity) to adjust light.

    Thank you!

    I also missed a rendering option, apparently it was supposed to "scene only" ... we'll get there!

    Well if you only want to use ghost lights, but that's generally not considered optimal - they're mostly recommended as supplement lights only.  There is a discussion about them here, starting with this post:

    https://www.daz3d.com/forums/discussion/comment/3443536/#Comment_3443536

     

  • Taoz said:
    Taoz said:

    Followed a tutorial, step by step ... I sure am missing something 'cause I noticed no difference.

    So far I'm pretty sure I've got these right:

    3. apply the Emissive Iray shader (same folder as Uber Base)
    4. go to Surfaces tab, select plane, and change Emission Color to White
    5. set Cutout Opacity to 0.00001 if you want the light to be invisible. 
    6. turn on/off Two Sided Light as you prefer

    Change Emission Temperature (color) and Luminance / Luminance Units (light intensity) to adjust light.

    Thank you!

    I also missed a rendering option, apparently it was supposed to "scene only" ... we'll get there!

    Well if you only want to use ghost lights, but that's generally not considered optimal - they're mostly recommended as supplement lights only.  There is a discussion about them here, starting with this post:

    https://www.daz3d.com/forums/discussion/comment/3443536/#Comment_3443536

     

    Well not in the long run, I was following one tutorial that didn't mention anything about render settings, then another tutorial said if one didn't have scene only one would not likely notice much difference. I do realize that several settings will vary depending upon scenes, moods, effects, etc.

  • HavosHavos Posts: 4,872
    Taoz said:

    Followed a tutorial, step by step ... I sure am missing something 'cause I noticed no difference.

    So far I'm pretty sure I've got these right:

    3. apply the Emissive Iray shader (same folder as Uber Base)
    4. go to Surfaces tab, select plane, and change Emission Color to White
    5. set Cutout Opacity to 0.00001 if you want the light to be invisible. 
    6. turn on/off Two Sided Light as you prefer

    Change Emission Temperature (color) and Luminance / Luminance Units (light intensity) to adjust light.

    Thank you!

    I also missed a rendering option, apparently it was supposed to "scene only" ... we'll get there!

     

     

    It only has to be scene only if you do not want the light from any HDR or the sun/sky (these will often drown out any emissives). Emissive lights are the only thing that will shed light in every setting.

  • Catherine3678abCatherine3678ab Posts: 5,664
    edited October 2019

    Got it!  [n.b. turn off headlight!]

    Scene has 1 ghost light and 2 instances of it, not rendered through a camera which is of course a better way to render images but I got the lights!

    Thank you all ever so much :-)

    Got It!.jpg
    1000 x 1000 - 128K
    Post edited by Catherine3678ab on
  • Havos said:
    Taoz said:

    Followed a tutorial, step by step ... I sure am missing something 'cause I noticed no difference.

    So far I'm pretty sure I've got these right:

    3. apply the Emissive Iray shader (same folder as Uber Base)
    4. go to Surfaces tab, select plane, and change Emission Color to White
    5. set Cutout Opacity to 0.00001 if you want the light to be invisible. 
    6. turn on/off Two Sided Light as you prefer

    Change Emission Temperature (color) and Luminance / Luminance Units (light intensity) to adjust light.

    Thank you!

    I also missed a rendering option, apparently it was supposed to "scene only" ... we'll get there!

     

     

    It only has to be scene only if you do not want the light from any HDR or the sun/sky (these will often drown out any emissives). Emissive lights are the only thing that will shed light in every setting.

    I'll add that to my notes too :-)

  • fastbike1fastbike1 Posts: 4,068

    @Catherine3678ab "not rendered through a camera which is of course a better way to render images"

    Are you being sarcastic or serious? If you're serious, you still have a lot to learn about rendering.

  • fastbike1 said:

    @Catherine3678ab "not rendered through a camera which is of course a better way to render images"

    Are you being sarcastic or serious? If you're serious, you still have a lot to learn about rendering.

    Hmm ... actually I often render via Perspective View but had read that one is supposed to render via cameras, so let's go with the still have a lot to learn about rendering ;-)

  • frankrblowfrankrblow Posts: 2,052

    Perspective view is useful for moving around a scene, but offers the absolute minimum in control of, well, anything. Create a new camera and you can adjust it almost as well as a physical camera.

  • L'AdairL'Adair Posts: 9,476
    fastbike1 said:

    @Catherine3678ab "not rendered through a camera which is of course a better way to render images"

    Are you being sarcastic or serious? If you're serious, you still have a lot to learn about rendering.

    Well, I read it as a concession that rendering through a camera is the better way to render images.

     

    fastbike1 said:

    @Catherine3678ab "not rendered through a camera which is of course a better way to render images"

    Are you being sarcastic or serious? If you're serious, you still have a lot to learn about rendering.

    Hmm ... actually I often render via Perspective View but had read that one is supposed to render via cameras, so let's go with the still have a lot to learn about rendering ;-)

    @Catherine3678ab, The perspective view, (and the Top, Bottom, Left, Right, Front, and Back views as well,) are essentially cameras you have no real control over. They always start in the default positions when Daz Studio is first opened. And any changes you make to these views are outside of the Undo/Redo stack.

    Even while you are unsure of what the cameras can do, you can lock in the view you like by creating a New Camera and applying the Perspective View (in the Advanced Options.) Then if you move things around in Perspective View, you have still saved the Point of View you want to render with the camera. This feature alone makes it worth using cameras in your scene.

  • L'Adair said:
    fastbike1 said:

    @Catherine3678ab "not rendered through a camera which is of course a better way to render images"

    Are you being sarcastic or serious? If you're serious, you still have a lot to learn about rendering.

    Well, I read it as a concession that rendering through a camera is the better way to render images.

     

    fastbike1 said:

    @Catherine3678ab "not rendered through a camera which is of course a better way to render images"

    Are you being sarcastic or serious? If you're serious, you still have a lot to learn about rendering.

    Hmm ... actually I often render via Perspective View but had read that one is supposed to render via cameras, so let's go with the still have a lot to learn about rendering ;-)

    @Catherine3678ab, The perspective view, (and the Top, Bottom, Left, Right, Front, and Back views as well,) are essentially cameras you have no real control over. They always start in the default positions when Daz Studio is first opened. And any changes you make to these views are outside of the Undo/Redo stack.

    Even while you are unsure of what the cameras can do, you can lock in the view you like by creating a New Camera and applying the Perspective View (in the Advanced Options.) Then if you move things around in Perspective View, you have still saved the Point of View you want to render with the camera. This feature alone makes it worth using cameras in your scene.

    Absolutely and indeed I do.

  • fastbike1fastbike1 Posts: 4,068
    edited October 2019

    Apologies, my reply probably sounded pretty sarcastic itself. Rendering through a camera allows much more control since it works (more or less) like a real camera, particularly for shallow depth of field effects. You can also use multiple cameras to render different views of a single scene. You can also set dimensions for a given camera that override the dimensions set in render settings. Thus you can not only rendere different views of a given scene, but different perspectives as well.

    It is challenging because there are a lot of settings and choices for everything in a scene. Keep asking the questions, the forum is very helpful. 

    fastbike1 said:

    @Catherine3678ab "not rendered through a camera which is of course a better way to render images"

    Are you being sarcastic or serious? If you're serious, you still have a lot to learn about rendering.

    Hmm ... actually I often render via Perspective View but had read that one is supposed to render via cameras, so let's go with the still have a lot to learn about rendering ;-)

     

    Post edited by fastbike1 on
  • fastbike1 said:

    Apologies, my reply probably sounded pretty sarcastic itself. Rendering through a camera allows much more control since it works (more or less) like a real camera, particularly for shallow depth of field effects. You can also use multiple cameras to render different views of a single scene. You can also set dimensions for a given camera that override the dimensions set in render settings. Thus you can not only rendere different views of a given scene, but different perspectives as well.

    It is challenging because there are a lot of settings and choices for everything in a scene. Keep asking the questions, the forum is very helpful. 

    fastbike1 said:

    @Catherine3678ab "not rendered through a camera which is of course a better way to render images"

    Are you being sarcastic or serious? If you're serious, you still have a lot to learn about rendering.

    Hmm ... actually I often render via Perspective View but had read that one is supposed to render via cameras, so let's go with the still have a lot to learn about rendering ;-)

     

    Accepted. Yes for 'real scenes' [as opposed to most of my basic 'what does this look like' quick renders] matters such as depth of field/focal lengths etc. add to the overall quality of a render. The one situation though which basically must have Perspective view, is for rendering out texture templates.

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