Help! Someone gave me a kitten and I think one of us is in danger!

RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
edited December 1969 in The Commons

Ok, I'm not a pet person at all but I love animals from a far. So of course now I have a fish and a kitten living with me. Today my neighbor gave me a kitten and I don't know if I can live with it. Of course it's cute but I am not used to this little bundle of ... something. It follows me around constantly which I understand is because it's a baby and needy but it gets annoying when I almost trip over it. And it wants to climb up on me and those little claws scare the crap out of me. Oh and it peed on my bed!!! I am afraid to go to sleep for fear of what he/she'll do to me. Anyway I know there tons of cat owners here, so any advice?

I have all weekend to go out and get cat stuff for it and I will take it to the vet I guess Monday for shots. Or should I just be smart and give it back before I get too attached? It's curled up at my feet right now sleeping. Awww poor kitty.

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Comments

  • LedheadLedhead Posts: 1,586
    edited December 1969

    It needs a Litter Box and show the Kitten where the box is and you should have no problem with it peeing on your bed. If you are an animal lover, you will fall in love with the Kitten very fast. They are adorable and you just can't help it. They do have a tendency to climb up your legs when they are little, but they outgrow that rather quickly. In my opinion you should keep the kitten, they are a thrill to watch growing up and you never tire of them. Definitely keep an eye out for it when walking around. You don't want to hurt the little thing. I thought I would never like a cat. I was so wrong.

  • RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    They gave me some litter but I guess the kitten doesn't like it. It's awake now and I don't know what to do. It keeps clawing into my pants to climb me. How will I sleep??

  • GrandmaPaulaGrandmaPaula Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Since you are finding it too difficult to handle, you should give it back to the person who gave it to you. Or find it a good home. Good Luck

  • RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Yep, I think I will try giving it back. A kitten is a lot of work, more than a baby. I do want it to have a good home though. But I am too used to being alone now to have a kitten under foot. I always talked about adopting an adult cat so I guess my friends thought they were doing me a favor. But I think choosing a pet that suits your living situation is better. I love my betta fish though. :-)

  • JaguarEllaJaguarElla Posts: 10,658
    edited December 1969

    my Betta fish died
    my 3 cats are all 13+ years old

    I agree, kittens are annoying, lock it in the laundry or bathroom at night with it's litter tay, food, water and wear earplugs!
    a wind up clock wrapped in a cloth in it"s bed will imitate mother's heartbeat.
    Two kittens are actually easier than one, they play with each other instead of clawing you.

  • LedheadLedhead Posts: 1,586
    edited December 1969

    I completely disagree about kittens being annoying and they are certainly in no way more difficult to handle than a baby. It just may not be for you.

  • JaguarEllaJaguarElla Posts: 10,658
    edited December 1969

    I am very fond of cats, my 3 all sleep on my bed and me in a chair but kittens are over the top, fortunately they soon grow up.
    if you have two, they are fun to watch play and you need not feel guilty about locking them away at night or when you are not home.
    just give them lots of toys, ie paper bags, pingpong balls etc.

  • RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Well I don't know about not being more difficult than babies, maybe more involved than babies. Babies don't climb on everything, don't have claws, don't climb on your head, and they wear diapers. At this point in my life I don't want a baby either.

    The kitty is awake again and meowing. I don't want to lock it in a room, that seems mean, but dang it I'm not used to things jumping on me. I have this stuff called boundary (that I bought to keep away the neighbors cat years ago) it stinks and he gave the bed a wide berth for a while, but still he wants to jump on the bed when I'm not looking.

    How often do they sleep. I think he/she is a few weeks old. I think he still needs a mama.

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 19,861
    edited October 2012

    He should not have been given to you if he is less than 6 weeks old. Hopefully he is at least that old.

    At that age they need food little and often, and better to have the proper kitten food, as it is easier for the tiny ones to eat. Also needs milk and water available for him at all times. (preferably the milk that you buy in the petfood store, that is formulated for cats, as they do say cows milk is not good for cats, although I have never known a cat that took any harm from it.

    He is going to be a bit clingy at first, as he is missing his siblings as well as his Mum, the first few days are always the worst bit about settling any new little animal down.

    My latest two came from a recue place, and because one of them hadn't been well the lady from the rescue had them indoors until they were homed with us, and she said they were locked in the bathroom at night, and came to no harm from it. In fact now they are with us they do still want to go into the bathroom to play. :coolsmirk:

    As to sleeping, kittens and cats do sleep a lot. Kittens have a habit of falling asleep mid play, which can be quite funny.

    Post edited by Chohole on
  • TraceSLTraceSL Posts: 25
    edited October 2012

    The kitten climbs you because it needs re-assurance, just hold it. Potty trainning, start feeding on a schedule and 90 minutes to 2 hours start placing the kitten in the litter, it will get the message! Don't feed before bed, also, you can lock in a bathroom with the litter at night but once it knows where it is to go, it will go. Play with it, get a feather on a stick; this bonds you and the cat but it also wears it out so it will sleep. Other note, keep food and litter away from each other...not in same room.

    Post edited by TraceSL on
  • larsmidnattlarsmidnatt Posts: 3,400
    edited December 1969

    Young animals are a lot of work and that is why I only adopt resuce animals (dogs really) after they are one year old. They tend to have at least some potty training by then and are past a lot of their puppy/kitten issues.

    To each his own of course, I'm single and have no one to help me with my pets so I can't be available every 90 minutes to take care of them.

  • adamr001adamr001 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Also make sure the litter box is appropriately sized. If it's difficult for the little kitten to get into and out of you're more likely to have a difficult time training them. Just put him in the box and take one of his little paws and gently, GENTLY, make little digging motions (up, forward, down to litter, back towards body) and he'll get the idea real quick.

  • bighbigh Posts: 5,524
    edited December 1969

    if its got long hair - take it back - you will not like the hair balls that they throw up from what you have posted
    and you will have to comb or brush it

  • zigraphixzigraphix Posts: 2,768
    edited December 1969

    Kittens generally figure out litter boxes very quickly-- cats naturally prefer to bury their waste. You can try the wind-up clock in a towel, and there are also small heating pads made for cats that help comfort them, but kittens tend to be very social and yours will want to sit with (on) you when possible.

    As odd as it sounds, two kittens are less work than one. If you want to keep the kitten but can't handle having to keep it amused all the time, get a second kitten of about the same age and gender. The two of them will amuse one another (and you), and will be able to keep each other company. They won't be kittens forever... but even adult cats often get lonely if they're solo.

  • RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    This poor kitty. I did the put him in closed room thing, but my apartment is open so I heard him crying the whole time. I did get a little sleep though. Soon as I let him loose he was all over my feet and legs rubbing against them. I felt so bad but I needed some rest. Plus I'm supposed to go out tonight which I don't think I can do and leave him here alone. I still don't think he likes the litter they gave me or maybe the dish I've put it in.

    Since I'm supposed to be working as a phone rep from home I really can't have a kitten in the background crying. It really is bad timing to have a kitten. :-(

    I feel so bad, this is some "gift".

  • icprncssicprncss Posts: 3,481
    edited December 1969

    Best suggestion: give the cat back to the people who gave it to you or, if they will not take it back, locate a reputable no-kill rescue organization.

    How old is the kitten? Some of the issues you're bringing up sound like the kitten was separated from the mother too soon.

  • larsmidnattlarsmidnatt Posts: 3,400
    edited December 1969

    Pets make horrible gifts, they are closer to babies than computers. They are living creatures that need care. And from the sounds of it you are a caring person who wants the best for the kitty. If it really isn't good timing and your heart is not in it, I would suggest doing as icprncss pointed out. There is nothing wrong with that.

    If at a later time you find the time and interest to get a pet you can take time researching what is best for your lifestyle. I wish you and the kitty the best, just don't feel bad if you discover the cat isn't for you. No reason to feel guilty.

  • JaderailJaderail Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    You should not feel bad, some people are not cat people and most cat people forget what a handful a kitten can be. Some people really need to start with older animals period, puppies can be just as big a handful. Your friend gifted it to you not thinking about the fact they understand the kittens needs and you would be new to the experience. I would give the kitten back and explain why, if you still want a companion animal I suggest your local animal shelter. You could pick out a animal that is past this stage of life but would still bond with you and turn into a great friend.

  • RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    I really feel he is just a baby. This kitten is so adorable and if he weren't so young I would be totally on board. But this is why people should have their pets fixed. Because they don't know what to do when they have babies and just start giving them away. At least at the shelters they vet you and try to fit the pet to the person.

    I can already see his little cat mind working on a solution to the boundary spray dilemma he has too. :lol:

  • larsmidnattlarsmidnatt Posts: 3,400
    edited December 1969

    And don't feel bad about keeping it isolated sometimes for it's safety and your sanity. It's part of taking care of pets. You are responsible for it and yourself and sometimes you make tough decisions. Obviously you don't want to keep them locked up, but for safetly you needed to.

    My dogs are 6 and 7 years old and I still keep them in the doggy area when I leave the house. And when I'm home they have to be in the same room as me most of the time. Otherwise they eat the trash, battle with each other and stuff like that.

    And yes I totally believe people should fix their pets. I had a friend that refused to because "he felt bad" about doing it. How come? If they aren't fixed they still have desires that aren't being met and thats why doggie used your pillow for fun time. But whatever, some people don't get it.

  • Kendall SearsKendall Sears Posts: 1,886
    edited December 1969

    Animals should never be "given." The bond between an animal and its caretaker should be made from the beginning. Animals have "personalities" just as people do, and some types just clash. If they are willing, ask the givers to take the kitten back. Especially if they have the parents and/or siblings. It sounds as if this kitten is not old enough to be separated from its mother. There are certain behaviours that the young cats will pick up from their parents very quickly, and your kitten hasn't learned them yet.

    If you cannot get the kitten back into the care of a qualified caretaker, you need to get kitten formula from a pet care center immediately. If this poor thing is too young, it may still need the extra nutrition.

    Secondarily, you sound really fond of your fish. Once the kitten gets a little more confident, the fish is in danger.

    Also, young animals and home offices don't work well together. Puppies are especially loud when they want/need attention. Both pups and kittens love to shred paper and forms *will* fall victim.

    Kendall

  • larsmidnattlarsmidnatt Posts: 3,400
    edited December 1969

    Oh and speaking of home offices particularly for dogs if you have a paper shredder keep it unplugged when not in use. not just off but unplugged.

    its very rare but dogs have put their tongue in the shredder before and lost enough of their tongue that they could no longer eat. Which then means of course they got put down.

    Not trying to be a downer, but its a good practice anyway, just keep that shredder unplugged.

  • ElowanElowan Posts: 387
    edited December 1969

    The litter box needs to have low sides to allow the kitten to get in and out without difficulty.

    I placed my kitten on my shoulder when i was working at my laptop or watching TV. She was able to hear and feel my pulse and heart beat and relaxed totally.

  • RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    OMG I hear him digging in the litter :-) I hope this is a turning point because the peeing in the bed is a deal breaker. I think the people who gave him to me didn't train it because he wouldn't even go near the litter last night no matter what.

    I think I would luv an adult cat who is more independent but a kitten is needy and I'm a first time cat owner. The true test is my niece who stays with me a lot. If she can tolerate him then he has a good chance. We've talked about getting a cat or dog for a long time, but reality is a lot different than fantasy. This kitten is adorable as all kittens are, it's in it's little hiding place, the entrance to a box I set up for it.

  • anikadanikad Posts: 1,860
    edited December 1969

    You should get yourself a book on kitten care if you're planning on keeping him.

  • zigraphixzigraphix Posts: 2,768
    edited December 1969

    I would be right in line with the folks telling you to give him back and get an older cat when you're ready, but it sounds like you've already attached to him... better find out how old he really is, and see if he still needs kitten formula, as others have suggested. Evaporated milk (unsweetened) can be used if you can't find kitten formula. Don't use regular cow's milk from the store-- your litter box will get very stinky that way!

    People don't housebreak kittens. Their moms usually do it, or they figure it out on their own.

    Is he eating solid food?

    Be aware that there's no turning back once you've given him a name... it's much harder to give them up once you do that.

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 19,861
    edited December 1969

    The sort of Kitty litter you use may make a difference to him as well. My 2 don't like the sort of clay pellet stuff, are much happier with the wood chip one, which breaks down into saw dust as they scrape around.

    We find it is more economical as well, last longer than the clay type ones, and much more environementally friendly

    http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&keywords=pine pellets&page=1&rh=i:aps,k:pine pellets

  • ElowanElowan Posts: 387
    edited December 1969

    Male cats have a tendency to mark their territory even after being 'fixed' so ...

  • Kendall SearsKendall Sears Posts: 1,886
    edited December 1969

    Elowan said:
    Male cats have a tendency to mark their territory even after being 'fixed' so ...

    Oh YES! And that smell NEVER goes away!!!

    Kendall

  • ValandarValandar Posts: 662
    edited December 1969

    Elowan said:
    Male cats have a tendency to mark their territory even after being 'fixed' so ...

    To an extent, that depends on what age the cat was fixed. Both of my male kittens (7 months old) have yet to mark anything in that way, they just rub their faces on things.

    I now suggest to Romancefantasy that what anikad said is totally right, but don't stop there. Ask friends who own cats for advice, and look online for things like reading cat body language, what kinds of food to start feeding him when he grows older, and so on. Six years ago, a friend gave me my first cat, Shinju, who is currently asleep on her bed right beside my computer table. I knew nothing about how to take care of a cat, so I went straight to the sources I just mentioned. She's now a happy, calm kitty, who snuggles with me when I sleep, and always has to be in the same room as me. The vet listed her health as "perfect", she has a soft, shiny coat, and though she finds the kittens annoying, still seems to want to take care of them.

    Being a first time cat owner can be scary - but if you do your research and ask for advice, it can be very rewarding, both for you and for the little fuzzball.

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