Show Us Your Bryce Renders! Part 2

Rashad CarterRashad Carter Posts: 1,039
edited December 2012 in Bryce Discussion

What's that? We produced a hundred pages of amazing work and now its time to produce a hundred more.

Long Live Bryce

Long Live Daz3D

Long Live Chohole

need I say more?

To reference the works in the previous thread follow this link:

http://www.daz3d.com/forums/discussion/658/

Post edited by Chohole on
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Comments

  • David BrinnenDavid Brinnen Posts: 2,851
    edited October 2012

    Like a beggar seeding the pot, I will throw in this one I made the other day for the "underwater city" thread, which seems to have been abandoned by the OP. I am most pleased that I finally found a way to use the "light sensitive" material option. The harder the lights shine, the higher the density of the material - for added murk.

    * * *

    The Kraken, by Alfred Tennyson

    Below the thunders of the upper deep;
    Far far beneath in the abysmal sea,
    His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleep
    The Kraken sleepeth: faintest sunlights flee
    About his shadowy sides; above him swell
    Huge sponges of millennial growth and height;
    And far away into the sickly light,
    From many a wondrous grot and secret cell
    Unnumber’d and enormous polypi
    Winnow with giant arms the slumbering green.
    There hath he lain for ages, and will lie
    Battening upon huge seaworms in his sleep,
    Until the latter fire shall heat the deep;
    Then once by man and angels to be seen,
    In roaring he shall rise and on the surface die.

    * * *

    Starring Great Cthulhu as the eponymous Kraken. Underwatery effects achieved using this process Bryce 25 minute lighting project - advanced underwater effects - a tutorial by David Brinnen

    Rendered in 5 and a half hours. Saved as HDR. Tonemapped. A score of black fireflies removed and gamma corrected in PSP8.

    UnTA_Cthulhu_rising1_tm.jpg
    850 x 850 - 281K
    Post edited by David Brinnen on
  • KerynaKeryna Posts: 96
    edited December 1969

    Long live Carter, Brinnan and Horo too!

    Thanks David for posting the amazing water scene and poem. Very dramatic and the light splitting though the water looks amazing.

    My post is a lonely ammonite under a Brinnan layered sky. The shell is my own model done in Hexagon , but it just looks great under this amazing sky!

    AmmoniteBluesky1.jpg
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  • HoroHoro Posts: 4,343
    edited December 1969

    Ah the 100 page limit hit us mercilessly. Luckily, there is always http://www.bryce5.com which doesn't forget our renders and comments.

    @David - nice poem. Underwater scene may not be completely realistic but it turned out as a great artwork where the artist took some liberties to emphasize the magic of Cthulhu.

  • HoroHoro Posts: 4,343
    edited December 1969

    @keryna - the shell came out very well. I like how sky, water and shell fit together. Just the opening of the shell could do with a tiny bit of light.

  • SylverdaliSylverdali Posts: 198
    edited October 2012

    keryna said:
    Long live Carter, Brinnan and Horo too!

    Thanks David for posting the amazing water scene and poem. Very dramatic and the light splitting though the water looks amazing.

    My post is a lonely ammonite under a Brinnan layered sky. The shell is my own model done in Hexagon , but it just looks great under this amazing sky!

    @keryna, the blue shell ,very beautiful work great reflections and color mats

    Post edited by Sylverdali on
  • OdaaOdaa Posts: 249
    edited December 1969

    @keryna and David both amazing works :)

  • Dave SavageDave Savage Posts: 1,942
    edited October 2012

    I'll fire my first salvo into this new thread then (see what I did there?).

    Change of subject matter here.

    Title: Beauty and the Beasts.

    Egypt-Tanks2.jpg
    800 x 800 - 190K
    Post edited by Dave Savage on
  • GussNemoGussNemo Posts: 1,855
    edited December 1969

    Second verse better than the first?

    @David: Your last image in the last render thread looks like something see on monitors in Sci-Fi movies. Looks neat. Your latest underwater looks great. The light prism affect on the toppled statue is a nice touch.

    @keryna: That's a very nice shell. Sky and water do it justice.

    @Dave: That's an interesting image. I only wonder about the light on the near tank.

  • Dave SavageDave Savage Posts: 1,942
    edited December 1969

    GussNemo said:
    @Dave: That's an interesting image. I only wonder about the light on the near tank.

    It's either the golden reflection from Tutankhamun's mask... Or it's just a highlight introduced to give some detail in an otherwise murky part of the render. :cheese:

  • GussNemoGussNemo Posts: 1,855
    edited December 1969

    @Dave: Most probably Tutankhamun admiring your handy work. :lol:

  • SylverdaliSylverdali Posts: 198
    edited December 1969

    I'll fire my first salvo into this new thread then (see what I did there?).

    Change of subject matter here.

    Title: Beauty and the Beasts.

    @ TheSavage64 the pyramids look fab against the haze and the color is stunning, The tanks create a disturbing slant to the image that reminds me of war and peace

  • HoroHoro Posts: 4,343
    edited December 1969

    I'll fire my first salvo into this new thread then (see what I did there?).

    Change of subject matter here.

    Title: Beauty and the Beasts.


    Great render. I don't particularly like the subject matter because of what it implies, but the render is excellent.

  • SylverdaliSylverdali Posts: 198
    edited October 2012

    something a little different i have been experimenting with mats

    zoeina_xorine_Sun_Goddess.jpg
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    Post edited by Sylverdali on
  • Dave SavageDave Savage Posts: 1,942
    edited December 1969

    Horo said:
    Great render. I don't particularly like the subject matter because of what it implies, but the render is excellent.

    Thanks Horo. I'm glad you like the render.
    Maybe the subject matter isn't implying what you think it is, though I usually like to leave interpretation up to the viewer.

    When I was setting it up I had in mind last year's events in Egypt where due to the Arab Spring revolutions the treasures of Egypt were pillaged by people taking advantage of the country not having any Government or law authorities.

    I thought of this as the guarding of treasure. :)

  • Dave SavageDave Savage Posts: 1,942
    edited December 1969

    @ TheSavage64 the pyramids look fab against the haze and the color is stunning, The tanks create a disturbing slant to the image that reminds me of war and peace

    Thanks :)

    Though I'm not exactly sure of what make and model the tanks are, I'm quite sure they aren't contemporary to either of the world wars.
    In their original livery (which I substituted for rust) they were UN badged... but like I just said to Horo, the viewer's interpretation is more important than the artists intent. :)

  • Dave SavageDave Savage Posts: 1,942
    edited December 1969

    something a little different i have been experimenting with mats

    This gives great and crisp reflections... very nice.

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 19,840
    edited December 1969

    something a little different i have been experimenting with mats


    That is quite fascinatiing

  • canyonmanterrycanyonmanterry Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    @ silverdali. To me it,s a big WOW!!! I love it great job .

  • David BrinnenDavid Brinnen Posts: 2,851
    edited December 1969

    Well since Dave got me thinking about the role of haze I've been tinkering around with that. The first image, I wanted the focus on the terrains hence leaving the sky empty. TA render, 10 minutes, standard Bryce sun is the primary lights source. Soft shadows 15. Island material used for the terrain. I wasn't keen on the water. So had another go... Again 10 minute TA render. Almost the same setup. However, I used the spherical mapper to capture the Big Sur sky from the free could scene provided with 7.0 and changed the water. And threw in one of the fine Stanford scanning repository models to act as some kind of focus.

    Keryna, thank you, subtle and simple render. It is the sparse scenes I like the best. The less complex they are the more attention that can be lavished on everything else. The iridescent shell material complements the sky very well.

    Dave, the tank scene looks amiss. I think maybe because we are looking right into the sun and yet it is not very bright. The fading of the pyramids into golden haze is nice. The range of contrasts is good. The echo of the three tanks with the three pyramids is fine. I think if the sun really looked like it was burning into the camera, maybe with some lens flare... maybe not. I'm never sure about lens flare.

    Silverdali, beautiful crisp render, I could easily imagine this as a frame in an animation.

    Ps3.jpg
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    Ps2.jpg
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  • Dave SavageDave Savage Posts: 1,942
    edited December 1969

    That haze with the pyramids thing... That's me learning about colour prespective, the nifty other thing to play with, thanks.

    The Lens Flare... OK, I can do that easily enough.
    :-)

    Egypt-Tanks2b.jpg
    800 x 800 - 174K
  • GussNemoGussNemo Posts: 1,855
    edited December 1969

    @Silver: That's a very beautiful render. How did you create it?

  • HoroHoro Posts: 4,343
    edited December 1969

    something a little different i have been experimenting with mats

    Reflections can give so nice effects. Excellent composition.


    @David - landscape looks very nice. There is still that faint haze line where the Bryce horizon is.



    The Lens Flare... OK, I can do that easily enough.
    :-)

    For me, definitive an improvement towards the bad. I prefer the first shot because if the atmosphere contains a lot of sand, the sun is dimmed. Sahara sand in the high atmosphere sometimes comes north to central Europe and dims the sun and tints the landscape into a yellowish-red colour. And those Photosop lens flares just don't look natural. I have yet to see a lens that gives such perfectly round lens flares.

  • David BrinnenDavid Brinnen Posts: 2,851
    edited December 1969

    Dave, lens flare... no, no. NO! What were you thinking? What was I thinking? Clearly I was wrong.

    Horo, that band of haze is above the horizon in this case, that is the top of the haze, I wanted to give the effect of the haze being settled and the tops of the hills poking out of the top. Obviously this didn't quite work.

  • Dave SavageDave Savage Posts: 1,942
    edited December 1969

    I know the lens flare doesn't work, that's why I used the grinning yellow bloke and only took 30 seconds to do it. :-)

    Although I must say the actual sun part does look slightly more convincing to me bleached out and blurred, the lens flare rings are a distraction that like Horo says, don't look much like real lens flare at all.

  • Peter FulfordPeter Fulford Posts: 277
    edited December 1969


    Though I'm not exactly sure of what make and model the tanks are, I'm quite sure they aren't contemporary to either of the world wars.


    anorak alert

    The tanks are actually Armoured Personnel Carriers - more specifically "Infantry Fighting Vehicles". More specifically still, they are (low res) British "Warriors".
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Warrior_Infantry_Fighting_Vehicle.jpg
    These are current equipment.

    If you were to render a version of the Egyptian army (rather than the British) defending the ancient relics against Salafist attentions, you could use one of these:
    http://www.daz3d.com/shop/m2a2-bradley-ods
    which isn't a bad model (shown below in non-Egyptian colours). The Egyptians mostly use the older M113 tracked IFV fitted with the Bradley turret, as well as lots of wheeled APCs.


    Having said all that twaddle, I think the vague armoured vehicles suit the arty image nicely and convey your intention well (which I got, btw - the weapons are pointed outwards).


    Slightly updated Bryce7 version of old Bryce5 TA test.

    Bradley8.jpg
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  • JamahoneyJamahoney Posts: 881
    edited December 1969

    First attempt of an interior.

    Lighting: nine conical lights and one spherical. Tried volumetric lighting as per Dan’s fog cube setup, however, too many light rays ‘wash-out’ the scene (experimenting, therefore, a recommendation). Main light is behind the camera, and is affecting shadow intensity in areas like, for example, the cushion on the ground, leading edge of carpet, chair etc.,...and other areas (click image for larger view on these). Again, more experiementation required, however, for now, this is a finished work.

    Artwork title: “Posh Pad”

    Jay

    PoshPad.jpg
    1748 x 873 - 659K
  • Dave SavageDave Savage Posts: 1,942
    edited December 1969

    Looks good to me Jay.... I especially like the very natural looking contrast of the hard and soft shadows where the shadow from the chair and the window frame merge against the right wall.

    You mention how you lit it but surely there's also Bryce sun involved?
    If you're trying to achieve the same effect that Dan got with light beams shining in through the window (from the sun), maybe give it another go but turn the intensity of the sun right down? Yes the lights bouncing off the volumetric haze could have the effect of bleaching out, but I think a balance between sunlight intensity and haze amount could get past that problem.

    Every time I've tried the volumetric world, it brings Bryce to a standstill. When the feature was first introduced in Bryce I did a simple render (typical palm tree island lit from behind) using volumetric world and for such a simple scene it took 14 hours to render.... I'll see if I can find it later, the resulting effect was subtle to say the least. :)

  • Dave SavageDave Savage Posts: 1,942
    edited October 2012

    @PJF; Thanks for all that info.
    Yes the tank (or APV as it turns out :cheese:) is a very low res freebie, from this website, which is an invaluable resource for thousands of little bits and pieces to import into Bryce and play with.

    Post edited by Dave Savage on
  • Dave SavageDave Savage Posts: 1,942
    edited December 1969

    Well since Dave got me thinking about the role of haze I've been tinkering around with that. The first image, I wanted the focus on the terrains hence leaving the sky empty. TA render, 10 minutes, standard Bryce sun is the primary lights source. Soft shadows 15. Island material used for the terrain. I wasn't keen on the water. So had another go... Again 10 minute TA render. Almost the same setup. However, I used the spherical mapper to capture the Big Sur sky from the free could scene provided with 7.0 and changed the water. And threw in one of the fine Stanford scanning repository models to act as some kind of focus.

    Coming back to this David...

    Personally I think the first one is better, though the reflection of the clouds certainly lifts the water in the second one.
    Can I ask, what sort of scale do you usually use when setting up a scene, say in relation to the default ground plane square.
    Sometimes I end up making my terrain massive in relation to that in order to get a good atmosphere going on and other times not.

    One really good thing about Carrara (I flirted with it last year) is when you set up a new document you get to choose what scale you're going to be working at and your choice there determines what units of measurement you use and sets things in scale. But when working in Bryce I don't really ever consider scale on the various elements as I make them, meaning that I regularly encounter problems of placing an object from my library into a scene to find it's for instance, a giant washing machine. I know it's not much trouble to then just re-size it but I've often wondered if others use a consistent scale for their work.

  • HoroHoro Posts: 4,343
    edited December 1969

    One really good thing about Carrara (I flirted with it last year) is when you set up a new document you get to choose what scale you're going to be working at and your choice there determines what units of measurement you use and sets things in scale. But when working in Bryce I don't really ever consider scale on the various elements as I make them, meaning that I regularly encounter problems of placing an object from my library into a scene to find it's for instance, a giant washing machine. I know it's not much trouble to then just re-size it but I've often wondered if others use a consistent scale for their work.

    Size matters, particularly for outdoors when haze is used. I seldom start with a terrain smaller than 1000 BU. Often, I set 1 BU=1km and then I have a scale. Bryce doesn't have that feature of scaling as Carrara does, but you can still scale it by assigning a particular unit to a BU. If you set 1 BU = 1 m, you can go directly down to 1 mm. There is a bit of calculation involved if you prefer miles, feet, inches.

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