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Posted: 08 September 2012 11:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Anyone else feeling old now like I am?... lmao

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Schell’s Armour Works… Home of “Theschell’s” Fantasy, Sci-fi and Historical models for Daz and Poser. Come check out my Website and Store at http://www.schells.ca ... Hope to see you soon!
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“The only good place for a troll is under the bridge where he belongs!”

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Posted: 09 September 2012 02:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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namffuak - 08 September 2012 09:08 PM

OK - OF here.

My first ‘puter was an IBM 7094 Mod II at Purdue ...

Professionally, much the same thing - IBM to Burroughs to Honeywell to IBM and then IBM - 360-DOS to MCP-V to GCOS-3 to MVS ...

with side trips trough Raytheon PTS-1200 key-to-disk and Honeywell DPS-6 running GCOS-6 (almost exactly 100% not quite UNIX); dial-up lines to leased lines to statistical multiplexers and X.25 packet-switching, SNA, and finally TCP/IP on high-speed leased lines.

And now that I’ve retired I look back at all that and wonder - just what was so bad about pointed sticks and clay slabs? grin

Yep, I may not have worked on all those but I remember those names and was around them, some still at the Kennedy Space Center during the mid-70s.

You said “Raytheon”, not many people even know that Raytheon was in the computer game for a while.  I managed the “Special Measurements Division” computers on the 2nd floor of the Launch Control Center at KSC from 1974 to 1979.  We had two Raytheons.  a Raytheon-706 with 8K core memory and an RDS-500 with 16K.  We did the special (non launch critical) stuff.  Monitoring electrical field strength around the whole space center.  Experimenting with lightning detection and ranging (LDAR).  Measuring rainfall density to determine it’s effect on future Shuttle landing strip automated radar system.  Measuring stresses on the Shuttle’s Tail Service Mast flame bonnet as it slammed shut seconds before the rocket rose.  I was a young boy with a million dollars of grown up toys!  (*cool*)

I had to write my own floating point arithmetic algorithms.  I had to write my own device drivers for hard drives & graphic printers & displays.  I had to write my own graphics display algorithms from scratch even for straight lines from point A to point B.  No software came pre-packaged except the assembler and FORTRAN compiler.  And forget networking.  In order to get my two machines to talk to each other I had to read the schematics and solder wires onto the backplane of each machine and then I had to invent the data transmission protocol too.  All this in 8K and 16K memory machines that were each doing real-time multi-tasking too.  It was like cramming 5 pounds of Crisco into a 3 pound can. 8-o

This was back when there were few standards.  Engineers of our era were the ones who created the implementations on which the first standards were based.

And of course I had to walk up hill both ways going to and from school.

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I’m sooo confused…  I’ve come to grasp a little of the nature of reality and the answer to life, the universe, and everything.  I even have an inkling as to who and what I am. Auuummmmm…  But please, please, who the hell are you?  And why are you trampling my roses?

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Posted: 09 September 2012 03:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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Ah, the smell of hot wax in the morning… Not to mention stalking the halls with scraps of zipatone stuck on my elbows. And spray mount? I do not miss spray mount or rubber cement (or the Bestine used to thin it) At All.

The Department wouldn’t let us get a computer until 1990. “You’re the Graphics Section. What would *you* do with a computer?”

As it turned out; typesetting, because there was only one computer for 14 of us, and even at that it was a great improvement.

It was a Mac. We were the Graphics Section. In fact, it was a MacIIci, which was fairly high end at the time. We used it for years until it finally just couldn’t handle the work we were needing to produce. Took us a decade before we had enough computers to go around. (And by then there were only 6 of us, and produced as much work as the whole crew had the decade earlier.)

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Posted: 09 September 2012 04:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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10 INPUT “What is your name: “, U$
20 PRINT “Hello “; U$
30 INPUT “How many cookies do you want: “, N
40 S$ = “”
50 FOR I = 1 TO N
60 S$ = S$ + “Yummy Cookies 8() “
70 NEXT I
80 PRINT S$
90 INPUT “Do you want more cookies? “, A$
100 IF LEN(A$) = 0 THEN GOTO 90
110 A$ = LEFT$(A$, 1)
120 IF A$ = “Y” OR A$ = “y” THEN GOTO 30
130 PRINT “Goodbye “; U$
140 END

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Posted: 09 September 2012 05:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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When “Cut-n-paste” meant scissors cutting sections of paper tape, and paste meant using paste to adhere the sections together so that the reader wouldn’t jam.

Subroutines were categorized on a cork board.  Real “object oriented” programming.  Go to the board, pull the tack, select your “object” (paper tape strip), put the rest back on the board (or make copies if only 1 was left).  Programming done in Forth.

4096 bytes was the allowed quota for exe size, and CPU time was charged by the CPU second.

Kendall

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Any opinions expressed in this post are those of Kendall Sears and may, or may not, be more, or less, valid than any other opinion.

The contents of this post are intended for the DAZ forum only, do not re-post any portion to any other forum without his permission.

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Posted: 09 September 2012 05:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Ippotamus - 09 September 2012 04:19 PM

10 INPUT “What is your name: “, U$
20 PRINT “Hello “; U$
30 INPUT “How many cookies do you want: “, N
40 S$ = “”
50 FOR I = 1 TO N
60 S$ = S$ + “Yummy Cookies 8() “
70 NEXT I
80 PRINT S$
90 INPUT “Do you want more cookies? “, A$
100 IF LEN(A$) = 0 THEN GOTO 90
110 A$ = LEFT$(A$, 1)
120 IF A$ = “Y” OR A$ = “y” THEN GOTO 30
130 PRINT “Goodbye “; U$
140 END

Come on now…. real BASIC required PEEK and POKE to do anything useful.  grin  Also, there’s not near enough GOTOs in that example.  (Paraphrase from SNL) If it ain’t Italian, it’s CRAAAAAPPPP!

Kendall

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Any opinions expressed in this post are those of Kendall Sears and may, or may not, be more, or less, valid than any other opinion.

The contents of this post are intended for the DAZ forum only, do not re-post any portion to any other forum without his permission.

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Posted: 09 September 2012 06:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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chrisschell - 08 September 2012 11:43 PM

Anyone else feeling old now like I am?... lmao

No, actually, I’m feeling terribly young. raspberry

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Posted: 09 September 2012 06:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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...so I wonder what the real theme of this thread was supposed to be.  I just threw out one possible bone.

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...it’s five minutes to midnight…

I’d rather have a blue sky above me than a blue screen in front of me.

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Posted: 09 September 2012 06:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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First home computer I owned was a BBC Model B.
First home computer I used was, probably, the TRS-80 of an acquaintance, followed by a Sinclair ZX-80 of someone I worked with.
First work computer I used (and actually ended programming on) was an ICL 1904 mainframe (with 6 bit bytes) using a DEC teletype.  When I became a programmer (and moved to London) still had the DECs, but one room had three Elbit monochrome VDUs which were eagerly pounced upon when they became free.
Used various computers, in passing, a Dragon 32, Commodore 64, Commodore +4, an Apple Pet, Atari 520 STe, IBM PC XT (4.77 MHz 8086 processor, 10MB HDD, 2 x 360KB 51/4” floppies).  Somewhere toward the beginning there was a CP/M computer with 8” floppies, but I cannot recall what it was and there was an ealy ‘luggable’ that was, I think, owned by one of our bosses (which could have been the CP/M computer).
First ‘telecomms’ was via an acoustic coupler at 300 baud, followed by comms via coax plugged into an ‘Irma board’ in the IBM PCs we had at work, to communicate with the IBM mainframe (a 3081) that the ICL got upgraded to.

I still have a level of fondness for the ICL 1904, with it’s George III OS.  Lovely command language ... WE COMERR, RP FB,CM ... (if memory serves!) being a good opening line to set error reporting levels (whenever command error, report full but commands).  Thems were the days! smile

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http://www.lizardsofthehost.co.uk/11.html
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http://www.lizardsofthehost.co.uk/7.html

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Posted: 09 September 2012 07:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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Ah the Commodore 64, and the sweet melodious sound of a dot-matrix printer. A page of low res graphics in living B&W in only 3-5 minutes…good times.

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My Renderosity Gallery - My DAZ Gallery - My ShareCG Freebies
We’ve all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare. Thanks to the Internet, we know this is not true.

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Posted: 09 September 2012 09:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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I feel like I got started late. C=64 with dataset (SP? cassette), 8bit 6400 chip set in basic. With a little bitty flip book for a manual.

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Exile, Drows Walk: A Tale of Jaderail starts here. Free pulp fiction at its Fantasy best, Updated 2/3/14.
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Posted: 09 September 2012 09:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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Jaderail - 09 September 2012 09:11 PM

I feel like I got started late. C=64 with dataset (SP? cassette), 8bit 6400 chip set in basic. With a little bitty flip book for a manual.

That’s because it was easier to do animation with a little bitty flip book than with a personal computer…

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Posted: 09 September 2012 09:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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fixmypcmike - 09 September 2012 09:17 PM
Jaderail - 09 September 2012 09:11 PM

I feel like I got started late. C=64 with dataset (SP? cassette), 8bit 6400 chip set in basic. With a little bitty flip book for a manual.

That’s because it was easier to do animation with a little bitty flip book than with a personal computer…

LOL!! True, sprites on the 64 with that mid screen interrupt got me my first week.

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Exile, Drows Walk: A Tale of Jaderail starts here. Free pulp fiction at its Fantasy best, Updated 2/3/14.
Proud Member of the Bald Wizards Club My stuff at DeviantArt

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Posted: 09 September 2012 10:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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Oooh, Commodore 64 for me, typing in pages of numbers to make the simplest game function.  I think the first graphic image was a little balloon you could move across the screen. . .  But back in the office, in a law firm, IBM Selectric and literal cut and paste lengthy agreements - for years until IBM mag cards.  Faxes on a drum.  Oh, how I love technology and all the fun we have with it.

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Posted: 09 September 2012 11:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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First computer I did any programming on was an IBM 1620. I was a high school intern doing some work at an X-ray Crystallography lab. They wanted me to modify one of their programs to crunch the data they were generating. The program converted atomic coordinates from crystal unit cell coordinates to X-Y-Z coordinates. I worked at a different Crystallography lab a year later getting paid to do some similar number crunching and then to construct a 3D model of the molecule from the data. How did I construct the model? The X and Y coordinates of the atoms were marked on two thick sheets of plastic. Holes were drilled at those locations. The plastic sheets were separated with spacers corresponding to the unit cell size. Strings of monofilament fishing line were strung between the sheets at each X-Y location. A little color coded ball of styrofoam was glued to each string at the Z coordinate of the particular atom. That was how physical chemistry scientists were visualizing molecular structures in 1971…

First computer I had at home was an Ohio Scientific (OSI) C2 OEM with a 6502 processor and a dumb terminal on RS-232, 8” floppy disks that were one sided, but you could flip them over and write on the other side. My first home computer game was a TTY based Star Trek game. The next was “Adventure” which was also called Colossal Cave, “Advent” and so on (You are in a maze of twisty little passages, all alike). There were no graphics. Around the same time, I had a Synertek Systems SYM-1 single board computer which used a cassette interface.

The first “real” computer I had at home was an IBM AT. It was a cast-off loaner machine from work that nobody wanted anymore. This wasn’t just any ordinary PC AT. This was an IBM 3270 AT/GX. This was a monster only IBM could build. The 19” monitor alone weighed 75 lbs, and had a warning label on it about the weight! The chassis was an AT, with two hard drives, a video adapter that connected to an external chassis that held the video Ram and a monstrous cable connecting the AT chassis to the video chassis. The monitor had 4 twin-ax cables on it. But wait! There’s more! The AT also had an Opus card with a National NS-32 processor on it that booted System V Unix and ran a schematic program called Valid GED. In full graphics mode, the monitor would do 1024x1024x16 colors. In DOS mode, it would only do CGA, or 640x200x16 colors. The wife learned Lotus 123 on it. I used it for flight simulators F-14, and Chuck Yaeger’s Flight Trainer. In 2000, I hauled this monster along with 3 large boxes of manuals to the Vintage Computer Festival and won Best in Class, Best presentation (completeness), and Best of Show. I never used the machine in 3270 mode as a mainframe terminal, not even at work. The last punch line with this machine is that in one of the ton of original IBM manuals there is a disk labeled (drum roll) Master Control Program. gulp

I still have the IBM, the OSI, and the SYM, but haven’t booted any of them up in years.

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