House of Secrets - Poser & DS

skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
edited October 2012 in Freebies
Post edited by skipper25 on
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  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited August 2012

    An update of my model first issued some two/three years ago.

    This is where it all happens - from grande guignole tragedy to frothy bedroom farce; from 007 to the Three Stooges; from murder most foul to a honey-trap for a prince - where anything can happen and probably will.

    This set is designed to contain as many possibilities for the user as may be possible within a small area and to this end will have no less than 30 - yes, THIRTY - user-adjustables, with doors, windows, curtains, trapdoors etc., etc..

    We start with the basic set shown below. This is all one prop, immovable of course. As we add more and more, these will be made separate props, so that the user may either make them invisible, or operate them. Some places are obvious from the pic below, but be sure that we have other surprises in store.

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  • SimonJMSimonJM Posts: 2,949
    edited December 1969

    30 ways to leave your lover ... ;)

  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    (Giggle) I like your sense of humour.

  • reelyorreelyor Posts: 146
    edited December 1969

    Actually, I see 5 right now.

  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited August 2012

    I'm afraid that the arched doors are dummies. I did think about making them opening, but I've got to stop somewhere!

    OTOH, with the placing of the North panelled wall of the bedroom, you can see the site of six user-adjustables! The flat top behind the wall is of course necessary to make the secret passage dark and mysterious. More tomorrow.

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  • Eustace ScrubbEustace Scrubb Posts: 1,389
    edited December 1969

    SimonJM said:
    30 ways to leave your lover ... ;)

    With this one, it's more like "30 ways to love your levers"....

  • SimonJMSimonJM Posts: 2,949
    edited December 1969

    SimonJM said:
    30 ways to leave your lover ... ;)

    With this one, it's more like "30 ways to love your levers"....


    LMAO :)

  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited August 2012

    (Guffaw) Very witty, Eustace. You ought to be writing gags for Morecambe and Wise. Wait - they're dead! :lol:

    In the pic below you see the latest prop, with a familiar scene over the mantelpiece. You should now be able to pick out the site of eleven user-adjustables, but I will leave you the puzzle of sorting them out. I think that I had better start filling some of these holes before going any further and that's the job for the weekend.

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  • Eustace ScrubbEustace Scrubb Posts: 1,389
    edited December 1969

    Thanks! :red:

    Will we be able to flip the Castle Combe scene down and see Vincent (Price?) Van Gogh still watching our every move?

  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited August 2012

    You remembered!

    Well, this is a make-over, which is to say that everything is being restructured and made more efficient. Most of it will appear to be the same as before, but there will be some obvious differences too ; some things will be moved to another position and I have a couple of entirely new gimmicks. In reply to your direct questions, no, the painting (Cromer) does not flip, but I have a picture of Boris Karloff to watch over everything. He will appear later.

    Post edited by skipper25 on
  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Below you may see the first user-movable prop - the fireplace as (apparently) normal and then as rotated, opening for guys to rush in or a girl to flee a wicked stepmother; whatever. Just don't get burned on your way out.

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  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    To the right of the fireplace is a display cabinet with two sliding glass doors.

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  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    At the other side, the sliding panel is hidden. I have also placed the roof of the four-poster bed.

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  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Here you see how the roof of the four-poster can be lowered to smother the sleeping victims. Here too, the panel is slid to the right.

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  • DorseylandDorseyland Posts: 710
    edited December 1969

    Wait a sec -- did the fireplace rotate in the original model?? If so, I never knew that. If not, is that the point of this revamp (or at least one of the points)?

  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    LOL. Yes, it did!

  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    To the left of the fireplace is the safe, disguised as books - merely for appearance, of course.

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  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Opening this cover door reveals the safe proper.

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  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited August 2012

    Opening the safe reveals the loot. In here there is lots of lovely cash (both dollars and pounds), some document boxes and a jewellry box, texture by courtesy of Tylo Teresa. I really love opening this door over and over in real time - perhaps I was a burglar in a previous life!

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  • SimonJMSimonJM Posts: 2,949
    edited December 1969

    skipper25 said:
    Opening the safe reveals the loot. In here there is lots of lovely cash (both dollars and pounds), some document boxes and a jewellry box, texture by courtesy of Tylo Teresa. I really love opening this door over and over in real time - perhaps I was a burglar in a previous life!

    First name is not Peter is it? I am sure I used to know the derivation of safe-crackers being known as petermen ... ;)

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 19,754
    edited December 1969

    The chemical Saltpetre (potassium nitrate) was used as an explosive during safe blowing by villains. A villain who used it was known as a Petre and this soon became Peterman.

  • SimonJMSimonJM Posts: 2,949
    edited December 1969

    chohole said:
    The chemical Saltpetre (potassium nitrate) was used as an explosive during safe blowing by villains. A villain who used it was known as a Petre and this soon became Peterman.

    Ahhh, I am not sure, now, if I did know - thank you. :)


    Er, mis-spent youth? ;)

  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    How very erudite of you all. No, I am not a Peter, but I still enjoy opening this door, so there!

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 19,754
    edited December 1969

    Depends what you consider Mispent. I spent some time doing re-enactment, ACW re-enactment, and we used ground charges etc, to simulate cannon shot landind. Ie you insert a blank charge in the cannon, and a ground charge to show the cannon ball landing, if you see what I mean. We had a great pryotecnics guy, who was happy to tell us what he was using in his charges, and also things he had come across whilst ding hos research.

  • SimonJMSimonJM Posts: 2,949
    edited December 1969

    That's fun, not mis-spent ;)

  • skipper25skipper25 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    That's fascinating, Cho. Two questions. Did you find that it aided your understanding of history? What sort of role did you play - male or female?

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 19,754
    edited August 2012

    skipper25 said:
    That's fascinating, Cho. Two questions. Did you find that it aided your understanding of history? What sort of role did you play - male or female?


    BBoth actually Skipper. When we were having battles I played a female dressed up as a soldier boy to accompany her man to war, and when we did our indoorfancier shows I was a southern belle, Number 2 husband was 2nd in command of the regiment, so it looked better for the evening shows if I was mostly a female.

    However, and it's a big however, I also used to be flag bearer on parade, so when we did American trilogy at midnight (Pontins holiday camps we were part of the entertainment team when they had Country and Western weeks) I would do a very quick change, Could change form Belle to flag bearer in about 10 minutes. We worked at Hemsby and Prestatyn.

    Mostly though we were taking part in big ACW shows all over the country, most often shows rasising money for cahrity, so I spent more time as the soldier boy than as the Southern Belle. Being slim I could get away with it. I tended to be one of the scruffiest soldiers on the battle field, as everyone on the other side wants to capture the flag, so did get into some scuffles.

    As SImon said, it was great fun.

    AS for the Histroy part of it, I have been told by several people from the Southern States of the US that I know more about the American Civil War than is taught in their schools, and thus often know more than they do.

    Post edited by Chohole on
  • Robert FreiseRobert Freise Posts: 820
    edited December 1969

    chohole said:


    AS for the Histroy part of it, I have been told by several people from the Southern States of the US that I know more about the American Civil War than is taught in their schools, and thus often know more than they do.

    I can well believe that.
    Since anything about any war is just barely taught if at all and then it's usually inaccurate and or prejudiced by personal beliefs or politics

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 19,754
    edited December 1969

    Over here, if you went to the right schools, at the right time, we were taught about Wars, as well as peace time. I was lucky to have an incredible History teacher, history was always one of my favourtie subjects, and judging by exam results also my best subject, Of course for people of my generation Wars like WW2 were too close to be really history, but we still studied the causes of the war. Studying the ACW was something I id after I left school, it grew out of my fascination with Country music and then the re-enactment scene.

    It is very strange, over there you have Ren faires, even though there wasn't a period in your history to equate to the European rennaisance period, over here we have a fascination with the history of the ACW and the American Indians.

  • Robert FreiseRobert Freise Posts: 820
    edited August 2012

    chohole said:
    Over here, if you went to the right schools, at the right time, we were taught about Wars, as well as peace time. I was lucky to have an incredible History teacher, history was always one of my favourtie subjects, and judging by exam results also my best subject, Of course for people of my generation Wars like WW2 were too close to be really history, but we still studied the causes of the war. Studying the ACW was something I id after I left school, it grew out of my fascination with Country music and then the re-enactment scene.

    It is very strange, over there you have Ren faires, even though there wasn't a period in your history to equate to the European rennaisance period, over here we have a fascination with the history of the ACW and the American Indians.

    I guess that makes it seem somehow more exotic or fascinating
    Maybe because it happened elsewhere

    By the way looking forward to the re release of this Skipper

    Post edited by Robert Freise on
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