Digital Art Zone

 
   
2 of 3
2
Toon Pro help! 
Posted: 08 January 2013 07:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
Member
Rank
Total Posts:  142
Joined  2011-08-12

I don’t think I’ve ever encountered a more stupid and unfriendly way to trial a product than Toon! Pro’s, it’s ridiculous.
I do plan on buying the shader though

Here are two videos I stumbled across that show it off pretty well
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UIwzp581y9w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSR_BzNudTc

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 11:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15
jaakay - 08 January 2013 05:29 PM

Hi Holly,

Thank you for your response.

I suppose it is just a matter of playing with the settings until you get what you want.

It would be nice to see some renders that other people have managed to get out of using this plugin.

Thanks again.

Jaakay

I’ll post a couple of Toon Pro renders and you can tell me if it’s what you’re looking for. If so, I’ll go into more depth.

 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 02:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

So I wanted to start off with something that is pretty much straight out of Carrara w/ like 1% PS post, mainly for the lettering there and then I’ll post some stuff that has a little more post work.

Image Attachments
DETECTIVE_POSED.jpg
 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 02:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

Here’s something with more stylistic background effects, but still retaining the Carrara-only toon effect on the character. I like this method if you’re doing an animation. Basically you’d just batch queue your PS files and render as a PNG sequence.

(FYI everything I do in Carrara is PNG images/sequences)

Image Attachments
Detective_walking.jpg
 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 02:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

This is with post work to the actual character and a limited amount on the background. For non-animation, quick single images, this is probably my favorite style.

Image Attachments
Wizard.jpg
 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 02:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

This is a more “dumbed down” version of the previous image. But a similar approach.

Image Attachments
Sarge.jpg
 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 02:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

Not really a finished image, but something I’m in the process of finalizing for comic book work. Needs more post work between the sky and buildings. This would probably be the most “advanced” approach because it requires a lot of hands-on manipulating. For the average user (not looking to, say, publish comic book art), this probably isn’t needed.

Image Attachments
Swing_test.jpg
 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 02:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

Here is using this approach with a moving image. Ironically, this wasn’t really a “toon” test. It was just a general movement test as I’m still in the process of learning Carrara (aren’t we all?) But this gives you a pretty good idea of what it looks like in motion.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuxLfOj3LmM

 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 02:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

This was an early YAToon-only test. I found that, IMO, YAToon doesn’t really hold up. The palette is odd to work with and seems limited.

(the background is non-CGI)

Image Attachments
Girl_yatoon.jpg
 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 02:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

This is the same YAToon + ToonPro effect on a more toon-style character.

I’ve never used the Toon Land people (I think that’s what they’re called). But I assume it’d work pretty nicely on them.

Image Attachments
Swing_Guy.jpg
 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 02:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

I think if I were ever to seriously consider doing a “toon style” animation, I’d probably need another step in my workflow. I really like the overall pallet of the characters using YAToon and ToonPro, but that final line art layer that Cripeman developed is probably needed to really push it to the next level.

Though I believe (though I’d have to try it myself), that probably if you just duplicated the figure layer (PNG sequence) in AE and expanded it by, say, 5%, and then blacked it out to give a nice thick black line surrounding the character, that could certainly be sufficient. The key with ToonPro is that the *light* is the definition of the character. So light placement is key. You’re basically creating form via shadows. The line art function in ToonPro, while I am completely smitten with it as far as solid, non-animal items (buildings, vehicles, robots, et al), is dangerously subpar for character work. I think you’d have a better time simply rendering out a “green screen” non-photorealistic “sketch” render (so, basically non-photorealistic on green background), and then keying out the green in AE and applying the sketch on top of your finished colors. But just like with ToonPro, you’ll have to monitor the depth of your lines throughout. A line that works in a close up shot will completely drown out your character in a wide shot.

 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 03:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

I think the biggest advantage for all us non-expert types is that when you’re using toon type features, you can really get creative with what’s accessible to you. I had this character that I needed to create for my series, but there’s no way that I would have been able to create him to any considerable effect in traditional CGI style. But because it’s more of a “toon” style, I can fudge on things like his big bushy hairy arm there.

Image Attachments
Red.png
 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 03:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
New Member
Total Posts:  7
Joined  2009-08-16

Hi BC Rice,

First of all, thank you so much for posting all that work.  It is great to see!

My problem is this, I use a program called Anime Studio.  I don’t draw very well so tend to trace some of my characters and then I have to bone rig them and make sure that everything is working well.  This can be very time-consuming.  I decided I would try and mix 2D and 3D together to try and make animations, however I like the toon look.  I thought, rather than rigging my characters in Anime Studio, I would use some of my 3d content and toonify them so that I can work with both programs together.  I quite like the image with the Scout in the green shirt as he looks very toonified (if that is a word) grin and would blend in with a 2d environment.

It would be really nice to know exactly what settings you used and also what you do with the lighting to get this look.

I agree that saving out to a png sequence is the best way.  I can then import this sequence into Anime Studio.

Thanks again for uploading all those lovely images.

Jaakay

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 04:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15
jaakay - 09 January 2013 03:19 PM

Hi BC Rice,

First of all, thank you so much for posting all that work.  It is great to see!

My problem is this, I use a program called Anime Studio.  I don’t draw very well so tend to trace some of my characters and then I have to bone rig them and make sure that everything is working well.  This can be very time-consuming.  I decided I would try and mix 2D and 3D together to try and make animations, however I like the toon look.  I thought, rather than rigging my characters in Anime Studio, I would use some of my 3d content and toonify them so that I can work with both programs together.  I quite like the image with the Scout in the green shirt as he looks very toonified (if that is a word) grin and would blend in with a 2d environment.

It would be really nice to know exactly what settings you used and also what you do with the lighting to get this look.

I agree that saving out to a png sequence is the best way.  I can then import this sequence into Anime Studio.

Thanks again for uploading all those lovely images.

Jaakay

I think you mean the little toon looking guy? Like the one that isn’t a traditional DAZ model?

All of these are done in the same fashion. The only difference is that the ones with the line art are created using FLASH/PS. Whereas the ones without the lineart are almost exclusively rendered in Carrara.

Here’s the breakdown as quick and dirty as I can give it, and I’ve attached another pic to sort of inform the context:

1) Go to your model’s hierarchy. Click just undernearth the model name (e.g. Victoria). Click on “MODEL. From the top tabs, click SHADERS. That will give you the list of everything you need to change. And yes, you need to change everything. Individually, by hand.

2) Click on your first shader. Say, “SkinTorso”. You will then be in the TEXTURE interface.

3) Change the TOP SHADER to MULTI-CHANNEL MIXER (it can be found under the bottom COMPLEX SHADERS tab)

4) You will now have two SOURCES. One source will be near the bottom of the other one, so it’s easy to miss. Once you click the arrow it will open like the first one. Once each source shader is completed, I’d advise closing them both to keep things tidy.

5) Go to SOURCE ONE. This is where you will swap MULTI-CHANNEL for TOON PRO.

6) Go to SOURCE TWO. This is where you will swap MULTI-CHANNEL for YATOON

7) If you haven’t done so already, Clear out any TEXTURES and BUMP MAPS from your MULTI CHANNEL shader tab located under SOURCE ONE and beneath TOON PRO. You made need to do the same under SOURCE TWO, depending. These should be replaced by your own textures or solid colors. Gradients are pretty pointless. Just make sure that when you’re using a color, you write down or remember the color’s numbers you’re using. I like to click on the little color box so that the in-depth guide appear, and after I have a color I like, I then round all of the numbers to a solid digit so it’s easier to remember as I move through an asset’s shaders.

8) Under SOURCE ONE, click on the TOON PRO tab. Here you make your adjustements based on whether the asset you’re changing is skin or clothing. The picture attached shows the importance of undulation and gradation in skin/hair tones—a gradation that doesn’t apply as well to clothing.

          a) TOON PRO SKIN SETTINGS: Shadow/Highlight: 25 - 1000%
                                                Levels: 1
                                                Shadow Brightness: 60%

          b) TOON PRO CLOTH SETTINGS: Shadow/Highlight: 55 - 1000% (varies for darkness of cloth)
                                                    Levels: 1
                                                    Shadow Brightness: 30%

9) Under SOURCE TWO, click on the YATOON tab. Here there is no need to distinguish between skin and cloth. Being off by even a few digits can change your render from having a nice, smooth two-tone look to just looking terrible and pixelated.

          a) YATOON SETTINGS: Brightness 80, Softness 100, Edge 100, Line Edge 70, Line Hardness 20, Specular 5, Specular  
            Softness 100, Specular Edge 100, Line Brightness 75

10) Close SOURCE ONE and SOURCE TWO tabs by clicking their corresponding arrows. At the bottom of the hierarchy will be the BLENDER tab. Click that and set your value at 50%/

This is the brief and quick to it. You’ll need to do this for every single shader. So, for instance, if a hair model has 10 parts, you’ll need to do this to each of its ten parts.

I’ll address further your additional workflow in a moment.

 

 

 

 

Image Attachments
Tant.png
 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 January 2013 04:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  340
Joined  2011-05-15

So for your workflow, blending 3D and traditional animation is certainly a possibility, but the look you’d end up with would be very specific and you would have to decide what your (realistic) end goal would be.

If you’re just doing ninjas or robots that don’t speak or something, that you can probably accomplish using the format I supplied here. You can apply that to any model you utilize inside Carrara.

If you’re looking to adapt your 3D images to blend with your traditional plate and have speaking roles, et al, you might end up getting into something more severe. I went down a similar path, but in the end I decided to keep the two worlds separate on the project I’m working on.

I’ve attached what would have been the final character result of a Carrara/Flash blended character. To me, even with the assistance of Mimic Pro for lip sync, it made more sense to simply utilize a traditionally rigged Flash head in conjunction with a 3D body. But in order for them to line up effectively, the only option is the dreaded ROTOSCOPE. That means you’d have to frame-by-frame trace your character. There is no rendering scenario wherein you’d line up perfectly with any artwork you created digitally. Not even on the major studio level.

I decided that it was better for my sanity to simply hand draw all of the key frames and then store them in a “symbol” and reference as needed. I’m not sure how your animation program is put together, but most programs allow you to pile a bunch of key frames inside of a symbol so you can simply reference those key frames when needed—like when lip syncing, etc.

Image Attachments
Flash_DAZ.jpg
 Signature 

Patron the creation of Outstanding Pajamas: http://www.patreon.com/BCRice

 

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 3
2