PC vs Mac

zairdragonzairdragon Posts: 0
edited December 1969 in The Commons

I am upgrading to a new computer and have done tons of research, but I'm still undecided. So I wanted to ask other daz users your opinion. I have looked at both PC and Mac. I have always been a PC user, but now that my renders are more complex I wonder about going with a Mac. Also should I go with a laptop or a tower? What do you all think?

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Comments

  • jmperjmper Posts: 0
    edited July 2012

    I like Mac but I will give you my opinion:
    PC - Less compatibility issues especially dealing with Studio
    Tower - More cost effective, i.e. you pay more for a laptop with the same specs as a desktop. Screen size as well, most laptops allow for connecting to a separate screen but then what is the point between that and the desktop.

    *Also depending on how you feel about upgrading, towers are a lot easier to upgrade than a laptop. Laptops are limited in what can be upgraded.

    Post edited by jmper on
  • jmperjmper Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Also, complex render.
    Graphics card = Choppy viewport when you load up things / move camera to pose, a better graphics card can help with that.
    Processor Cores number/speed + RAM = Faster renders, handles more complex scenes

  • jmperjmper Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    For a screaming fast computer at just a little extra...buy two drives.
    One SSD that is big enough to fit the OS on.
    A second standard hard drive that is 1TB or more to install all programs and such on.


    With your OS on the SSD, the boot process and windows functions will be screaming fast.

  • mathias7212mathias7212 Posts: 27
    edited December 1969

    This is a more emotional response from a Mac user: I just bought a new
    iMac this weekend and had it up and running with Studio 4 in ten minutes.
    So far I have had no problems. As a computer illiterate that is what I want.

    The only reason I would consider a PC is the compatibility issues
    mentioned. There are a few useful plug-ins (?) that are PC-exclusive.
    And I also agree with previous poster regarding laptop vs desktop.

  • jmperjmper Posts: 0
    edited July 2012

    Oh and one other thing I forgot to add...
    If you choose windows, you will want to get the 64bit version, preferably WIN7 Ultimate. Allows for more RAM and 64bit software that can access that RAM.

    Post edited by jmper on
  • AscaniaAscania Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    jmper said:
    I like Mac but I will give you my opinion:
    PC - Less compatibility issues especially dealing with Studio
    PC - More compatibility issues due to far larger hardware variety and prevalence of low-end semi-compatible hardware elements hidden somewhere in the system dragging the whole thing down.

    Tower - More cost effective, i.e. you pay more for a laptop with the same specs as a desktop


    Mac Tower - More bang for the buck but higher outlay even for the lowest end one.

  • larsmidnattlarsmidnatt Posts: 3,477
    edited July 2012

    I use PC and Mac but I will tell you something. A mac will not be superior to a PC, it can be equal to it but cost you more to get there. I say this only because you say "my scenes are more complex so I was thinking about MAC". Not necessary. A better PC will do fine.

    I'm not going to fuel the MAC PC war, like I said I use both. But being practical, if you use a PC now then it will be a smoother transition. Be sure to get 64bit OS though.

    If you wanted to go mac for other reasons than take the jump :)

    Post edited by larsmidnatt on
  • Zev0Zev0 Posts: 3,642
    edited December 1969

    I use PC with win7 64 and Mac OS10. For Hardware - Go PC. CHEAPER to upgrade. All that makes a mac is the OS. And that you can get for PC.

  • ssgbryanssgbryan Posts: 699
    edited December 1969

    I use PC and Mac but I will tell you something. A mac will not be superior to a PC, it can be equal to it but cost you more to get there. I say this only because you say "my scenes are more complex so I was thinking about MAC". Not necessary. A better PC will do fine.

    I'm not going to fuel the MAC PC war, like I said I use both. But being practical, if you use a PC now then it will be a smoother transition. Be sure to get 64bit OS though.

    If you wanted to go mac for other reasons than take the jump :)


    As someone who owns both a Mac Workstation (MacPro 1st Gen) and a PC Workstation (Dell Precision 690 from 2007) - I have to disagree with you here. The Mac was a little more expensive (about $100), but is a lot easier to maintain and you can easily get 5-6 years out of it. The Mac tends to be a "fire and forget" solution. You don't have to deal with "Patch Tuesday", driver issues, antivirus issues, etc. Looking at TCO, the Mac is a no-brainer.

    If you are working complex scenes and needing more than a couple GB of memory, the MacPro is the way to go. Ram maxes out at 128Gb, you can put 5 hard drives in stock & up to 10 Hds with some aftermarket items. With up to 24 virtual CPU's rendering times will be limited to the software.

    Rendering is bottlenecked by the amount of ram and cpu cycles you can throw at it. This is where the MacPro leads the way.

  • zairdragonzairdragon Posts: 0
    edited July 2012

    jmper said:
    For a screaming fast computer at just a little extra...buy two drives.
    One SSD that is big enough to fit the OS on.
    A second standard hard drive that is 1TB or more to install all programs and such on.


    With your OS on the SSD, the boot process and windows functions will be screaming fast.

    I have considered a two drive system. I currently have a HP touchsmart 64 bit. I love it, its just too small now. I have far too much content loaded. What is the OS acronym stand for? There is some stuff I'm still learning. oops, brain cramp OS stands for operating system. I'm assuming I will need a tower to do this.

    Post edited by zairdragon on
  • Kendall SearsKendall Sears Posts: 1,888
    edited December 1969

    As someone with hardware from all over the spectrum here's my 2 cents.


    Hardware wise the PC and Mac are now equivalent. To get a PC to the same equipment level/quality as what is in a Mac, the prices will be equivalent. I'm not talking about the NewEgg, Tigerdirect clearance of the last cheap Videocard etc, but *EQUIVALENT* quality.


    Since Apple went Intel, internally the Mac is simply a PC with higher quality parts and a firmware restriction. The biggest difference is in the OS.


    MacOS is a Posix OS: meaning that it has all of the stability and security inherent to Posix. It also inherits some of the user unfriendlyness of Posix. In order for Apple to compensate for this they had to make some compromises. And of course, Apple is Apple and you'll compute their way, on their terms.


    Windows is Windows. It has no security worth mentioning, but allows for more access to the hardware for applications than does MacOS. I leave the question of stability to common sense. Depending on the necessary support software (firewall, virus, drivers, etc) performance will vary.


    Now, which is better for you? Only you can answer that. Do you worry about Viruses a lot? MacOS is better. Do you want to customize your system your way? Windows is better.


    Want to get the best of both? Go Linux. (just kidding, Linux is no panacea)


    Kendall

  • pcicconepciccone Posts: 411
    edited December 1969

    I would suggest to go for a Mac. This is not a matter of comparing hardware, that is not the whole story, in fact it's not even half of the story.

    Mac OS is a system designed for the artisticly-inclined person. The way it works, the way it feels is less about technical matters and more about the natural interaction of human-with-computer. This is not a statement against Windows, Windows has been traditionally a technical OS, Mac OS is a art-oriented OS. That is why so many people in artistic fields, form painting to movie editing and everything in between, use Macs a lot.

    It's hard to describe, it's a feeling, a way it fits in the artist's mind. It's not about specs and Ghz.

    At the hardware level Mac use top notch components and are engineered to high levels of excellence. I switched to the Mac in 2004 and I owned, since then, 3 MacBookPros, and eMac, and my current machine, a MacPro 8-core tower system. Loved them all, loved the way they don't get in the way of what I do, which is what a computer should do, IMHO. If I have to setup a network server I do need to get my hands dirty. For my everyday work, I want a machine that fits right and allows me to work my 3D art and code in a natural way. The combination of Mac and Mac OS is what I believe is the natural choice for anybody involved in art.

    All the best.

  • FSMCDesignsFSMCDesigns Posts: 1,272
    edited December 1969

    I use PC and Mac but I will tell you something. A mac will not be superior to a PC, it can be equal to it but cost you more to get there. I say this only because you say "my scenes are more complex so I was thinking about MAC". Not necessary. A better PC will do fine.

    I'm not going to fuel the MAC PC war, like I said I use both. But being practical, if you use a PC now then it will be a smoother transition. Be sure to get 64bit OS though.

    If you wanted to go mac for other reasons than take the jump :)


    Having used both myself, this and what Kendall Sears said is pretty much my experience. It comes down to personal choice, not one being better than the other. Get what you can afford and what works for you.

  • zairdragonzairdragon Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    I appreciate everyones opinion that posted. I has helped me narrow down my options.. Thanks!!

  • Zev0Zev0 Posts: 3,642
    edited December 1969

    Lol you only had two to begin with:) whatever way you go enjoy the new rig.:)

  • larsmidnattlarsmidnatt Posts: 3,477
    edited December 1969

    Zev0 said:
    Lol you only had two to begin with:) whatever way you go enjoy the new rig.:)

    What about WebOS?

  • Zev0Zev0 Posts: 3,642
    edited December 1969

    The op was asking what rig to get. IE either pc or mac as far as I understand.

  • larsmidnattlarsmidnatt Posts: 3,477
    edited December 1969

    Zev0 said:
    The op was asking what rig to get. IE either pc or mac as far as I understand.

    Was teasing.

  • Zev0Zev0 Posts: 3,642
    edited December 1969

    lol I suck at getting jokes:(

  • larsmidnattlarsmidnatt Posts: 3,477
    edited December 1969

    Zev0 said:
    lol I suck at getting jokes:(

    Pretty sure it's my bad for failing at humor :(

  • Zev0Zev0 Posts: 3,642
    edited December 1969

    lol I think its because I have no idea what webOS is:)

  • TotteTotte Posts: 7,079
    edited December 1969

    Zev0 said:
    lol I think its because I have no idea what webOS is:)

    Was, I think HP killed it (they bought it from Palm) last month.

    On the PC/Mac discussion I can say that I use Macs, but sometimes you see plugins or extra programs that are Windows only, but as many stated here, a PC with the same parts and specs are as expensive as as Mac Pro. I usually use a classic car metaphore. You can get a cheap Asian hatchback in corrugated plate with wooden seats much cheaper than a BMW, and it's as fast as the BMW as wells long as it stays on the road at that speed, but you lack the comfort and the quality of the BMW.

  • edited December 1969

    I have a Mac laptop that's been operational and issue-free for over seven years. True, it cant go anywhere now in terms of the system hardware, but I still use it for lower end work. I fully expect the same performance out of the MacBook Pro I now own.

    Yes, you pay more, but you get to keep it for a longer time.

  • ruekakaruekaka Posts: 271
    edited December 1969

    Non technical, but if this is important for you...

    Apple withdraws all products from EPEAT environmental ratings
    http://www.geek.com/articles/apple/apple-withdraws-all-products-from-epeat-environmental-ratings-2012079/

  • TaozenTaozen Posts: 2,245
    edited December 1969

    Zev0 said:
    I use PC with win7 64 and Mac OS10. For Hardware - Go PC. CHEAPER to upgrade. All that makes a mac is the OS. And that you can get for PC.

    You can run OS10 on a PC? Can you also develop Mac programs on it?

  • FixmypcmikeFixmypcmike Posts: 12,378
    edited December 1969

    One thing I'll toss in that my niece encountered recently. Whenever I get a PC laptop serviced under warranty, I pull the hard drive first. Pulling the hard drive from a Mac invalidates the warranty.

  • Richard HaseltineRichard Haseltine Posts: 19,982
    edited December 1969

    Taozen said:
    Zev0 said:
    I use PC with win7 64 and Mac OS10. For Hardware - Go PC. CHEAPER to upgrade. All that makes a mac is the OS. And that you can get for PC.

    You can run OS10 on a PC? Can you also develop Mac programs on it?

    It is possible to run the version before Lion, if you can still find a copy, on some non-Apple hardware. But it's fiddly to set up - I did look into it and rather took fright. As far as I know all tools, including coding, are available though of course you'd be hard put to know whether a problem was inherent in your code or down to the "Hackintosh"'s limitations.

  • GeddGedd Posts: 2,474
    edited December 1969

    Real artists use Mac! hmm, wait... I'm using a pc. Well my monitor is a Mac, and um... I have a Mac webserver... welll...

    j/k ;)

    Real artists use whatever tool works for them ofc. What you might want to ask yourself is, how technically oriented are you, and how much time do you want to spend maintaining your system. The Mac as pointed out has a better user interface, is in general more solid and requires less effort on the part of the user. The PC is more flexible with other programs you might want to use, add-on hardware, and one other thing... if you do have a question about something, since more people use PCs you are more likely to get a quicker answer to how exactly to do something. But that does come at the price of having a less stable system in general then a Mac (for various reasons I won't go into.) As for price of the system, Macs have a pretty stable price point for what you get whereas PCs prices go all over the map. One can get much more power for less money on a PC *but they can also get ripped off easily and get much less.* The PC market is *not* at all related to you get what you pay for, rather you get what you're knowledge will get you. The Mac market on the other hand charges a premium (yes still, compared to what I can build as a knowledgeable builder.) for ease of use, stability, good UI. For many people, the Mac ends up being a much better deal because this all equates to how much something *really* costs you. Remember, when the system isn't working, it's still degrading in value and one is left sitting on their hands.

  • TaozenTaozen Posts: 2,245
    edited December 1969

    Taozen said:
    Zev0 said:
    I use PC with win7 64 and Mac OS10. For Hardware - Go PC. CHEAPER to upgrade. All that makes a mac is the OS. And that you can get for PC.

    You can run OS10 on a PC? Can you also develop Mac programs on it?

    It is possible to run the version before Lion, if you can still find a copy, on some non-Apple hardware. But it's fiddly to set up - I did look into it and rather took fright. As far as I know all tools, including coding, are available though of course you'd be hard put to know whether a problem was inherent in your code or down to the "Hackintosh"'s limitations.


    OK, thanks. Doesn't sound like a good solution, better to get a Mac then I guess...

  • SlimerJSpudSlimerJSpud Posts: 859
    edited July 2012

    If you ever intend to use Bryce, get a PC. Bryce does not work with the latest Mac OSX releases (Lion or later) and there is no ETA on getting that situation fixed. :-/


    Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit will make use of up to 16GB of Ram. If you have a system with more than one physical cpu (never mind how many cores), then you do need Win 7 Professional, Enterprise or Ultimate. Ultimate is not a bad way to go, but why spend more if you are not going to go beyond 16GB, or more than one cpu? At the high end, there are Engineering Workstations that go way beyond what a Mac Pro offers, but these machines can run from $5-10K at the low end to well over $100K.
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa366778#physical_memory_limits_windows_7
    Edit: Oh, and go with a tower. I would never do serious rendering on a laptop. Once you get beyond the basics and want to do real cpu and memory intensive renders, you need the power and expandability of a tower. That is, unless you own stock in Alienware. :-P

    Post edited by SlimerJSpud on
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