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Make a living as a creator on Daz3d?
Posted: 18 September 2013 11:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 76 ]
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I want to thank all PA that came here to talk and share their stories (ups and downs during their product sales). I support Daz Studios and its creators, please don’t ever force people to use DIM or DRM, Keep it simple and rightfully honest Daz Studios. Here are some thoughts on Piracy: People pirate products because they are low income, really want a product, hate DRM, do not support the company, want to try before they buy, etc. But like someone said “There are more honestly good people than crooks”. here are my two pennies worth.

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Posted: 19 September 2013 02:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 77 ]
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Seems to me that ownership is being taken away slowly and instead is being replaced with a short term loan option. It’s all being locked in to specific hardware, tablets, phones etc. The days of having your own archived material whether it be books, CD’s DVD’s are fading fast.
That’s why I detest the whole cloud idea. Notice how they make these intrusive things sound soft and fluffy-  ‘cookie’, ‘cloud’.

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Posted: 19 September 2013 03:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 78 ]
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Bobeagle77 - 18 September 2013 11:59 PM

I want to thank all PA that came here to talk and share their stories (ups and downs during their product sales). I support Daz Studios and its creators, please don’t ever force people to use DIM or DRM, Keep it simple and rightfully honest Daz Studios. Here are some thoughts on Piracy: People pirate products because they are low income, really want a product, hate DRM, do not support the company, want to try before they buy, etc. But like someone said “There are more honestly good people than crooks”. here are my two pennies worth.

I definitely qualify as low income—I’m not even to 100% of the poverty line yet this year in income thanks to being stuck in a very long dev cycle process on some things slowly beginning to see the light of day at long last, so I have less sympathy than I might for the ‘low income’ reasoning; in this economy, most of us are right there, too. While many of the people who have spoken up here are making much bigger money, it needs to be noted that that is not often the typical vendor experience in this market (here, or on other sites).

The really sad thing is, I see at least 10 illegal downloads for every one sale at a minimum, and usually considerably more than that… so the more good people thing, well. I’m hoping it will eventually become true! :) That said, my main objection to DRM is that it tends to introduce more bugs that it will ever solve problems, so I don’t see an upside to using it even in those circumstances unless someone comes up with a genuinely brilliant solution that doesn’t have those issues.

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Posted: 19 September 2013 06:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 79 ]
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People have to remember there are 500+ PAs here at DAZ,  all the way from full time top seller down to part-time hobbiest with a product or two.  Just like any industry,  there’s a top 10% who make the lion share of products and revenues.  Most can’t make a living at this,  some can.  You need talent,  technique, creativity,  knowledge,  perseverance,  drive,  ambition,  marketing,  discipline and good old fashion hard work.

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Posted: 19 September 2013 06:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 80 ]
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...and even with all of that, there are no guarantees. (Which is the short form of saying there’s no formula of qualities that will guarantee you aren’t facing real risks.)

For instance, many vendors will want to do something genuinely new tech-wise—but that means spending a lot of time in trial and error. These products can swallow up a lot of time, and it’s time you may never actually get compensated for investing. I’m personally finally seeing one of these cycles pay off pretty well, but I’m still making up for that time investment and will be for some time, which amounted to almost a full year with no releases while it was all going through extensive tire-kicking. That kind of risk is not something people mention often, but it takes a lot of planning and a lot of backbone to go there. Usually, it will pay off—but it’s a long view with a lot of lean time to be considered. (DZfire mentions this as well; you have to plan for it well in advance if you can!)

The good thing about this is that the current marketplaces are willing to take the risk to gamble on this as well because it usually pays off for them. That’s a second layer of potential trouble to consider when making your plans in most cases that we’re very lucky to avoid most of the time. It tends to depend on just how niche the product is. You see a great response to things like the alternate render solutions and various plugins that involve new tech more than you would making, say, the very best animated virtual turnip twiddler on the market.

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Posted: 19 September 2013 07:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 81 ]
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surreality - 19 September 2013 06:47 AM

...and even with all of that, there are no guarantees. (Which is the short form of saying there’s no formula of qualities that will guarantee you aren’t facing real risks.)

For instance, many vendors will want to do something genuinely new tech-wise—but that means spending a lot of time in trial and error. These products can swallow up a lot of time, and it’s time you may never actually get compensated for investing. I’m personally finally seeing one of these cycles pay off pretty well, but I’m still making up for that time investment and will be for some time, which amounted to almost a full year with no releases while it was all going through extensive tire-kicking. That kind of risk is not something people mention often, but it takes a lot of planning and a lot of backbone to go there. Usually, it will pay off—but it’s a long view with a lot of lean time to be considered. (DZfire mentions this as well; you have to plan for it well in advance if you can!)

The good thing about this is that the current marketplaces are willing to take the risk to gamble on this as well because it usually pays off for them. That’s a second layer of potential trouble to consider when making your plans in most cases that we’re very lucky to avoid most of the time. It tends to depend on just how niche the product is. You see a great response to things like the alternate render solutions and various plugins that involve new tech more than you would making, say, the very best animated virtual turnip twiddler on the market.

It’s important to commit time to innovation and learning on top of your regular output, definitely.  Learning new things has always paid off well for me.  The week I spent figuring out figure setup paid HUGE dividends in subsequent ability to do pose-controlled rigs with lots of bones, for instance.  Five extra bones for a sleeve or mane will never look like a big job to me again after the 800 bones in the Captain’s Daughter from the Articles of Punishment set!


Right now forum chat has nudged me in the direction of learning how to do ERC controllers for series of morphs.  I think it will prove interesting. grin  The important thing for anyone is not to get tunnel vision and just keep making the same thing over and over; that way lies burnout.

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Posted: 19 September 2013 07:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 82 ]
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FirstBastion - 19 September 2013 06:33 AM

You need talent,  technique, creativity,  knowledge,  perseverance,  drive,  ambition,  marketing,  discipline and good old fashion hard work.

Absolutely.  smile

And its funny… when I read this I realized that every single person I’ve offered to mentor in this field has lost interest as soon as they realize its real work.

None of the programs I use have a “make art that makes me money” button.  Alas!

I think this is the type of work that you either love, or hate.  And even when you love it, there are times when you’re seriously considering the ease of flipping burgers at a fast food place because its much easier than the headache you’re going through on this project or that. 

The passion is what keeps me here.

~Bluebird

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Posted: 19 September 2013 08:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 83 ]
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Yes you have to love otherwise your inspiration and drive will die in a flash, rsulting in average products, and low sales. You have to up your game every single time, and sometimes that can be a tall order.

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Posted: 19 September 2013 09:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 84 ]
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Zev0 - 19 September 2013 08:20 AM

Yes you have to love otherwise your inspiration and drive will die in a flash, rsulting in average products, and low sales. You have to up your game every single time, and sometimes that can be a tall order.

Thats what actually keeps me going….I love the challenge of trying to “up the game” with each new release.

RAwn

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Posted: 20 September 2013 03:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 85 ]
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SickleYield - 19 September 2013 07:02 AM

It’s important to commit time to innovation and learning on top of your regular output, definitely.  Learning new things has always paid off well for me.

As Rawn said,  always up the game.  To quote a recent movie,  “Movement is life”

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Posted: 01 October 2013 10:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 86 ]
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surreality - 19 September 2013 03:27 AM
Bobeagle77 - 18 September 2013 11:59 PM

I want to thank all PA that came here to talk and share their stories (ups and downs during their product sales). I support Daz Studios and its creators, please don’t ever force people to use DIM or DRM, Keep it simple and rightfully honest Daz Studios. Here are some thoughts on Piracy: People pirate products because they are low income, really want a product, hate DRM, do not support the company, want to try before they buy, etc. But like someone said “There are more honestly good people than crooks”. here are my two pennies worth.

I definitely qualify as low income—I’m not even to 100% of the poverty line yet this year in income thanks to being stuck in a very long dev cycle process on some things slowly beginning to see the light of day at long last, so I have less sympathy than I might for the ‘low income’ reasoning; in this economy, most of us are right there, too. While many of the people who have spoken up here are making much bigger money, it needs to be noted that that is not often the typical vendor experience in this market (here, or on other sites).

The really sad thing is, I see at least 10 illegal downloads for every one sale at a minimum, and usually considerably more than that… so the more good people thing, well. I’m hoping it will eventually become true! smile That said, my main objection to DRM is that it tends to introduce more bugs that it will ever solve problems, so I don’t see an upside to using it even in those circumstances unless someone comes up with a genuinely brilliant solution that doesn’t have those issues.

I confirm, I’m a new content creator with only 4 products, and I was looking for feedback or images made with my products : I found illegal content instead!!!
Having a rapid look at the numbers of downloads when they were displayed, I also saw at least 10 to 30 illegal downloads for one sale - and this with a simple search, not watching all the sites, so, there probably are many things I probably did not see.
It made me really sad, I expected this would happen, but not in such a big volume. Now I try not to think about it.
My worry is that the upcoming generation has a culture of piracy. When I speak with teenagers, it is normal for them to have everything free on the web. Downloadable? Then free! They do not even have the consciousness that this is robbery.
So when these young people will become the next DAZ users, will there remain enough honest people to go on with creating content? This I don’t know….

I’m very interesting in this topic, since one of my goal is to become a full time content creator. I’ll have a deeper look at it as soon as possible.

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Posted: 02 October 2013 02:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 87 ]
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Yes, you can make a living, just like I do, fulltime since 2006.

(No, I don’t have a job, and neither to I want one… wink )

However, it takes dedication and effort to make it work, like with everything else in life. What you put in, is what you get out.
I never make any income claims, but with the right kind of products, (lots of them too), and the right kind of dedication & persistance—you can make a living.

If you take a look at any successful vendor here at DAZ, they all have a unique style, they do what they are good at and they all have not one, but tons of products. So, it’s an ongoing journey.

Just like everything else in life… wink

Actually, I’ve made a step by step guide for this, and it’s called 3D Model Master. You can find it here at DAZ:
http://www.daz3d.com/3d-model-master

udgang99 - 16 September 2013 05:12 AM

Hey guys,

I was wondering if any of you guys have an idea wether a creator here on Daz3d can actually make a living, making stuff for the 3d store?
I mean, people like Stone Mason, Antfarm aso have been around for years, and have an impressive amount of stuff in their stores ...

Of course, it’s all about the quality of the products the creators produce, but are there buyers enough for a good 3d-creator to make a living?

I’m just currious. wink

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Posted: 02 October 2013 04:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 88 ]
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Hi! Sorry for my English, it´s not perfect.!! grin
Good thread anyway, hmm. I have been using Daz programs since the beginning and have a huge library. A couple of 100.000 pieces todday. I have also used other programs like Maya (even on the Amiga computer), Cinema Vue bla bla bla…
Making 3D for 25 years.

I have tried to be creative in my way to use 3D in many ways. It´s not possible to do only one thing in order to make money.
The problem with Daz products has been the instability and low knowledge how to develop the products in right way.

I have used 3D in:
Scenography (introduced 3D in schools) for theather and filmmaking.
Working environment planning ( how to make a good working environment)
Interior design
Making pictures for newspapers, books commercials.
Selling pictures (www.mostphotos.se)
3D models
Animations for music videos, working environment.

Yes you can live on this but you need to make a lot of marketing and be creative towards the customers.
You can make your own stories and sell with your animations and pictures of cource.

But only making 3d models and sell on Daz or renderosity is not enough for living.
However the freedom to be anywhere in the world and work with your computer is great!!!

Take care folks!!!

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Posted: 17 October 2013 04:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 89 ]
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Thanks to everyone here for this interesting and enlightening conversation. I have been digging for information like this for some time and happily stumbled onto this thread. As someone who has been successfully self-employed (freelance) for decades in a parallel creative field, and has managed to support a family, pay for two college educations and live comfortably, I agree wholeheartedly with many of the observations stated previously about working for yourself. Hard work, dedication, commitment, honing your skills through practice and always working to improve and innovate as the market and technology advances are all key to being successful.

Personally, I am interested in getting into this particular discipline and marketplace because I have always loved dabbling in 3D design and digital art creation of almost any kind. The DAZ marketplace (and I suppose others like Renderosity, although I am less familiar) seems to provide a unique and deep “hobbyist to professional” customer base to pitch 3D tools and products to. I only want to do this because I really enjoy the pure process of creating, and that is primary for me. After spending many years doing a different kind of “creative” work that became SO commercial and corporate it was absolutely mind-numbing, making money doing 3D would be nice, but it is definitely secondary. I am blissfully happy just learning and creating. And being inspired by people like you.

Thanks again!

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Posted: 17 October 2013 04:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 90 ]
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It’s probably an re-iteration of what she has already said, but SickleYield has recently posted this: http://fav.me/d6qt6sg over on devaintART.

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