Does anyone know what kind of spider this is?

DanaTADanaTA Posts: 7,333
edited December 1969 in The Commons

I know it's nothing to do with 3D art. I just saw this today in my garden and wondered what it is. I've never seen one like this before. It's a little blurry because I had to enlarge it some.


I live in southeastern Massachusetts, if that will help narrow it down. I couldn't find it by searching the web.


Dana

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Comments

  • McGyverMcGyver Posts: 943
    edited June 2012

    It appears to be some variety of "Jumping spider". We have tons of them on Long Island, some can get a little over 1/4" of an inch in size. I actually find them quite cute... though annoying if you are spray painting stuff.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_spider

    Sorry I cant tell you exactly which type... But I have seen that pattern before... well, more or less.

    Post edited by McGyver on
  • DanaTADanaTA Posts: 7,333
    edited December 1969

    I think this one was about a half inch. I could be wrong, though. I wish I could find it online but there seems to be inadequate species identification available. Thanks.


    Dana

  • TaozenTaozen Posts: 2,121
    edited December 1969

    It appears to be some variety of "Jumping spider". We have tons of them on Long Island, some can get a little over 1/4" of an inch in size. I actually find them quite cute... though annoying if you are spray painting stuff.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumping_spider

    Sorry I cant tell you exactly which type... But I have seen that pattern before... well, more or less.


    I thought they were cute too until one of them jumped right at my finger and bit me when I tried to play with it. They (or at least some of them) are very aggressive.

  • JaguarEllaJaguarElla Posts: 10,370
    edited December 1969

    you couldn't find it by searching the web? %-P
    (perhaps it is a non-web building spider)

  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,199
    edited December 1969

    you couldn't find it by searching the web? %-P
    (perhaps it is a non-web building spider)

    badumdum

  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,199
    edited December 1969

    btw your spider looks to be Phidippus clarus, one of many species of Jumping spider. Like all spiders it is venomous, but it is mostly harmless. Unlike most spiders, jumping spiders have very good vision, these ones can see better than your cat.

  • DanaTADanaTA Posts: 7,333
    edited December 1969

    btw your spider looks to be Phidippus clarus, one of many species of Jumping spider. Like all spiders it is venomous, but it is mostly harmless. Unlike most spiders, jumping spiders have very good vision, these ones can see better than your cat.


    Thanks, I'll look that one up later...it's about supper time. Anything can see better than my cat...I don't have a cat! I'm allergic to them. I love cats, as all of nature, but my nose and lungs don't care for them. Once a friend had a little kitten that had these needle-like claws. It merely jumped up on my lap. I had welts from where it stuck it's tiny claws. :down: Years ago, I would go to another friend's house and we'd jam for an hour or two on guitars. He had two cats. When I went home, my breathing was like when I was young and had asthma. He started closing the door or closing them in another room. I felt bad for them. Dogs don't have that effect on me, well so far anyway.


    Dana

  • DanaTADanaTA Posts: 7,333
    edited December 1969

    you couldn't find it by searching the web? %-P
    (perhaps it is a non-web building spider)


    :long: :-P


    Dana

  • DanaTADanaTA Posts: 7,333
    edited December 1969

    Looks like that was correct, and it's the male, too. Thank you!


    Dana

  • K T OngK T Ong Posts: 359
    edited June 2012

    Maybe you've discovered a new species!

    I must catch one of those, bombard it with some radiation and then let it bite me, so I can go out and do some swinging around wearing that full-body lycra suit Andrew Garfield gave me... :coolsmirk:

    Post edited by K T Ong on
  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,199
    edited December 1969

    I used to raise exotic animals for the pet trade. Mostly Snakes and Reptiles, but I also had a number of species of Tarantulas, Scorpions and giant Insects. I got really good at looking up various species. I have reference books at my work station because just about ever day someone comes to me and asks "what is this critter?"

  • K T OngK T Ong Posts: 359
    edited December 1969

    I wonder which species it is specifically that bit Peter Parker?... :-)

  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,199
    edited December 1969

    K T Ong said:
    I wonder which species it is specifically that bit Peter Parker?... :-)

    it never says in the books. If I had to guess it was most likely a common barn spider, Araneus cavaticus, same species as Charlotte :) despite the name they are quite common inside houses and businesses. Any dark humid place with a plentiful food source will do.


    If I had my choice it would be an Argiopes. More common in gardens than radioactive laboratories, but I just think the Argiope is a kooler looking spider and they build amazingly beautiful webs. If I was going to get bit by a radioactive spider it would be an Argiope.

  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,199
    edited June 2012

    the Argiope just looks like something that could turn you into Spider-man

    Argiope.jpg
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    Post edited by LycanthropeX on
  • LedheadLedhead Posts: 1,586
    edited December 1969

    the Argiope just looks like something that could turn you into Spider-man

    I've always called them garden spiders and I hate them. I think they are one of the scariest looking spiders. Of course I don't like any spiders except jumping spiders cause I think they are cool and mean little bastards.

  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,199
    edited June 2012

    Most spiders are harmless. The argiope is no exception. They can be aggressive, but if you leave them alone they will leave you alone. They are good to have in the garden as they are voracious eaters and greatly reduce the number of harmful insects.

    There are very few dangerous spiders in the world and even the ones that are dangerous have a far worse reputation than they deserve. The American Black Widow, Lactrodectus mactans is the most venomous spider known to man and even a bite from one of them is rarely fatal. Next in line would be the Australian Red Back also in the Lactordectus species, then the Sydney Funnel Web, Atrax Minatrix. Then probably the brown recluse or fiddle back spider. There are also some other Lactrodectus species like the brown widow. But other than that, most spiders are no threat to humans at all. All spiders are beneficial as they reduce insect populations. Especially flies. The common house fly is far more dangerous than any spider. The fly caries on average over 1000 deadly diseases and bacteria on its body at all times. Remember that the next time one lands in your potato salad.

    Post edited by LycanthropeX on
  • K T OngK T Ong Posts: 359
    edited June 2012

    I still feel uncomfortable with most spiders, nevertheless. They're just... creepy. (Though I think centipedes -- those critters belonging to the Scolopendra family -- are ever creepier.)

    If I was going to get bit by a radioactive spider it would be an Argiope.

    I gather a tarantula's bite would turn one into something more like Venom. :lol:

    Post edited by K T Ong on
  • Scott LivingstonScott Livingston Posts: 4,100
    edited December 1969

    For future questions of this sort, I recommend http://www.whatsthatbug.com/

  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,199
    edited December 1969

    K T Ong said:
    I still feel uncomfortable with most spiders, nevertheless. They're just... creepy. (Though I think centipedes -- those critters belonging to the Scolopendra family -- are ever creepier.)

    If I was going to get bit by a radioactive spider it would be an Argiope.

    I gather a tarantula's bite would turn one into something more like Venom. :lol:




    Speaking of Tarantulas, I just learned something I didn't know. While not particularly dangerous, the venom of the King Baboon Tarantula from Africa is quite hallucinogenic. I used to have a bunch of King Baboons in my collection. Never got bit by one so I never knew of the effects of the bite. Mine had over half inch long fangs, i'm thinking I would not want to get bit by one. As big as those things were, they were not the largest spider in my collection. My biggest spider was an African Goliath Tarantula, the 2nd largest spider in the world. Almost as big as the South American Bird Eater. My largest Goliath had an 11.5 inch leg spread and 1 inch fangs. They were suppose to be a really aggressive species, but mine were big babies, they ran and hid in their burrows when ever you walked into the room.

  • JaguarEllaJaguarElla Posts: 10,370
    edited December 1969

    I am pretty sure I was bitten by a redback
    felt cold clammy feverish, got a festering sore
    ached all over for weeks
    only a few people actually die from them, most just feel ill like I did.
    never occured to me to seek serious medical advice like hospital testing, I took an antihistamine, doctor just said it was a spiderbite but since I was still alive obviously not fatal gave me antibiotics for the blistering bite.
    my shed WAS FULL OF REDBACKS no other spider so the odds were pretty good it was one.
    my yard is redback city, all my outdoor furniture has em underneath and big egg sacs
    I am allergic to poisons so the lesser or two evils!

  • DanaTADanaTA Posts: 7,333
    edited December 1969

    I've gone in another direction. Since I bought my house in 2001, I have really gotten into the birds. I never knew there was so much variety here. I got a great book, The Sibley Guide to Birds, and it has helped me identify all the birds that I've seen. Even a couple that were considered rare in my area. I have three feeders in my yard, though lately I haven't kept them filled...money issues, it gets expensive. But I enjoy the other wildlife, too.


    Dana

  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,199
    edited December 1969

    i got my bird feeders, i have quite a variety coming in on a regular basis.

  • Cyn ArtCyn Art Posts: 0
    edited June 2012


    Speaking of Tarantulas, I just learned something I didn't know. While not particularly dangerous, the venom of the King Baboon Tarantula from Africa is quite hallucinogenic. I used to have a bunch of King Baboons in my collection. Never got bit by one so I never knew of the effects of the bite. Mine had over half inch long fangs. . . [snip]


    For some reason this reminds me of the "Malcolm in the Middle" episode where Hal gets bit in the face by a Tarantula. Kind of looked like the beginning of a close encounters peak. lol


    And cute little spider, Dana! I kind of have a love/hate relationship with the little jumping spiders. When they jump on me I call out, "Oh!" But afterward, I start giggling. :P ~ Fearless little critters, they are! LoL


    Of course, I like that they're little. Wouldn't be the same if they were big . . . like this bionic one. :long:


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85uA-QXeqxg&feature=related
    Looks like he's driving it a little better here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqolwulVlsc&feature=related

    Post edited by Cyn Art on
  • s l fs l f Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    I am pretty sure I was bitten by a redback
    felt cold clammy feverish, got a festering sore
    ached all over for weeks
    only a few people actually die from them, most just feel ill like I did.
    never occured to me to seek serious medical advice like hospital testing, I took an antihistamine, doctor just said it was a spiderbite but since I was still alive obviously not fatal gave me antibiotics for the blistering bite.
    my shed WAS FULL OF REDBACKS no other spider so the odds were pretty good it was one.
    my yard is redback city, all my outdoor furniture has em underneath and big egg sacs
    I am allergic to poisons so the lesser or two evils!

    If you've got problems with redbacks Wendy, try introducing DaddyLongLegs into the mix, They love eating redbacks and their mouths are too small to bite people. ;-)

    When I first shifted into this house there were redbacks everywhere but luckily some Daddylonglegs had hitched a ride in my possessions so now I rarely see a redback.

  • K T OngK T Ong Posts: 359
    edited June 2012

    Can the daddy long legs actually handle redbacks? Daddy long legs seem so... fragile...

    Some spiders actually have a surprisingly beautiful color. Such as the Singapore Blue tarantula shown below (Lampropelma Violaceopes).

    They still look creepy, though. Spiders are spiders!

    TarantulaSingaporeBlue01_10.jpg
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    Post edited by K T Ong on
  • DanaTADanaTA Posts: 7,333
    edited December 1969

    That is a beautiful spider! My mom would have mixed feelings about it...she loves blue, and especially royal blue, which that seems to be, or close to it...but I don't think she's fond of big spiders. :lol:


    Dana

  • flashbackflashback Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Black Widows are common in E. Texas. I've seen several in the grocery store where I work. And while fatalities are rare, (mostly due to the availability of anti-venin) it is one of the most painful bites in nature. Survivors have described it as feeling like "being roasted alive". It can last for weeks too. If you ever go camping in Widow country, check your shoes before putting them on in the morning, they like dark places.

  • ValandarValandar Posts: 653
    edited December 1969

    I personally don't like spiders, but I would still rather use a piece of paper to carry one outside the house if one came in as opposed to squishing it. No matter how much I dislike them, I dislike the bugs they eat more. :D

  • ColdrakeColdrake Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    The American Black Widow, Lactrodectus mactans is the most venomous spider known to man and even a bite from one of them is rarely fatal.


    Actually the Black Widow is the most venomous spider in North America. The Brazilian Wandering spider is the most venomous spider in the world.


    Coldrake

  • LycanthropeXLycanthropeX Posts: 2,199
    edited December 1969

    Coldrake said:
    The American Black Widow, Lactrodectus mactans is the most venomous spider known to man and even a bite from one of them is rarely fatal.


    Actually the Black Widow is the most venomous spider in North America. The Brazilian Wandering spider is the most venomous spider in the world.


    Coldrake



    Phoneutria species have been shown to have more toxic venom in lab test, but fatal bites on humans are far rarer than with Lactrodectus. Some believe the fangs of Wandering spiders are too small and weak to deliver a fatal bite on a human. What ever the case is, Lactrodectus has a far greater documented death toll on humans than Phoneutria. At any rate, fatal bites on adult humans are very rare for both species. Children, Elderly and those with other medical conditions are most at risk, A healthy adult has a very good chance of surviving a bite from either species.

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