Polycount: How Relevant is it? PAs?

chikako_8af55a8a68chikako_8af55a8a68 Posts: 55
edited December 1969 in The Commons

A topic of discussion I am interested in, maybe also of interest in any who vend. How important is polycount, and by extension, loading times that can be associated with high polycounts?

Let me preface this with a little background. Now and then I get customers who...

- Want to load up lots and lots of models at once (In our case, models that have 100% complete interiors as well as exteriors)
- Get annoyed and angry that load times are long when importing high poly models into already heavily populated scenes

Most of the brokerages I know in the Poser/DS vending community do not list polycount. Id guess that people are find with eyeballing products and then making an educated guess if its appropriate or not for their use.

What do you all think? Should the Poser/DS community post polycounts?

Comments

  • adamr001adamr001 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    I, for one, wouldn't mind seeing it. Does it stop me from buying things? No, not generally, but I have an above average machine and I'm quite used to the pitfalls of working in large scenes with DAZ Studio. :)

  • DzFireDzFire Posts: 724
    edited December 1969

    I wouldn't mind putting it in my future product read-me's. Though, you may want to be seated before reading it ;)

  • DaWaterRatDaWaterRat Posts: 1,555
    edited December 1969

    For myself, as long as the vendor warns that a given item has an exceptionally high polycount, I don't need to know the specifics. But it's not something I'd mind seeing either.

  • PendraiaPendraia Posts: 2,522
    edited December 1969

    High polycount is of interest, mainly as I would like to keep polycount down where possible. That doesn't mean that I won't buy high poly items but I would avoid an item that seemed excessively high for what it is.

    The polycount should suit the purpose of the model.

    My favourite modellers are people like Stonemason who keeps the polycount down where they can through using good maps for displacement, bump etc....

  • Kendall SearsKendall Sears Posts: 1,883
    edited December 1969

    Polycount, for me, is a fact of life. Most of my work ends up with several million polys by the time I'm done. I once had a DS4 scene that took a week to save (yes, a WEEK -- well, 10 minutes shy of being a complete week) those in the freepository got running updates while it was happening. My DS save files can be well over 250Meg in size, and my Maya scenes are massive!


    That being said, I will always go for a higher poly model if the polys are justified. I wouldn't be happy if a square post was 100 polys just for the sake of having more polygons. However, I'd rather have polygonal leaves than transmaps for example.


    Kendall

  • macleanmaclean Posts: 1,009
    edited December 1969

    My favourite modellers are people like Stonemason who keeps the polycount down where they can through using good maps for displacement, bump etc….


    I agree up to a point. Remember that lots of textures can slow down your scenes just as fast as lots of polys, so indiscriminate use of disp and bump is often counter-productive. But when used correctly, maps are good. (I'm not saying Stefan does this - just in general).

    I've recently done several full-on house models, and I'm finishing a Bungalow right now. I've tried every way possible to figure out how these models could be loaded in two parts - interior and exterior - with the exterior only being used for scenes where no interior is needed - but it's nigh impossible. As soon as you remove the interior, the house looks incomplete. Parts like windows have to be modelled fully, or it shows up even for exterior-only use. About all you can get away with is removing things like baseboard and molding, sockets and switches, etc.

    My average for an entire interior/exterior house with all parts posable, seems to be around 40-50k polys. I'm beginning to tend to the view that if it's less than the average human figure, it's usable.

    mac

  • Zev0Zev0 Posts: 3,589
    edited December 1969

    A polycount would be nice. That way we will know exactly what our scenes can handle, and our rigs for that matter.

  • PendraiaPendraia Posts: 2,522
    edited December 1969

    maclean said:
    My favourite modellers are people like Stonemason who keeps the polycount down where they can through using good maps for displacement, bump etc….

    I agree up to a point. Remember that lots of textures can slow down your scenes just as fast as lots of polys, so indiscriminate use of disp and bump is often counter-productive. But when used correctly, maps are good. (I'm not saying Stefan does this - just in general).

    The polycount should suit the purpose of the model.
    My favourite modellers are people like Stonemason who keeps the polycount down where they can through using good maps for displacement, bump etc....

    Hi Mac, please do not take my words out of context. I had stated also that the polycount should suit the purpose of the model. I agree with you wholeheartedly that things like window frames should be modelled. I could have equally used you as an example as you also do very good work or someone like FirstBastion whose sets are also of a good quality. Please note that this is not an exclusive list of who do good models. Only a few examples of people whose work I tend to buy.

    thanks

    Pen

  • frank0314frank0314 Posts: 8,648
    edited December 1969

    Kind of a good rule of thumb when looking at models. If they detail is modeled into the prop it is going to be higher poly. We cut as much poly as we can out of model but depending on the detail it could get to be around 60k poly on a model. I try to make all my models below 50k but sometimes it is really hard to do depending on which modeling app you are using. If you are using 3DSMax is can get highly detailed models with low poly because of how the app handles poly. I'm using Silo, so it don't handle poly the same way so my models tend to be on the heavier side compared.

  • PendraiaPendraia Posts: 2,522
    edited December 1969

    Frank0314 said:
    Kind of a good rule of thumb when looking at models. If they detail is modeled into the prop it is going to be higher poly. We cut as much poly as we can out of model but depending on the detail it could get to be around 60k poly on a model. I try to make all my models below 50k but sometimes it is really hard to do depending on which modeling app you are using. If you are using 3DSMax is can get highly detailed models with low poly because of how the app handles poly. I'm using Silo, so it don't handle poly the same way so my models tend to be on the heavier side compared.

    That's a really good point Frank, modelling programs do handle polys differently and that can impact on the work flow.

    Just wanted to mention that one of the reasons I used artists who do a lot of landscape as an example is that is one area that uses a lot of polys and can quickly slow a machine down even on their own without anything else in the scene.

  • BarubaryBarubary Posts: 947
    edited June 2012

    Pendraia said:
    My favourite modellers are people like Stonemason who keeps the polycount down where they can through using good maps for displacement, bump etc....

    This is kind of a bit beyond my current understanding of the software, but doesn't effective use of displacement maps require at least a certain amount of polygons?

    I'm recently running into this a lot with Reality, where I'm trying to apply a displacement map to, let's say, a brick wall and end up having to subdivide it a million times for the map to have any effect at all. Sure it's still easier on the scene, but rendering still takes a lot of time. Not to mention the time it takes me to find out how many subdivisions are needed :D

    Post edited by Barubary on
  • Richard HaseltineRichard Haseltine Posts: 19,409
    edited December 1969

    That depends on the application - some, yes, use displacement only to move existing vertices but others, including the Poser and DAZ Studio native render engines, can subdivide the real polygons to generate enough for any desired level of displacement (this is one of the things that Shading Rate affects).

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