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Using HDRI software to enhance Carrara renders
Posted: 28 February 2013 05:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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holly wetcircuit - 28 February 2013 11:24 AM
JoeMamma2000 - 28 February 2013 01:41 AM

An HDR image used for that purpose generally is a 180 degree spherical image of an environment….

There is no such thing as a 180° spherical. smirk

Well, yes there is…

The image you take is of a sphere, but since you are shooting the reflective sphere with a camera you are limited to taking only a 180 degree image of a sphere. A 180 degree spherical image. “Spherical” defines a shape, “degrees” defines how much. It’s an image of a 180 degree portion of a sphere.

Now, if you only wanted to play “prove Joe wrong”, then carry on. But if you wanted to extract the POINT of what I was saying, then I’m sure you can understand what the point was, correct?

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Posted: 28 February 2013 05:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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3DAGE - 28 February 2013 08:27 AM

Photoshop is a Photo editor,. and in real life, sometimes the perfect image is over, or under exposed,. The “Exposure” function in PS allows you to adjust that,. or,.. if you intentionallly want to create over or under exposed images you can obviously do that too.

Yes, Andy, I think we all know what exposure is. But that’s not the point.

The OP was talking about getting that “HDR look” in his Carrara renders, correct? He wanted to us a “HDR maker” software to convert three images (normal, over, under) into an HDR image, correct?

So I suggested that IF he wanted to use that software, he could do a normal render in Carrara, where the final render is perfectly exposed, then run that perfectly exposed image thru PS, use the Exposure adjustment, and develop the over and under exposed versions. Once that was done he could run those thru the HDR software.

Why everyone is talking about a “normal” image that is poorly exposed is beyond my comprehension. If you’re getting that normal image from a Carrara render why would it be anything less than perfect?

Yes, you can use an ND filter to get the under exposed version, but how about the over exposed version? Like I said, just adjust the lights in the scene over and under and you’re done. The time we’ve spent discussing this you could have done this to 12 different scenes and have your results. Unless this is just an exercise in coming up with the most optimum and effective methodology for something you’ll use twice in your lifetime….

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Posted: 28 February 2013 06:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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@Joe,

The idea is that a badly lit render might be blown out in the highlights - ie no details in the highlights that you can access via PS
It also might be too dark in the shadows - showing no details in the shadows that PS can resucitate.

So the idea is to do a few different renders that can access these details via weighting the tonal range to the black end or the white end and combine them via the HDR software.

It’s just another way of “skining the same cat”.

To merely take an image into PS and then do under exposed and overexposed versions so you can combine them in the HDR software is not going to give you an advantage of revealing details that weren’t accesable in that initial image.

I think Jim’s idea is worth looking at.

Of course it’s not the easiest way for someone who is familiar with Carrara but it could give suprising results.

Exploring new methods of working is the beauty of doing this “work”.

@Jim, glad the ND filter rang a bell!

The Oloneo Engine appears worth a look at but is $149. You can change the effect of your apparent light sources in a render/photograph

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Posted: 28 February 2013 06:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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head wax - 28 February 2013 06:13 PM

The idea is that a badly lit render might be blown out in the highlights - ie no details in the highlights that you can access via PS It also might be too dark in the shadows - showing no details in the shadows that PS can resucitate.

You guys give me a headache….

If you want a “normal” render that is going to be used as the basis for an HDR image, and you want it to have a full range of lighting, then RENDER IT WITH A FULL RANGE OF LIGHTING !!! No different from a photo from a camera that’s going to be HDR…..

If you don’t want dark areas that don’t add to the dynamic range, then DON’T HAVE DARK AREAS !!! And if you don’t want blown out highlights, then render it WITHOUT BLOWN OUT HIGHLIGHTS !!!!

Geez, I need a beer or something….

 

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Posted: 28 February 2013 06:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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It’s alright Joe,
I don’t think I mentioned “normal” render.
I guess I didn’t explain myself well enough.
Best to forget about it eh?
cheers for your beer

wink

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Posted: 01 March 2013 05:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Yes, Andy, I think we all know what exposure is. But that’s not the point.

No,.. You “Assume” that everyone knows,..  wrongly. .. and it’s exactly the point.

Try to learn when people are agreeing with you,. then you may not feel the need to attack them.

The OP was talking about getting that “HDR look” in his Carrara renders, correct? He wanted to us a “HDR maker” software to convert three images (normal, over, under) into an HDR image, correct?

yes,. Exactly,. also ,... Photoshop already has the ability to make an HDRI from the three, or more images.
See; FILE / Automate / Merge to HDR.

So I suggested that IF he wanted to use that software, he could do a normal render in Carrara, where the final render is perfectly exposed, then run that perfectly exposed image thru PS, use the Exposure adjustment, and develop the over and under exposed versions. Once that was done he could run those thru the HDR software

which is exactly what I mentioned previously when i suggested using Photoshop (exposure) to create the Under / Over exposues, from a single render earlier in the thread.,.. and is what Mark Bremmers tutorial explains.

It’s the simplest. fastest, and most effective way to get where the OP wants to be,...
Until we have the ability to export as 32bit directly from carrara.

 

 

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Posted: 01 March 2013 06:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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I see we have another thread that needs a reminder to keep it civil - please consider yourselves reminded, and refrain from commenting on others perceptiveness, intelligence or manners. If you can’t make your point without personal comments it isn’t worth making.

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Posted: 12 December 2013 11:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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Hi FD and Fenric, any more news on either fronts here?

I just bought oloneo photo engine 89 bucks on special and used Carrara and oloneo to make my first HDRI from three spherical camera renders. I did a crappy job but it’s early days yet - but it worked!

Oloneo has a few other things for doing your post and and tone (al?) mapping that really have the possibility of adding zap to your renders, you can change the contrast in detail areas as well as globally.

you’ve probably seen Gkdantas little video ? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ng11d9IvJI which covers relighting as well, in which Oloneo gives you the ability to bring in three differently lit renders and adjust the light sources to suit.


was it Ascania who suggested working on a raw file? I guess that was from a camera and not Carrara ?

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