Digital Art Zone

 
   
4 of 13
4
Carrara Portrait Lighting
Posted: 07 September 2012 02:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 46 ]
Addict
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4938
Joined  2006-08-27
Roygee - 07 September 2012 12:54 AM

Really like that last one, EP. smile

I’m having a bit of a battle with the rim lighting - about the only way I can get it, but not very well controlled is to use a distant light behind the subject, pointed at the camera.  Usually I end up with backlighting instead of rim.  What settings are you using for the rim light?

Saw a really great exposition of lighting by a master - it is not Blender specific, although the demo at the end of the video is done in Blender.  The planes he uses can be likened to carrara’s AG. http://www.blenderguru.com/videos/mastering-lighting

Here’s my effort at a portrait - three-point lighting.wink


The rim light I used is a spotlight set at 200%. I used one for dynamic hair because of the way it handles the light. If I was using prop or figure hair I sometimes use two rim lights. See screen shots for relative positions. I’ll also upload another image where I used figure hair and set two rim lights to highlight the hair.

Image Attachments
Summer_1.jpgTwo_rim_lights.pngPicture_2.pngPicture_3.pngPicture_4.png
 Signature 

I find it somewhat liberating not to be encumbered by accuracy.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 September 2012 05:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 47 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1059
Joined  2007-10-15

Here’s an image using only a single ring flash. Aside from giving what I call a “fashion mugshot” look, it is used to highlight the eyes, because when properly tweaked (which I didn’t take time to do) it gives a kind of mesmerizing, very bright and dynamic ring-shaped highlight in the eyes, as well as sharp and bright highlights on the rest of the subject. Since it is mounted on the camera, it is directly in the line of sight from the camera to the object, which means that it will cause many highlights which will be seen by the camera. Which is one reason why my most common lighting setup includes a spotlight parented to, and zeroed with the camera.

But this is just one of many different techniques that are used for various purposes. Another very common (and somewhat cliched) one you see, especially in corporate and interview and instructional videos and portraits is background lighting, where the subject is “separated” from the background by having a brightly colored spot (often a deep, cool blue) shooting a splash of light against the background. So instead of a kicker (rim) light, and when they don’t care about the “hair halo” you get from a standard rim light, they light the background, which also serves multiple purposes.

Image Attachments
RingFlash.jpg
Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 September 2012 06:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 48 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1059
Joined  2007-10-15

And here’s the same character giving an interview on 60 minutes, or doing a corporate/instructional video…

Image Attachments
RingFlash_007.jpg
Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 September 2012 07:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 49 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1059
Joined  2007-10-15

By the way, if you’re going to use a rim light, I’m sure you know this already but make sure you have some sort of translucency set up on your hair shader (or use SSS, etc.) and make sure the lights are set thru transparency. Otherwise you’ll crank your intensity up real high and still only see a little bounce light, not the “hair halo” you might want.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 September 2012 07:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 50 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1059
Joined  2007-10-15

And here’s what I call the standard “Glamour Shots/Senior Prom” portrait with a very distinct rim light that is extremely common, and some might say outdated and overly cliched. This used a single kicker behind the subject, 100% intensity, with some high values of translucency on the hair shader.

Image Attachments
RingFlash_008.jpg
Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 September 2012 08:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 51 ]
Addict
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4938
Joined  2006-08-27
JoeMamma2000 - 07 September 2012 07:13 PM

By the way, if you’re going to use a rim light, I’m sure you know this already but make sure you have some sort of translucency set up on your hair shader (or use SSS, etc.) and make sure the lights are set thru transparency. Otherwise you’ll crank your intensity up real high and still only see a little bounce light, not the “hair halo” you might want.


Sometimes the only way is with prop or figure hair, so that suggestion is something to think about. I hadn’t considered using a translucency. I think I would skip the SSS for my part-Takes waaay to long as it is. I can only image it applied to a mess of transmaps.


Personally, I love the dynamic hair with a few exceptions. I don’t even bother using it for animation at this stage due to my aging system, and you have to be careful about post-render effects and volumetric effects such as clouds. As long as the hair doesn’t appear behind or intersecting a volumetric cloud it can be used with cloud just fine.

 Signature 

I find it somewhat liberating not to be encumbered by accuracy.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 September 2012 08:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 52 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1059
Joined  2007-10-15
evilproducer - 07 September 2012 08:51 PM

...so that suggestion is something to think about. I hadn’t considered using a translucency. .

Yeah, actually that’s what the effect of a kicker is in real life. It’s light shining thru the translucent hair fibers and causing a kind of glow. Actually it’s a form of SSS where light bounces around inside the hair fibers then comes out. Which is why you only see it around the edges where the hair is thinner and translucent, versus the interior where it’s all bunched up and thick and light can’t pass thru.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 September 2012 10:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 53 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1288
Joined  2008-01-01

A lot of very good points being made here.  When I was referring to rim lighting, what I had in mind is the very subtle edge of light seeping around from behind - as shown in EP’s pic of the sphere.  After lots of experimenting, I found that shape lights give me a lot more control and predictability in getting that effect.

Joe’s tip about the ring flash is really good - I used a shape light around the lens and it really brings out the eyes - thanks.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 September 2012 11:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 54 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1948
Joined  2008-01-28

Joemama wroteth:

Yeah, actually that’s what the effect of a kicker is in real life. It’s light shining thru the translucent hair fibers and causing a kind of glow. Actually it’s a form of SSS where light bounces around inside the hair fibers then comes out. Which is why you only see it around the edges where the hair is thinner and translucent, versus the interior where it’s all bunched up and thick and light can’t pass thru.

thanks for the headsup on that, great effect

 Signature 

http://andrewfinnie.blogspot.com.au/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 September 2012 11:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 55 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  433
Joined  2012-04-01

Excellent thread and information! 5-star rating! The forum is really missing a “Thank You” button.

If you have the time to upload the scene files to for example ShareCG or whatever, it would be greatly appreciated.
Otherwise I will try to build scenes after the instructions above, to have a “Portrait Lights” set in the browser, that I feel is missing in Carrara now.

Even for a noob like me it should be possible by starting with:
http://www.sharecg.com/v/49996/view/7/Material-and-Shader/Carrara-7-Studio-scene

To be continued…

 Signature 

Everything about Carrara: http://www.carraracafe.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 September 2012 12:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 56 ]
Active Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  433
Joined  2012-04-01

Found a commercial Daz Studio item that is somewhat related to the topic:
http://www.daz3d.com/shop/fashion-studio

 Signature 

Everything about Carrara: http://www.carraracafe.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 September 2012 03:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 57 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1059
Joined  2007-10-15
Roygee - 07 September 2012 10:32 PM

When I was referring to rim lighting, what I had in mind is the very subtle edge of light seeping around from behind - as shown in EP’s pic of the sphere.  After lots of experimenting, I found that shape lights give me a lot more control and predictability in getting that effect..

I hesitate to mention this because I’m sure everyone’s aware of it, but just in case…

I know this wasn’t your intent, but technically light really doesn’t seep around the edges of stuff. Unless it’s a glow from translucency like we already discussed, or some SSS glow because of the properties of the material make it translucent, generally solid objects block light from behind and you won’t see any ring of light around the edges.

So if you want to have a ring of light around the edges, you’ll have to specifically light the object for that. And how you do that depends totally on what effect you want. Since it’s a very rarely used effect, and not something that normally happens in real life, there really are no standard methods used, and you’ll just have to experiment by placing light sources at the right angles to get the effect you want.

I’d be curious to see what specifically you’re trying to achieve.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 September 2012 04:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 58 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1059
Joined  2007-10-15

My first ring flash image didn’t really capture the effect very well, so here’s a re-take using some higher intensities (like 130% for the flash intensity). Still only one light in the scene, an anything glows ring with soft shadows.

Note the effect of the ring causing a sort of halo around the character’s head. A little “hip-er” than the ‘old’  rim light effect. A lot more “immediate” and “in your face” than the old, and softer glamour shot with the strong rim light.

Image Attachments
RingFlash_009.jpg
Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 September 2012 10:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 59 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1288
Joined  2008-01-01

I hesitate to mention this because I’m sure everyone’s aware of it, but just in case…

I know this wasn’t your intent, but technically light really doesn’t seep around the edges of stuff. Unless it’s a glow from translucency like we already discussed, or some SSS glow because of the properties of the material make it translucent, generally solid objects block light from behind and you won’t see any ring of light around the edges.

So if you want to have a ring of light around the edges, you’ll have to specifically light the object for that. And how you do that depends totally on what effect you want. Since it’s a very rarely used effect, and not something that normally happens in real life, there really are no standard methods used, and you’ll just have to experiment by placing light sources at the right angles to get the effect you want.

I’d be curious to see what specifically you’re trying to achieve.

OK - to be more precise - “Has the appearance of light seeping around the edges.”

Rim lighting is a well-known photographic term and is distinguished from back lighting or kicker in that the aim is to get a rim of light, as opposed to a flood of light to separate the subject from the background.  It happens in the real world and is in common use in films and photography.  Google the term and get 7 million hits.  Here are some really good examples.http://www.lightstalking.com/rim-light-portraiture

Here’s one I did to get that effect using a shape light - that subtle glow on the edges of the shoulder and the hair is what I was after, as opposed to the earlier one I did where I could only get back lighting.  Also showing my setup.

 

 

Image Attachments
rimlit.pngrimlightsetup.png
Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 September 2012 01:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 60 ]
Power Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  1059
Joined  2007-10-15

Ahhh, okay, so you’re looking for what I refer to as “sidelighting” and “toplighting” to get the ring of light due to direct lighting I was referring to. Maybe the below image shows a bit of what you’re trying to get? In that one I did a very narrow spot to her direct right side to give that ring of direct light on her right cheek, and a very narrow spot on her left side above her head pointing down at the side of her head.

Typically that’s how photographers get the ring of light you’re referring to, by placing spots to the side or top of the subject. Ring lights that are about 20ft in diameter are in short supply. (just a joke…)

Image Attachments
RimLight_005.jpg
Profile
 
 
   
4 of 13
4