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Carrara Portrait Lighting
Posted: 13 September 2012 02:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 106 ]
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booksbydavid - 13 September 2012 09:14 AM

I’ve subscribed to both 3D World and 3D Artist for years, and while I realize that doesn’t make me a professional, it does allow me an insight into the lives, thought processes and workflow of MANY 3D professionals. The one thing I’ve learned is that there are NO hard and fast rules for creating art. Several years of artist interviews show that every artist approaches his/her craft differently. Sure some things just ARE like lights light things, and color colors things but the art is in how you use those ‘hard and fast’ rules.


And here’s why I love you guys so much…

I’ll spend many hours providing examples, renders, detailed explanations, reasoning, and the results of my experience and professional training, and in return you will dismiss it with nothing more than “no, you’re wrong”, and cite some magazines you’ve read.

Are you serious? You can’t even provide one shred of rational thought or discussion on any one of the 30 or 40 examples and (dare I say it) “rules” I listed. And I’m supposed to take you seriously, and treat you with respect? This is exactly why I get so frustrated with some of you guys, and criticize you. Unbelievable.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 02:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 107 ]
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booksbydavid - 13 September 2012 09:39 AM

Just as an aside, what about savants. There are records of savants who just started creating amazing artwork or music with no prior instruction and in some cases no prior experience at all.

Okay, I’m not going to argue with this one, because with a little bit of thought you’ll realize that the example you’re giving has absolutely no relevance whatsoever. Savants play by the same musical rules as everyone else.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 02:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 108 ]
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Roygee - 13 September 2012 02:23 PM

So, we may as well tear out the page about yellow indoor lighting?

Another one we can tear out is the one that espouses the conventional wisdom that uplighting the face engenders emotions of fear, horror, et al.

Okay, Roy, why not do this…

Stop trying to pick at every single example I gave in an attempt to dismiss what I said because you don’t like what I said.

You guys will spend the next month trying to find exceptions to what I posted just so you can say you’re right, and I’m wrong. And in doing so, you’re missing the point.

The point is that there are rules that you should learn first, before you decide to discard them. WHY? Because they say something about human nature, and how we respond to images. And it you care about affecting others with your images, you should at least understand those rules and why they apply. If they don’t apply in South Africa, then fine. Don’t use them in South Africa. But don’t use that, as so many here constantly do, as an excuse not to learn anything in the first place. If you don’t want to learn, then don’t. But don’t discourage others from doing so, because by picking at the point I’m making, that’s what you’re doing.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 02:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 109 ]
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booksbydavid - 13 September 2012 09:14 AM

And as far as Evil’s image, the white background simply works for that image. I’m told all the time that an image should have a focus, something that captures the viewers eye. Well, Evil’s image does just that. That white background forces the viewer in no uncertain terms to look at that girl, to focus on that girl! Makes sense to me, but then I guess I’m just a *gasp* hobbiest..

Okay, let me make this really clear.

I NEVER SAID DON’T USE A FREAKIN’ WHITE BACKGROUND !!!!

I said start out with black while you are studying spotlights. Then, when you’re done, you can look into the effect of backgrounds. That’s what I said. Go back and read it. But you want to poke at what I say, so you re-word it so you can find a way to argue with it.

White backgrounds are wonderful, okay? Many uses. No question. I love them, when used correctly. But my recommendation is don’t try monkeying with too many things at once, and start learning slowly and simply.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 03:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 110 ]
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JoeMamma2000 - 13 September 2012 02:49 PM
booksbydavid - 13 September 2012 09:14 AM

And as far as Evil’s image, the white background simply works for that image. I’m told all the time that an image should have a focus, something that captures the viewers eye. Well, Evil’s image does just that. That white background forces the viewer in no uncertain terms to look at that girl, to focus on that girl! Makes sense to me, but then I guess I’m just a *gasp* hobbiest..

Okay, let me make this really clear.

I NEVER SAID DON’T USE A FREAKIN’ WHITE BACKGROUND !!!!

I said start out with black while you are studying spotlights. Then, when you’re done, you can look into the effect of backgrounds. That’s what I said. Go back and read it. But you want to poke at what I say, so you re-word it so you can find a way to argue with it.

White backgrounds are wonderful, okay? Many uses. No question. I love them, when used correctly. But my recommendation is don’t try monkeying with too many things at once, and start learning slowly and simply.

And I never said you never said don’t use a freakin’ white background!!!

Go back and read it!!! I didn’t quote you AT ALL. My entire post was talking about Evil’s render, for cryin’ out loud.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 03:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 111 ]
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JoeMamma2000 - 13 September 2012 02:24 PM
booksbydavid - 13 September 2012 09:14 AM

I’ve subscribed to both 3D World and 3D Artist for years, and while I realize that doesn’t make me a professional, it does allow me an insight into the lives, thought processes and workflow of MANY 3D professionals. The one thing I’ve learned is that there are NO hard and fast rules for creating art. Several years of artist interviews show that every artist approaches his/her craft differently. Sure some things just ARE like lights light things, and color colors things but the art is in how you use those ‘hard and fast’ rules.


And here’s why I love you guys so much…

I’ll spend many hours providing examples, renders, detailed explanations, reasoning, and the results of my experience and professional training, and in return you will dismiss it with nothing more than “no, you’re wrong”, and cite some magazines you’ve read.

Are you serious? You can’t even provide one shred of rational thought or discussion on any one of the 30 or 40 examples and (dare I say it) “rules” I listed. And I’m supposed to take you seriously, and treat you with respect? This is exactly why I get so frustrated with some of you guys, and criticize you. Unbelievable.

I’m not about to go and pull up references to particular interviews or articles I’ve read. My point is ‘professionals’ in magazines aimed at ‘professionals’ (well at least 3D world) say these things. So I am to dismiss every word I read any place else and only listen to you? I’m glad you pointed that out. That will save me a couple hundred dollars every year in magazine subscriptions.

And just for the record, you don’t criticize us, you make fun of us. There’s a difference. And while your insights and treatises on all things 3D show that you have some knowledge, the renders provided as examples don’t make you appear any more talented or accomplished than the rest of us.

I for one am still waiting to see your portfolio or any ‘real’ work done by you so that I can be suitably amazed. At least guys like Evil will show us his images and also his settings and screen caps and explain what he’s done. You just show us images that have every appearance of being slapped together just to throw at us.

Shouldn’t you be working on some big ‘professional’ project that you can’t tell any of us about instead of making fun of us ‘hobbiests’?

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Posted: 13 September 2012 03:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 112 ]
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JoeMamma2000 - 13 September 2012 02:28 PM
booksbydavid - 13 September 2012 09:39 AM

Just as an aside, what about savants. There are records of savants who just started creating amazing artwork or music with no prior instruction and in some cases no prior experience at all.

Okay, I’m not going to argue with this one, because with a little bit of thought you’ll realize that the example you’re giving has absolutely no relevance whatsoever. Savants play by the same musical rules as everyone else.

Yes, rules they never learned. Rules that were already there in their brains. You left out the bit where I said that those ‘rules’ you hold so dear appear to already be in our heads and that the learning is actually the reteaching of what we already knew.

You also left out the bit where I said, “. I won’t deny that knowledge is power and the more you know the better you can become as an artist, but knowledge of the ‘rules’ is not a prerequisite to being an artist of any sort.”

Joe, I said you were right, I’m just pointing out that you may be a bit to didactic and unrelenting as far as the ‘rules’ are concerned.

 

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Posted: 13 September 2012 03:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 113 ]
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Roygee - 13 September 2012 10:03 AM

Just in general - be wary of projecting a Euro-American centricity to all things artistic.  There are many, many other cultures in the world that view colour and symbols very differently to Euro-America.  In some countries white is the colour of mourning.  In Africa and South-Central America art is vibrant and can be seen as over-saturated to Euro-American eyes.  In English-centric countries, an owl is seen as representing wisdom: in Africa it is the harbinger of death.  And so on - just don’t get comfortable and assume that what you are used to, what your culture perceives as this or that, what emotions it evokes applies equally to all cultures.

Roygee, you’re right about this, and I do tend to think in Eurocentric terms when creating. It’s kinda hard to get away from it. You’re lucky I don’t throw Texas centric stuff at you. You’d all run for the hills.LOL

I will say that in recent years I’ve had the most enjoyment from movies (I’m talking CG movies) made in Europe, France mostly. The story telling as well as the color pallets used are refreshing and exciting. It pays to open your eyes and see the rest of the world. Thanks for the reminder.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 04:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 114 ]
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Jay_NOLA - 13 September 2012 02:13 PM

The blue and the orange coloration scheme is a big thing I see cropping up too much now a days and I can’t even watch certain movies & TV shows because of it

http://theabyssgazes.blogspot.com/2010/03/teal-and-orange-hollywood-please-stop.html

http://www.slashfilm.com/orangeblue-contrast-in-movie-posters/

http://www.cracked.com/article_18664_5-annoying-trends-that-make-every-movie-look-same.html

EXCELLENT !!! Jay gets the Carrara Forums award for the most intelligent and useful post of the year.

Very true. Though keep in mind, for those who’d use the overuse/misuse of a “rule” as an excuse to never use the “rule” or dismiss it totally, the effect on viewers still applies. It’s just up to the artist to decide how to best use it, if at all.

Thanks, Jay. Good, insightful stuff.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 05:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 115 ]
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By the way, the reason I’m so thrilled with Jay’s post is this..

It highlights that there are two ways you can participate in online public training forums. You can either focus on getting upset and offended, and attacking people and their motives with useless side issues and diversionary tactics, or you can raise pertinent issues and discuss those issues like an adult.

Jay furthered the discussion by raising an issue that is VERY pertinent to professionals in the industry (and a source of much discussion and joking), and highlights two important points:

1. There are rules, based on how viewers perceive things, and those perceptions are based on human nature.

2. It’s up to the artist to decide how and whether to take advantage of those perceptions.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 05:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 116 ]
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edited to remove fuel.

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I find it somewhat liberating not to be encumbered by accuracy.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 05:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 117 ]
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Remember everybody, don’t be like me, and get overly emotional, and provide examples of how the rules can be bent.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 05:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 118 ]
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BTW, here’s a sinister example of underlighting, which we all know the rule states that it’s sinister. Also, never use Carrara fire because it sucks. That’s another rule.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 05:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 119 ]
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Really, you guys should read the Cracked article that Jay posted a link to. It’s really good, and it highlights a lot of really good effects that are used, but unfortunately have become overused.

Doesn’t mean the effects are bad, because originally they worked really, really well. Some of them incredibly well. But the guys who made them work well did it for a specific reason, with a specific purpose. Those who jumped on the bandwagon recognized how well they worked, and overused and misused them. But they are all based on how viewers react. 

It’s the same thing that happens in just about every industry. Fashion is a great example. Trends come, and trends go, and by the time they go you’ve just about had your fill of that trend. Same with music, or any other artform. But it’s all an attempt to find out how viewers respond and take advantage of that.

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Posted: 13 September 2012 05:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 120 ]
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evilproducer - 13 September 2012 05:47 PM

BTW, here’s a sinister example of underlighting, which we all know the rule states that it’s sinister. Also, never use Carrara fire because it sucks. That’s another rule.

Sorry, Evil. I guess I gave you a lot of work to do. You’d better get busy, now you’ve got about 39 other examples to find exceptions to.

Here, let me help…

There’s a small tribe in the mountains of Indonesia that uses a rare form of acacia wood to light their bonfires. And this particular type of wood actually burns with the same color spectrum as a GE Cool White CFL bulb, which is a slightly bluish tinge.

So really, if you show them my image, they’d feel bad and confused, because they expect bonfires to emit blue light.

Okay, now you’ve only got 38 left. Divide between you, Roy, and Dave, and you can knock it out in no time.

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