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Any PA’s Interested In Developing 3D Print Friendly D|S Content? - Provided DAZ Says It Is Allowed
Posted: 16 December 2012 01:20 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Provided DAZ says 3D printing of D|S models is allowed, would any PA’s be interested in producing 3D print “friendly” content?

I know there is a concern about intellectual property being stolen from a 3D print format file, but I as someone who has worked with these files intimately, I can attest that it would take far less time to develop one’s own content than it would to extract usable data from a .STL file.  In fact, I believe it would be virtually impossible to extract usable data from a composite character model in .STL format.

Due to my knowledge and experience with 3D printing, I can provide information and guidance in what a 3D print friendly file would need.

There is a HUGE and rapidly growing movement, people are buying their own 3D printers for under $800!  There is and will be a tremendous market for people to use 3D software to make 3D printable characters.  I believe that any PA’s and, for that matter, DAZ could expand their market tremendously by offering a 3D print friendly content.

Of course, this would all hinge on DAZ’s “OK” first, but since people can already print their renders on paper (or if they don’t have a printer, they can print their JPG file at Staples or some similar firm), there really should be no distinction regarding the form of output - provided that everyone’s intellectual property is protected.

So, if DAZ says “OK”, I am willing to provide guidance to any developer/artist who wants to develop 3D print friendly content.

Any thoughts?

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Posted: 22 December 2012 10:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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People are now getting 3d printers from Kickstarter for about $250.

I would think the workflow would be to put a model into .obj format and then convert to .stl, but haven’t tried it.

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Posted: 22 December 2012 12:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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athenenoctua - 22 December 2012 10:42 AM

People are now getting 3d printers from Kickstarter for about $250.

I would think the workflow would be to put a model into .obj format and then convert to .stl, but haven’t tried it.

The $250 printers are usually kits that you have to assemble.  Also, the lower costing devices have a small build area.  The $500 to $800 units are fully assembled, “pull it outta the box, set it up and go” type devices.

The workflow is exactly what you posted, but the resulting .stl will have errors.  And error correcting software will make errors during the correction process.  I have almost 2 years of experience with this - I do it on a daily basis at work - so it isn’t that easy to make an error-free .stl file from a D|S model.  Error-free being the main point.

 

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Posted: 25 December 2012 09:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I don’t have a whole lot experience with 3d printing and I’m not a PA (yet), but I would still like to give it a try.

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Posted: 26 December 2012 10:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Well, it looks like some legalities have to be worked out first.  DAZ and the PAs have to evaluate the process and be sure that their intellectual property is protected.

Once they come to a consensus and issue a statement that it is allowed, the project can move forward.

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Posted: 27 December 2012 10:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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KorvisBlack - 22 December 2012 12:33 PM
athenenoctua - 22 December 2012 10:42 AM

People are now getting 3d printers from Kickstarter for about $250.

I would think the workflow would be to put a model into .obj format and then convert to .stl, but haven’t tried it.

The $250 printers are usually kits that you have to assemble.  Also, the lower costing devices have a small build area.  The $500 to $800 units are fully assembled, “pull it outta the box, set it up and go” type devices.

The workflow is exactly what you posted, but the resulting .stl will have errors.  And error correcting software will make errors during the correction process.  I have almost 2 years of experience with this - I do it on a daily basis at work - so it isn’t that easy to make an error-free .stl file from a D|S model.  Error-free being the main point.

Thank you so much for this information!  I’ve been discussing doing this with a partner/client, and the information you have provided will help make some decisions.

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Posted: 18 January 2013 12:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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3D Systems has just announced their Cube X 3D printer.  The 3 head version is available for under $4000 (sounds like a lot, but actually quite cheap as far as 3D printers are concerned) and is capable in printing in multiple colors and materials.  Layers are as thin as 125 microns and the device can print parts as large as a basketball.  This printer would not be the “BEST” choice for making highly detailed 3D models, but it would be a “GOOD” choice for the price.

Materials are relatively cheap, operation is extremely simple and larger models would look quite impressive.

All you would need to do is ensure that the .STL file is error free - which is a requirement for any 3D printed model.

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Posted: 25 January 2013 04:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I built my own 3D printer and used it to print some sculptures. It’s not easy but it is possible. Nails, hair, eyes and mouth contents will all cause problems and need some form of editing. I use Blender to edit the STL files, looking for non-manifold areas in the mesh and cleaning them up. There is a lot to learn - calibration, temperature control, heated chambers and lots of patience are all important, but the results can be amazing.

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Posted: 25 January 2013 05:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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The necessity of manifold meshing pretty much eliminates all of my clothing content, as that’s exactly what you don’t do when making clothes for DS figures.  I’d have to be very sure there was a market before I’d think about the amount of work it would take to make manifold clothing meshes at the detail level required.  At that point you’re talking about zero overlap between this and the regular DS user market.

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Posted: 11 August 2013 07:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I was just thinking of this very idea and realized most of the manifold issues can be avoided using Genesis.  You don’t create clothing and such as separate props, but rather as another morph.  Hand props would still be an issue to check, but if DAZ could find a way to “weld” the mesh of Genesis and Props (and add a Scale feature and Manifold/Collision checking to the mix) I don’t see why Studio couldn’t export it as an STL or OBJ to Shapeways or your personal printer.  But again, DAZ and the PA’s would need to allow it (I just checked the current License and we are allowed to ask them for permission to do this, but it is limited in many ways).

Personally I think the idea rocks as there is a huge untapped market in the gaming community.  And if Daz does try to develop this, I think there’s enough peeps who would front the money for it on Kickstarter.  I personally would love to be able to create 28mm character figures for gaming with DAZ.  Hope they’re listening!

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