Move vertices along edges?

 Son of Belmont Son of Belmont Posts: 0
edited December 1969 in Hexagon Discussion

Hi
Is there a way in Hexagon to move individual vertices along an edge? similar to the way move edges along edges works?

Comments

  • PendraiaPendraia Posts: 2,522
    edited December 1969

    Hi
    Is there a way in Hexagon to move individual vertices along an edge? similar to the way move edges along edges works?
    Not totally sure what you are after...do you mean shifting a vertice along a single axis. If so you can use the universal manipulator to do it. You select the vertice icon and then use the universal manipulator to move it along the desired axis.

  •  Son of Belmont Son of Belmont Posts: 0
    edited November 2012

    Thats not really what I meant
    If you go to tesselation by slice the way the little marker moves along edges is pretty much how I'd like to be able to move vertices

    Post edited by Son of Belmont on
  • GeddGedd Posts: 2,447
    edited November 2012

    Moving vertices along an edge is a feature of many 3D modeling packages. I don't believe it can be done in Hexagon. What you can do iirc is to cut and restitch the area or move an edge along a surface. Between the two of these you should be able to achieve what you want.

    Post edited by Gedd on
  • dmrick44dmrick44 Posts: 0
    edited November 2012

    There is one simple way that I know of... I verified this by creating a cone. Then I went into the Lines tab and clicked the Insert point icon. I then inserted a point on one of the line segments that was connecting the base to the tip of the cone. This now gives us a point on a line to experiment with. Next, switch to the Select Edges tool. Click on the Custom Plane Enabled button and then click on the line just above or below the new point. The new working axis is now in line with the line that has the point. Rotate your view about until you have the line somewhat perpendicular to you. Switch to the Point Select tool and move the point up and down the line. Hope that helps.

    Post edited by dmrick44 on
  • ausairausair Posts: 0
    edited November 2012

    There is a slide edge tool which will move two or more vertices at once. (Shift + S)

    You can also orientate the workplane to a adjacent face then slide the vertices.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzGZOldRPZg

    Post edited by ausair on
  • PendraiaPendraia Posts: 2,522
    edited December 1969

    Gedd said:
    Moving vertices along an edge is a feature of many 3D modeling packages. I don't believe it can be done in Hexagon. What you can do iirc is to cut and restitch the area or move an edge along a surface. Between the two of these you should be able to achieve what you want.
    ive only used hex and zbrush probably why I've not come across it previously.

    Great ideas , ill have to give them a try!

  • GeddGedd Posts: 2,447
    edited December 1969

    Good feedback on alternatives, they are a bit clumsy but might help in some situations. A true slide vertice allows one to cleanup/tweek topo quickly when it isn't flowing quite how one would like, which I believe is the main purpose.

  • PendraiaPendraia Posts: 2,522
    edited December 1969

    Gedd said:
    Good feedback on alternatives, they are a bit clumsy but might help in some situations. A true slide vertice allows one to cleanup/tweek topo quickly when it isn't flowing quite how one would like, which I believe is the main purpose.
    I'm not an expert like you guys...still very much an intermediate type level but if cleaning up the mesh when it's distorted is the aim....I've used the soften tool under uv and paint to get good results when tidying up an autofitted mesh. You have to be careful with it but applying it sparingly and stroking up and down the edges seems to straighten them up.

  • afreaginnameafreaginname Posts: 0
    edited November 2012

    There was a long thread that dealt with exactly this problem in quite a bit of detail awhile ago, and I've been searching high and low for it...

    ...and I FINALLY found it!!

    This'll keep you busy for awhile... :)

    http://www.daz3d.com/forums/discussion/5267/

    There's no direct way of accomplishing this, but I posted a mathematical solution there towards the beginning, and Johnnybevo posted another (perhaps preferable) way of doing it towards the end of the thread. He shows how he did it in a video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzGZOldRPZg

    ADD:

    Oops..I see Ausair beat me to listing Johnnybevo's video.

    Oh well, better mentioned twice than not at all! :)

    Post edited by afreaginname on
  • RedSquareRedSquare Posts: 0
    edited November 2012

    I haven't seen that video yet nor do I remember the thread. However if the OP is using the latest version, couldn't he do exactly what he gave as an example and create and move a tessellation along an edge x amount. Then dissolve {back space} it WITHOUT removing the verts {ie none} which is an option if I remember correctly. This would then leave nicely aligned verts. ? or, am I having a silly 5 minutes. :down:

    Edit: Thus. :cheese:

    verts_2.jpg
    1018 x 762 - 190K
    Post edited by RedSquare on
  • RedSquareRedSquare Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Yet another one......

    verts_3.jpg
    1018 x 766 - 218K
  • RedSquareRedSquare Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    and thus: Sort of random but all the same amount. But why would you want to do it ? :-S

    verts_4.jpg
    1024 x 764 - 242K
  • RoygeeRoygee Posts: 1,885
    edited December 1969

    Very simple method is to insert a new edge where you want it, connect it to another vert and dissolve the unneeded edge.:)

  • dmrick44dmrick44 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Why is it that everyone seems to be going to so much trouble just to slide a point along an edge? I can only guess that if they are going to move a point to a new position, they must know where they want it. If that's true why not just use the Insert Points tool to add a point in the desired place and then remove the original point using the backspace key? The tool will add points to lines or edges.

  • GeddGedd Posts: 2,447
    edited November 2012

    The reason for moving a vert is not about morphing a mesh or moving a lone point. Moving a vert moves the angle of the line of a poly specifically along a given edge. This allows for instance if the mesh *bends* in that area it will bend depending on the angle of said line/layout of polys. This is a big part of what people are referring to when they are commenting on the topology, not the number of polys so much but the direction of lines so that if/when the mesh twists, bends, etc.. during animation or movement it does so cleanly. Hopefully this clears some of this up. Having said that, Roygee gave the best/simplest answer from what I can see. Adding a new line and dissolving the unneeded would do exactly what one wants without a lot of extra steps. A little more then just sliding the vert but not enough to be a bother :)

    There is even a video tutorial on exactly the method Roygee describes but I don't remember where I saw it exactly. Possibly in one of Fugazi's tutorials.

    Btw RedSquare, there are reasons for creating (and even extruding) verts but that is a different topic ;)

    @Pen Those are good techniques for doing quick adjustments and might actually accomplish what someone needs when thinking of moving verts around, but the general idea of moving verts is to adjust the base mesh usually during final creation process before distributing/finalizing it. The techniques you are referring to are for adjusting a mesh after the fact for a specific situation. I hope that makes sense.

    Of course I could be totally off base and misunderstood the purpose for the original question ;p

    Post edited by Gedd on
  • RedSquareRedSquare Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    @ Gedd.

    Ah! Morphs etc clothing etc. Not my scene so never used. However I do use the technique when necessary though rarely.

  • GeddGedd Posts: 2,447
    edited November 2012

    Pendraia said:
    ... but if cleaning up the mesh when it's distorted is the aim....I've used the soften tool under uv and paint to get good results when tidying up an autofitted mesh. You have to be careful with it but applying it sparingly and stroking up and down the edges seems to straighten them up.

    Sorry Pen, I misread this for some reason. I was thinking of the D-Former. Yes the soften tool is used at the same time as moving verts around, just for a different purpose. Soften is a great tool for cleaning up distortions.

    I'm still learning also, it's nice to be in a community where we can share ideas and techniques :)

    Post edited by Gedd on
  • AscaniaAscania Posts: 0
    edited November 2012

    Select the edge, duplicate it, subdivide it a dozen times.
    Now go back to your original mesh, select the vertex and move it around while holding SHIFT.

    http://youtu.be/zvd6CBkZIBs

    Post edited by Ascania on
  • PendraiaPendraia Posts: 2,522
    edited December 1969

    Gedd said:
    The reason for moving a vert is not about morphing a mesh or moving a lone point. Moving a vert moves the angle of the line of a poly specifically along a given edge. This allows for instance if the mesh *bends* in that area it will bend depending on the angle of said line/layout of polys. This is a big part of what people are referring to when they are commenting on the topology, not the number of polys so much but the direction of lines so that if/when the mesh twists, bends, etc.. during animation or movement it does so cleanly. Hopefully this clears some of this up. Having said that, Roygee gave the best/simplest answer from what I can see. Adding a new line and dissolving the unneeded would do exactly what one wants without a lot of extra steps. A little more then just sliding the vert but not enough to be a bother :)Thanks for the great explanation! : )

    Gedd said:
    ... but if cleaning up the mesh when it's distorted is the aim....I've used the soften tool under uv and paint to get good results when tidying up an autofitted mesh. You have to be careful with it but applying it sparingly and stroking up and down the edges seems to straighten them up.

    Sorry Pen, I misread this for some reason. I was thinking of the D-Former. Yes the soften tool is used at the same time as moving verts around, just for a different purpose. Soften is a great tool for cleaning up distortions.

    I'm still learning also, it's nice to be in a community where we can share ideas and techniques :)


    Yes it is great to have such a fantastic community that is willing to share...no need to apologise. It's easy to misread at times...; )

    A lot of what I've learnt has been through trial and error so I like to read these threads and learn more about the logic/theory behind the practice and what works best.

    Cheers

    Pen

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