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Warning to live in 1950’s not for wimps
Posted: 25 October 2012 08:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Today we take telephone every were, back then one is tied to telephone by a ten foot cord, when my sister talked on the phone at home I listen in on the other house phone and she did not know that. The fun part going to school next day tell others about her boy friend when she get home that she chased me around the house wanting pound living crap out me because I teld about her boy friend. It. My father made a television set from kit from Radio Shack and we used for many years after that, he was one make his own gasets for the engine of family car. Big thing in record instudy was 45 rpm records back the. After WWII ended he work with microwaves he thought useing it to cook food back then, I rember going thru his pocket change those silver dimes, quarters, and half dollars back I kept a small part of them they would with hundreds of dollars now. The silver dollar my uncle gave me back then I still have now worth hundred dollars now. I love pizzas my father bring home once a month for the family that guy who made them came Naples Itlay I never find place that ever make like again

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Posted: 25 October 2012 09:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Besides racism, sexism, anti-commununism, there was the rising corporatocracy and “Madison Avenue” pushing the good life of consumerism and conformity. White male megalomania was rampant - Bing Crosby was going strong and Arthur Godfrey had two or three TV shows going. Happy Days? It was a relief when the 60s came.

There were good things too, but I love grumbling about the 50s. Thanks, Greg. grin

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Posted: 25 October 2012 10:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Oh dear, I also ran into some homosexual warning commercials XD
“Look out when he’s too friendly, he might be homosexual!”

I always knew that being friendly was something to be suspicious about!
ROFL

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Posted: 25 October 2012 12:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Ah, yes, the marvelous 50’s. Let’s not forget that the Nevada test site fallout possibly killed John Wayne. Of the 220 cast and crew of the Howard Hughes epic “The Conqueror” filmed in Utah, no less than 91 developed some form of cancer. For many, the 50’s were a time of suffering and struggle to end that suffering. I have personal stories to tell about the Civil Rights Movement, even though I was just a kid at the time. But, Hey! If it wasn’t for the 50’s we wouldn’t have Rock & Roll! grin

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Posted: 25 October 2012 01:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Graduating high school in ‘59, I remember a lot of things.  But, the biggest danger then was as it still is, getting on the highway and meeting a drunk behind the wheel.  No less fatal then than now.

Standing across the street in my senior year, watching the people going into the gym for the prom, thinking I was glad I wasn’t one of them. 

The draft, and I enlisted in the Navy three days before I was drafted. 

A-bomb drills, now we know they would have done exactly squat, big deal.  Joe McCarthy and his panic approach, the black lists, almost everything coming out of congress then was the panic approach, none justified, which we now know.

Real slate blackboards, standing by the teacher with a wet sponge, real sponge, not celulose. wet the board, then she’d write on the wet board so it wouldn’t rub off, how many remember that?  One room schools, I went to one fourth through eighth grade.

I survived.

D.

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Posted: 25 October 2012 03:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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How different it was this side of the pond.  After years of rationing,  rationing was taken off the final products in 1953.  Oh the joy of being taken down to the sweet shop by my big brother, and being able to choose my own sweets without Mum having to hand over a precious ration coupon.

And we had fun places to play, OK the grown ups called them bomb sites and said we should stay off them, but all the rubble was intriguing to kids, as were the municipal bomb shelters when people had broken the door locks, scary places to play hide and seek in, but kids like scary sometimes.

very few cars around, as petrol still was in quite short supply.

I vaguely remember the storm of 1953, when there was the highest spring tide coupled with a storm surge from the North Sea. (We lived in SE England then, not far from the river estuary) People rowing boats up the streets from the river, and we couldn’t go to school as it was flooded. But we did get to see the queen, as she came to visit, see how bad it was. I do remember seeing the queen, and being given a little flag to wave,

And then of course there was the Coronation.  Only one or 2 people in our road had TV sets, so imagine 20 or 30 people in one small front room, watching a little flickering B&W TV.. And of course, being the UK, it was raining, so the street Party after had to be held in the Corinthian hall instead.

Mostly though it was a much more laid back way of life then, and everyone was just happy the war was over, and life was getting back to normal.

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Posted: 25 October 2012 03:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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LeatherGryphon - 25 October 2012 06:52 AM

Ah the 50’s (*nostalgic sigh*)

I was at my wonderful boyness best between 8 and 12.  Small town upstate NY.  Safely wandered the streets at night.  Nobody locked their doors (the dogs were cheaply paid alarms).  Firecrackers and cow poop,... great fun!  Wandered alone up the old stone quarry gathering polywogs and looking for fossils.  Today the mothers would have panic attacks at the potential danger and you couldn’t do it anyway because the land owners would most strongly object because they don’t have insurance covering you.  I don’t think the modern kids in this town even know that there is an old stone quarry still there starting just behind old Mrs. *********‘s house on Langdon St.

We weren’t rich.  My dad owned a small gas station and gas sold for around 30 cents per gallon, but we had new kitchen appliances, a new car every 4 or 5 years, and trips to Florida a few times.  We could afford lobster dinners and the lobsters were HUGE back then, available even in small country taverns.

Kids played outside and we waited for the school bus outside in -40F temperatures.  Nobody had to carry school books so no kid had a backback.  Of course no kid had anything on them that was worth stealing, no cell phone or e-game.  Although you could get your lunch money (a quarter) stolen by the bully but all you had to do was kick him in the shins once and he left you alone.  No kid wore designer clothes.

However, I do not miss the greasy goop you were expected to slick down your hair with each morning.  Brylcreem!  Yuk! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brylcreem

I’m afraid to ask what part of a Bryl creature you get the “creem” from. 8-o

In an interesting aside from what you’ve posted. Because of the computers and high speed internet of the 21 century. After over 25 years of living in the big cities because that’s where the computer programming jobs are, I now work for a company that let’s me write code 100% from home.

So my husband and I find our dream home in a small city in Nevada called Yerington, with a population of a little over 3000, and move away from the lights, gangs, sirens, and helicopter lights from above, of Las Vegas, NV.

The town I’ve just moved to is like the best of the 50’s and 60’s with the best of the 21st century.

The house is two stories and 2800 sq ft of living space, on an acre of land, with another acre next door of unimproved land, just outside of the town proper. Big enough for us and my daughter and two grandchildren, and fruit trees, garden, yard, cars (which includes a 1964 Corvair and a 1966 Chevy pickup).... Don’t need to lock our doors; not one bit of graffiti on any of the buildings or fences.. (and no sign of painted over graffiti). Personally ran businesses. (OK, it is Nevada and there is a small Casino in town)... Not one signal light in a 50 mile radius… Just two stop signs down main street, and couple more stop signs around the side streets.  Basically, I’ve stepped thru a time machine and was able to take the technology with me…..

BEST OF BOTH WORLDS!

 

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Posted: 25 October 2012 03:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Seat belts? What are those?

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Posted: 25 October 2012 03:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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JOdel - 25 October 2012 03:38 PM

Seat belts? What are those?

Hee, Hee….. My 1964 Corvair doesn’t have seat belts, they were optional.

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Posted: 25 October 2012 04:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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chohole - 25 October 2012 03:17 PM

How different it was this side of the pond.  After years of rationing,  rationing was taken off the final products in 1953.  Oh the joy of being taken down to the sweet shop by my big brother, and being able to choose my own sweets without Mum having to hand over a precious ration coupon.

And we had fun places to play, OK the grown ups called them bomb sites and said we should stay off them, but all the rubble was intriguing to kids, as were the municipal bomb shelters when people had broken the door locks, scary places to play hide and seek in, but kids like scary sometimes.

very few cars around, as petrol still was in quite short supply.

I vaguely remember the storm of 1953, when there was the highest spring tide coupled with a storm surge from the North Sea. (We lived in SE England then, not far from the river estuary) People rowing boats up the streets from the river, and we couldn’t go to school as it was flooded. But we did get to see the queen, as she came to visit, see how bad it was. I do remember seeing the queen, and being given a little flag to wave,

And then of course there was the Coronation.  Only one or 2 people in our road had TV sets, so imagine 20 or 30 people in one small front room, watching a little flickering B&W TV.. And of course, being the UK, it was raining, so the street Party after had to be held in the Corinthian hall instead.

Mostly though it was a much more laid back way of life then, and everyone was just happy the war was over, and life was getting back to normal.

That was very interesting Chohole.

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Posted: 25 October 2012 04:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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The 50’s…. a bit before my time…

But…

I get the supreme privilege of living with someone who was “young” in the 50’s (She’s in her 80’s now.) Personally, I think that generation is a little bit nuts!! LOL. Let me share a few things about how I feel generations have shaped differing opinions from a huge generationally gapped point of view… lol

OK…first time this thought occurred to be was one day when she and I were looking out at the front yard. It was spring, dandelions were sprouting all over the place… and she says, ” Oh! The dandelions are just dreadful! I wish they never had banned DDT! That stuff actually worked. You didn’t have all this mess all over your yard. I’ll tell you, back then, you got your money’s worth when you bought something. Things did what they were supposed to do!”

ohh  *blink* big surprise

I, of course, could NOT even think of a response…but in my mind, I was thinking, Did you see the limbless children that were born because of that stuff?


Then, on another occasion, she had purchased some rat poison ( to get rid of mice, I presume) and she is instructing my boyfriend to “sprinkle it on the shelves in the fruit cellar”

OK… there were like these HUGE red warnings on the box telling NOT to do that and to not have it around food and stuff, so my b/f was gently trying to explain to her that he couldn’t do that…. she was sooo freaking MAD! She insisted she had been doing it this way for years!!

ohh  *blink* big surprise


I’m surprised anyone survived that era now…lol

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Posted: 25 October 2012 04:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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I thought DDT was a problem largely because it was affecting wildlife - Silent Spring and so on - while the missing or malformed limbs were Thalidomide.

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Posted: 25 October 2012 04:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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I had always heard DDT was a problem… I don’t know about Thalidomide. Here is the google scholar link on the topic:

http://scholar.google.ca/scholar?q=DDT+and+birth+defects&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ei=uL6JUOmLNMiU0QGnqYHoBA&ved=0CB4QgQMwAA

LOL… this was before my time. I don’t have actual “memories” I just vaguely remember a few documentaries in school… I can’t actually quote anyone or anything…

but, yeah…just for the record…

I think if we survive our chemical experimentation on this planet…it will be a true miracle, indeed.

Which brings me back around to my original point…

Her generation: absolutely and without fear or trepidation, embraced all kinds of new chemical solutions.
My generation: encouraged to use “natural” and “green” solutions.

....very very different

edited: more on this thought…

I suppose our grandchildren will hate us for the “genetic pollution” that is happening in my generation.

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Posted: 25 October 2012 06:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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“Her generation: absolutely and without fear or trepidation, embraced all kinds of new chemical solutions.”

To the point that you will look near and far to find someone born post WWII who was breast fed. That was just so *primitive*, after all. Baby formula is so much more “scientific”.

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Posted: 25 October 2012 07:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Wow…nobody came back? Weirdness abounds here lately…lol

Anyway…yeah, Jodel, until about the 70’s or so… I nursed mine for 13 months… but that was the 90’s… And you know…it was that generation (those who are 80ish now) that really had an issue with my breastfeeding..lol See, I think my generation is so completely differently minded than that one…it’s really hard sometimes to even just chat…but I do try. wink

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