dsb-type files

hiker_1hiker_1 Posts: 0
edited December 1969 in Daz Studio Discussion

where do these files go?

they are mat files that came with a product and the vendor suggests dropping them into the "DAZ4Materials" directory, but i see no such directory, nor can I find any other "dsb" type files... lots of "dsa" files, but no "dsb" ones....

anybody know where they go??

TIA

:8

Comments

  • JimmyC_2009JimmyC_2009 Posts: 8,353
    edited December 1969

    What version of DS4 are you using? Is you main content installed to the My Library folder?

    If so, then you can create a new folder inside the My Library folder called Materials, and drop them in there. As long as DS file types are in a listed DAZ Studio Formats folder, they will appear inside DS4P.

    Try that and see if it helps.

  • FixmypcmikeFixmypcmike Posts: 12,293
    edited December 1969

    .dsb are just binary versions of .dsa (may or may not be encrypted), and work the same way.

  • hiker_1hiker_1 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    that solved it Jimmy! thanks....

    and thank you also mike for the info... i could not find any dsb files to give me a clue....

    :8

  • gabugabu Posts: 262
    edited December 1969

    I can't get the .dsb files to show up in the content pane of Studio 4.5.

    I can get them to work by using the merge function so they are executable by Studio 4.5.

    They are dated feb 2008.

    Is there anything I can do to get them to be listed in the content pane?

    And is there any way of unzipping them and altering them as I want to change the location of some of the jpg files that they are calling.

  • JimmyC_2009JimmyC_2009 Posts: 8,353
    edited December 1969

    luxgabu said:
    I can't get the .dsb files to show up in the content pane of Studio 4.5.

    I can get them to work by using the merge function so they are executable by Studio 4.5.

    They are dated feb 2008.

    Is there anything I can do to get them to be listed in the content pane?

    And is there any way of unzipping them and altering them as I want to change the location of some of the jpg files that they are calling.

    Where do you have the files stored? If they are in a DAZ Studio Formats folder, then they should be there in the Content Library under whatever folder you put them in, Scripts usually.

    Did you look at this post?

    What version of DS4 are you using? Is you main content installed to the My Library folder?

    If so, then you can create a new folder inside the My Library folder called Materials, and drop them in there. As long as DS file types are in a listed DAZ Studio Formats folder, they will appear inside DS4P.

    Try that and see if it helps.

    The Script IDE pane will open and display DSB files, but I'm not sure if it comes with the main installer. I also downloaded the SDK (Script Development Kit) which is also free, and that may be where I got it. It should appear in Window > Tabs > Script IDE.

  • gabugabu Posts: 262
    edited December 1969

    the scriptIDE pane is there with the main installer for 4.5.1.6 anyway and I used it to convert the dsb format to dsa

    the file structure I am using is:

    E:\user\daz\content\runtime\libraries\materials\snakequeen

    but neither the dsa nor dsb files show up in the content pane for that directory

    HOWEVER

    if I move the dsb/dsa files to a materials subdirectory within my library as in your quoted text everything shows up and works

    But why do these files only get recognised within the my library file structure?

  • JimmyC_2009JimmyC_2009 Posts: 8,353
    edited December 1969

    DS file types will NOT appear inside a Poser runtime folder.

    In your case

    E:\user\daz\content\runtime\libraries\materials\snakequeen
    the Content folder is being used as a My Library folder, so any folder inside content will be a DS folder except for 'runtime', which will only display CR2, PZ2, PP2 etc, and these will be under Poser Formats in the Content Library.

  • PeteHPeteH Posts: 9
    edited December 1969

    The Script IDE does edit the .dsb files, but it is not complex. Is there an editor that will open and do a "find / replace" on multiple files?

    I use Editpad Pro for this type of work, but it doesn't have a plug-in to open the files as text, anyone know of one?

  • Richard HaseltineRichard Haseltine Posts: 19,934
    edited December 1969

    .dsb files a compressed - extract using an archive tool and then edit as normal. You don't have to recompress them if you don't want to.

  • JimmyC_2009JimmyC_2009 Posts: 8,353
    edited December 1969

    I thought DSB was a Binary format, not like a compressed DUF file?

  • PeteHPeteH Posts: 9
    edited December 1969

    .dsb files a compressed - extract using an archive tool and then edit as normal. You don't have to recompress them if you don't want to.

    I've tried 7Zip, WinRAR and PKZIP - all state file is corrupt - which makes me believe that they are NOT standard compressed files. If DAZ has a proprietary compression tool, then maybe!

    I'm still in favour of it being a compiled script

  • Richard HaseltineRichard Haseltine Posts: 19,934
    edited December 1969

    From DS3 or later .dsb is just compressed. In DS2 or earlier it may be compressed, or it may be encrypted too.

  • Richard HaseltineRichard Haseltine Posts: 19,934
    edited December 1969

    PeteHol said:
    .dsb files a compressed - extract using an archive tool and then edit as normal. You don't have to recompress them if you don't want to.

    I've tried 7Zip, WinRAR and PKZIP - all state file is corrupt - which makes me believe that they are NOT standard compressed files. If DAZ has a proprietary compression tool, then maybe!

    I'm still in favour of it being a compiled script

    If you look at the file in the DS Content Library pane you will get the version in the tool tip, or in the Info tab. As I said above, if it's from DS3 or later it is just compressed - and usually unzips; if it's from DS2 or earlier it may be encrypted in which case there's nothing to be done.

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