My digital comic book composed of DAZ products!

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Comments

  • MADMANMIKEMADMANMIKE Posts: 379
    edited December 1969

    A little post work; because the image was rendered without a mask, the outline is a bit screwed up around the hair, but this is part 2 page 32 from your render and then run through my filters in Photoshop CS2..

    It took all of five minutes to make this change to the style I use..

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  • galactica1981galactica1981 Posts: 752
    edited December 1969

    Well, I don't have Photoshop, though I do have Gimp. I'll have to try experimenting with it, though I haven't found it to be all that user friendly so far.

  • GiGi_7GiGi_7 Posts: 777
    edited December 1969

    CNSamson said:

    Here some of my comics, I drew many years ago, at a time when I had no computer, so I did everything in hand (and I'm left handed).
    Looks pretty cool! But too bad Google Translate doesn't work on images, yet. :)

    Unfortunately, the letters were also handmade.
    at the time I wrote straight into balloons.
    I just scan these pages today, and used image editor now to redimenssionar the ideal size accepted by daz forum.
    unfortunately

    Brazilian Portuguese to Spanish is more easy :). I enjoy this page from your comic.

  • RorrKonnRorrKonn Posts: 240
    edited December 1969

    not saying what any one should or should not do.
    not giving any kind of advise.
    just giving out some info.

    adobe now has creative cloud deals.
    affordable monthly deals.

    there is topazlabs.
    there is filter forge.

    if I was going for realism I would ask the the ones that make scfi movies and scfi TV like the shows on syfy.
    what render engines are the best for space & scfi.
    Lightwave does a lot of scfi and some of the syfy shows used Lightwave.

    if I was converting 3D in to 2D comics.
    I would use filters .topaz are my fav so far.

    some high end app's & zBrush have some killer shaders.

    DAZ Studio does have GoZ for zBrush
    zBrush has a lot to offer for a lot of different reasons.

  • galactica1981galactica1981 Posts: 752
    edited December 1969

    I just looked up Lightwave and it costs $1500! Wow...

  • RorrKonnRorrKonn Posts: 240
    edited December 1969

    check out maxon C4D or autodesk Max then Lightwave price won't seem that bad.
    Blenders free.
    DAZ has Carrara http://www.daz3d.com/software/carrara
    you could just ask what are some rendering tricks to get that sci fi look with any render engine.
    I like DAZ Studio render engine set on 4.

    one of the biggest CGI comics.
    so ya get what ya competing against.
    http://www.experienceanomaly.com/

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heSn6iVB__M
    not saying I would or you should make a comic this way
    but ya get how they made there comic.

  • daveleitz68daveleitz68 Posts: 0
    edited April 2013

    RorrKonn said:

    one of the biggest CGI comics.
    so ya get what ya competing against.
    http://www.experienceanomaly.com/

    Now that's some great artwork. Seems like they get some inspiration from the late John Berkey, among others. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Berkey

    Post edited by daveleitz68 on
  • Orphanslayer69Orphanslayer69 Posts: 34
    edited December 1969

    Whoa. Anybody who doesn't check out experienceanomaly is doing themselves a disservice.

  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 884
    edited December 1969

    gilikshe said:
    CNSamson said:

    Here some of my comics, I drew many years ago, at a time when I had no computer, so I did everything in hand (and I'm left handed).
    Looks pretty cool! But too bad Google Translate doesn't work on images, yet. :)

    Unfortunately, the letters were also handmade.
    at the time I wrote straight into balloons.
    I just scan these pages today, and used image editor now to redimenssionar the ideal size accepted by daz forum.
    unfortunately

    Brazilian Portuguese to Spanish is more easy :). I enjoy this page from your comic.

    Hmm!!Thank you.
    Nowadays, when someone asks me a job in style handmade I only use "Akvis Sketch", it's easy, it's fast!
    akvis sketch as it is handmade, I just need to have the rendered image.
    see in the image below:

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  • Proxima ShiningProxima Shining Posts: 1,001
    edited December 1969

    WOW!!!!! This Anomaly is, well, anomalous! I am speechless... :bug: :wow:

  • zigraphixzigraphix Posts: 2,768
    edited December 1969

    That's interesting, but I have no idea what you mean by a faux ink technique. Can you elaborate a little more on that?

    Sure. I opened your third image in GIMP and spent five minutes playing around with filters. My take on your image is by no means what I would do personally. I could spend an hour or two fiddling with settings to get it just right. I wanted to give an idea of what could be possible. You can play around with settings for one image and then batch process the rest with those same settings automatically.

    Edit: I forgot to say what filters I used. First, I used 'Curves' to brighten things up a bit. I used the 'Cartoon' filter. I resized the image to be much larger. I used the 'Newsprint' filter. I resized the image back to near original size. That's it.

    I think this is a good effect. It helps get the images out of the "uncanny valley" and makes it clear that the flat lighting is a part of the style.

    Outlining isn't the only option, either. I note that Experience Anomaly goes for a "painted" style, probably done in postwork. It's a good choice, because it gives a distinctive look to the art and emphasizes the strength of the artist, rather than the limitations of 3D renders. Photoshop has a couple of filters that can apply this sort of effect easily. So does the GIMP, with the advantage that you can script the process so you can have GIMP process all your images in a queue while you go have supper or whatever.

    Here's a series of stacked renders I combined into a screen for a video game I've been tinkering with... these use pwToon, no postwork (other than stacking PNG files). (This is a screenshot of the LiveCode development environment-- it was part of an article about coding I was writing at the time.)

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  • BurstAngelBurstAngel Posts: 392
    edited December 1969

    OH! I use akvis sketch, too.

    They also have a program that does airbrush. I want to get that one as a base to do some coloring.

  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 884
    edited December 1969

    Another thing that can not go unnoticed in the production of comics, are the lines of motion.
    how comic books are images "static", these are motion lines that give the illusion of motion, speed, velocity, displacement, impact, etc., etc..
    they give life to art.
    without these lines, the characters seem just mannequins posing (I'm saying this in general for all kinds of comics, please no one take offense).
    I am preparing some scenes now with M3, to explain better.
    Shortly, will be ready to post them here.

  • BurstAngelBurstAngel Posts: 392
    edited December 1969

    Oh, I know, Been trying to figure out how to do motion lines in photoshop. The best program for motion lines is Manga Studio. In youtube, they show how pretty easy it is to do them in the program.

    I do know in DeviantArt, there is someone who was kind enough to make brushes of motion lines. Look under screentone or motion lines for manga. Believe me motion lines or "drama" line make a world of difference.

  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 884
    edited December 1969

    Here is some of what I was saying.
    I used M3 rendered in poser.

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  • DireBunnyDireBunny Posts: 424
    edited April 2013

    Here is some of what I was saying.
    I used M3 rendered in poser.


    wow that does make big difference. that's pretty cool.

    Edit : a thread in the Art Studio section of these forums about all these comic book ideas would be cool. where everyone could share their ideas and stuff. (wink, wink nudge nudge. )

    Post edited by DireBunny on
  • galactica1981galactica1981 Posts: 752
    edited April 2013

    When it comes to showing motion in my comics, I use large words by means of Comic Life 2. Here are three successive panels from the Max Rogers comic. (Personally, I would love to be able to use Dreamlight's Motion Master product, but it doesn't work in DAZ 4.5. If anyone has any other ideas how to add lines, I'd love to hear them!)

    This also works well for fight scenes: POW! SOK!

    That's BEO Reaper, although I renamed the character Razorbeast.

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    Post edited by galactica1981 on
  • Herald of FireHerald of Fire Posts: 3,366
    edited April 2013

    Might I recommend motion blur for scenes like that? You don't need to do it in render, you can do it in postwork. Render out the moving part with a transparent background and blur a copy of it on the axis of its movement. You can then overlay this onto your main scene and it will look more dynamic. Text alone doesn't really have the same impact, and for things like movement you really need to show rather than tell.

    One group I found on Deviant Art has some fantastic examples of CG comics. Everything from sci-fi to fantasy. You could do worse than to check it out and perhaps take some tips on improving your own work.

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    Post edited by Herald of Fire on
  • DennyLDennyL Posts: 190
    edited December 1969

    Here are three successive panels from the Max Rogers comic. (Personally, I would love to be able to use Dreamlight's Motion Master product, but it doesn't work in DAZ 4.5. If anyone has any other ideas how to add lines, I'd love to hear them!)

    The second panel would be really well suited for motion lines. Vertical motion lines to show the Razorbeast's descent downward. This can be done in postwork. If you're using Windows, MS Paint is included. There's a line tool. If you hold down the SHIFT key while moving the mouse, you get perfect vertical lines (or perfect horizontal / 45 degrees lines). Most graphic programs I've used with a line tool seem to follow this convention with the SHIFT key.

    A point of caution is to not over do it. This includes both motion lines and motion blurs. I was looking at a comic book and it looked like the colorist got a new toy and couldn't stop playing with it . . . . in every panel. One panel shows a gaussian blur applied to the background. Next panel had 2 characters with the gaussian blur applied to the character further away from the reader. The following panel only had one character but had both arms showing. So the colorist applied the gaussian blur to the arm that was further away. Maybe the colorist thought this would make the comic look more 3D, but it just became annoying to look at.

    Back to your 3 successive panels. I don't know how you're envisioning your comic so this is just my way of doing things. Perhaps you wanted the same camera angle on Razorbeast with changes in the background to show it moving along. Or you may have wanted to play homage to Frankenstein's monster. But Razorbeast looks stiff in the 3 panel sequence. The pose below shows a substitute for panel 2. By using a different camera angle, you can have a more dynamic image of descending, assuming Razorbeast is that flexible. With this pose and angle, you can create an illusion of motion without motion lines.

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  • galactica1981galactica1981 Posts: 752
    edited December 1969

    Unfortunately, the Razorbeast model isn't very flexible. At all. You can't even raise his arms above his head.

  • DennyLDennyL Posts: 190
    edited December 1969

    Unfortunately, the Razorbeast model isn't very flexible. At all. You can't even raise his arms above his head.


    Well, that's good to know ahead of time. I was thinking of buying it. Thanks.

  • DennyLDennyL Posts: 190
    edited December 1969

    I'm surprised at the number of people suggesting a toon shader to convert a 3D looking image into a 2D looking image. Perhaps it's the idea of what a traditional comic book is suppose to look like.

    Back when DC had their Zuda imprint competition, I hand drew my entry, scanned it into my computer, and colored it digitally. I wanted my entry to stand out from the competition so I spent a lot of time digitally coloring it, trying to make it look more and more 3D.

    And here it's the reverse. We have 3D and the goal is to make it look 2D. :gulp:

    Interesting . . . .

  • galactica1981galactica1981 Posts: 752
    edited December 1969

    Thanks for the tip about making lines with MS Paint. I just tried it and it works. I may use that in the comic sometime.

  • daveleitz68daveleitz68 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Denny L said:
    I'm surprised at the number of people suggesting a toon shader to convert a 3D looking image into a 2D looking image. Perhaps it's the idea of what a traditional comic book is suppose to look like.

    Back when DC had their Zuda imprint competition, I hand drew my entry, scanned it into my computer, and colored it digitally. I wanted my entry to stand out from the competition so I spent a lot of time digitally coloring it, trying to make it look more and more 3D.

    And here it's the reverse. We have 3D and the goal is to make it look 2D. :gulp:

    Interesting . . . .

    Well, I made that suggestion based on the fact that the o. p. doesn't want to get into lighting setups. In that case it seems reasonable to me to go for the flatter 2 D look instead of something that looks like preproduction storyboarding for a TV show.

  • zigraphixzigraphix Posts: 2,768
    edited December 1969

    Denny L said:
    I'm surprised at the number of people suggesting a toon shader to convert a 3D looking image into a 2D looking image. Perhaps it's the idea of what a traditional comic book is suppose to look like.


    I can't speak for anyone else, but for me, the manga "look" carries its own cultural context, and I would like to include that in many of my projects. If I could just draw manga images, I would. Unfortunately I have two obstacles in that regard: I have trouble converting from 3D to 2D (I think in 3D) and my hands shake. Between those two factors, I've never been able to put in the practice required to get good at drawing. For me, the best path to getting decent 2D images in the style I want is to work from 3D models.

  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 884
    edited December 1969

    Might I recommend motion blur for scenes like that? You don't need to do it in render, you can do it in postwork. Render out the moving part with a transparent background and blur a copy of it on the axis of its movement. You can then overlay this onto your main scene and it will look more dynamic. Text alone doesn't really have the same impact, and for things like movement you really need to show rather than tell.

    One group I found on Deviant Art has some fantastic examples of CG comics. Everything from sci-fi to fantasy. You could do worse than to check it out and perhaps take some tips on improving your own work.

    The effects that I posted, were not rendered, no. only M3 was rendered in poser. The rest is all postwork.
    Motion blur only works as a part of the process, but not alone.
    see in this picture below, I applied motion blur, and lines:

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  • FirstBastionFirstBastion Posts: 2,371
    edited December 1969

    The experience "Anomaly" art is quite impressive.

  • jorge dorlandojorge dorlando Posts: 884
    edited December 1969

    When it comes to showing motion in my comics, I use large words by means of Comic Life 2. Here are three successive panels from the Max Rogers comic. (Personally, I would love to be able to use Dreamlight's Motion Master product, but it doesn't work in DAZ 4.5. If anyone has any other ideas how to add lines, I'd love to hear them!)

    This also works well for fight scenes: POW! SOK!

    That's BEO Reaper, although I renamed the character Razorbeast.


    Ohh galactica1981!...Dear...You are confused!!
    This is onomatopoeia. that's the "sound" of comics.
    Onomatopoeia means imitating a sound with a phoneme or word. Noises, shouting, singing animals, nature sounds, noise machines, the timbre of the human voice are part of the universe of onomatopoeia. For example, for the Tupi Indians and tak tatak mean to snap or hit and tek is the sound of something breaking.
    When we say that a cricket makes "cri cri" or hit the door and do "toc toc", we are using onomatopoeia.

    AAAI! - Cry of pain
    Ah! - Cry of surprise, pain, fear, awe or discovery
    Ah! Ah! Ah! - Chuckle or laugh
    Bah! - Dislike
    Bam! - Shot revolver
    Bang! - Shot
    Baroom! Baruuum! - Thunder or explosion of the atomic bomb
    Baw! or BUA! - Choro
    Bash! or bow - fall
    Bbrrzz! - Radio tuning
    Brrr booom! - Thunder
    Buow! - Choro
    Burp! - Burp
    Buzzz! bzzz! - Bee flying; whisper
    Chomp! nhoc! nhac! NHEC! - chew
    Chop! tchap! tchape! tchope! - Splashing, skating, wallowing in the mud
    Clang!, Blem!, Blem! - Beat in metallic object
    Crash! Praaa! - Large object colliding with another; Overflow
    Crunch! croc! - Chewing toast
    Ding! dim! ding! trim! - Ringer
    Drip! pim! ping! ding! plic! - Drop
    Dzzzt! Bzzzt! - Short flight bee; rapid whisper; noise in the process of welding
    Eeek! ic! - Hiccup
    Er ... Ahn ... - Indecision
    Gasp! Whew! - Tiredness
    Glub! glub! Glub! blub! glug! - Liquid is swallowed, drink water
    Grrr! - Animal or person grunting
    Gulp! gasp! - Choking
    Ha! Ah! Ah! - Laughter satisfaction, laughter
    Huh? Huh? huh? - Interrogation
    He! he! he! eh! eh! rê! rê! - Chuckle of satisfaction
    Hmmm hum ... - Reflection
    Honk! fom! fom! - Horn
    Hoot! uuu! - Boo
    Hum! - Satisfaction
    Ih! ih! ih! ih!, ri! laughs! laughs! - Laughter ridiculous
    Ioo-hoo! iu-uu!, u-uu! - Call the distance
    Ka-boom! ta-bum! - Pump
    Klunk! clunc! plunc! thlunk! - Thud of falling object
    Knock! Knock! toc! toc! - Beat
    Meow! meow! - Meow feline
    Mmm! Huuum! - Satisfaction, reflection, awe, doubt; mind working
    Mooo! muuu! - Lowing of the buffalo
    Munch! chomp! - Crunching large animal
    Oof! phew! - Sigh of weariness or pain
    Oops! upa! epa! - Astonishment, fear, surprise
    Ouch! ouch! - Cry of pain
    Ow! ouch! - Outburst of pain
    Pat! pat! tap! tap! - Affectionate pat
    Plop! poc! pok! - Beat in hollow object; croaking sapo; wooden leg
    Poof! poof! - Suddenly disappear.
    Poof! poof! - Tiredness
    Pow! pou! - Punch
    Psst! - Expel or draw attention

    Rat-rat-rat! ra-tat-tat! ratataaá-tat - machine gun
    Rawww! Grrr-or! - Roar Gorilla
    Riiinch! - Neigh
    Ring! ding! - Bell ringing
    Rip! - Ripping, cutting scissors
    Roar! rawww! - Roar
    Sniff! fniff! chift! - Sniff, sniff, dog or other animal sniffing a clue
    Under! ah! - Choro
    Soc! pow! sock! - Shitload
    Splash cha! Chuá! - Person or object falling into water
    Splait splash! - Decrease in water; jumping trampoline
    Splop! plop! ploct! plop! - Drop hollow object
    Sssss! Ssss! - Burning object; hissing snake
    Swat! zip! - Object thrown; zipper
    Swish! tchuf! - Water pistol, squirt
    Swooish! fuiiim! vuum! zum! - Something cutting the air quickly; buzzing
    Tatata! Tarará! - Horn
    Thud! tum! - Thud
    Tingeling! blim-Blem! blim-blom! - Ringer modern; bells ringing
    Toing! Toim! Boim! poim! - Spring falling off; jumping character
    Trash! brings! to! - Object snapping, trash falling
    Trim! trim! prim! - Phone ringtone
    Tsk! tss-tss! - Giggle between teeth; contempt, open a bottle cap drink
    Ugh! Ug! - Exclamation
    Uh-HuH! ã-huh! - Nod
    Uhh! huh! - Surprise
    Ungh! - Choro
    Va-voom! - Object through the air
    Vop! - Fast moving object in the air
    Vrom! brum! - Boot drive
    Wap! vap! - Blow with object
    Whack! pow! - Beaten, blow
    Whoosh! swooish! - Air being ripped by object speed
    Wow! wow! - Exclamation admiration
    Yeow! uai! - Exclamation, awe
    Yeowtch! - Exclamation
    Yip! ouch! - Pain
    Zak! vap! - Whack, cutelada
    Zap! - Electric shock
    Zing! zim! - Pinging the arrow
    Zip! vuup! vap! - Buzzing object thrown; coup; zipper closing
    Zok! pof! tou! - Stoned in the head

  • Proxima ShiningProxima Shining Posts: 1,001
    edited December 1969

    This is a cool thread. So informative. Here I learn something new everyday. Thanks for the info, jorge dorlando. :)

  • galactica1981galactica1981 Posts: 752
    edited December 1969

    Well, I would argue that the "sounds" in those panels help the reader follow the movement of the character.

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