Show Us Your Bryce Renders! Part 2

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Comments

  • eireann.sgeireann.sg Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    @David, @ Horo,
    I am happy you liked the little sillyshapes I made.
    There is a lot to discover in Wings. and naturally Bryce.

  • SylverdaliSylverdali Posts: 198
    edited December 1969

    here a render, knot, render time 20 seconds.

    @eireann.sg that is stunning I am still working on wings its hard to get a handle on

  • eireann.sgeireann.sg Posts: 0
    edited November 2012

    Happy you liked it. :)
    here another one i made with shell extrude to create another wacky cube.
    And I used Horos lake HDR! for some extra colour.

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    Post edited by eireann.sg on
  • eireann.sgeireann.sg Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Jamie, glad to hear you got your video watching issues sorted.

    mermaid010, you asked "Why don’t you do some for beginners, most of your videos are for intermediate or advance Brycers."

    The answer to that is that there are 100's possibly 1000's of tutorials for beginners already made - and a lot them can be accessed through the Bryce-Tutorials.info website. So to make more would be "reinventing the wheel". What I want to cover, mostly, is tutorials that take advantage of as yet undocumented Bryce 7.1 Pro features. Tutorials that provide information that isn't available anywhere else and to promote the use of the new feature set. Many of the features in themselves are not hard to use, a beginner could easily turn IBL or TA but... a beginner would not really understand the role of these features in a way a more experienced user would instantly grasp - so I am careful to stress that the tutorials are intended for intermediate to advanced users to try to avoid confusion and frustration for beginners.

    eireann.sg, nice modelling and rendering.

    Some more Happy Buddha's

    I also wanted to download 1 or 2 models from the stanford repository but sadly all files are .GZ files and I cant open them. Besides they are huuuuge.

  • SylverdaliSylverdali Posts: 198
    edited December 1969

    Happy you liked it. :)
    here another one i made with shell extrude to create another wacky cube.
    And I used Horos lake HDR! for some extra colour.
    wow thats stunning

  • SylverdaliSylverdali Posts: 198
    edited November 2012

    well i have tried my hand at landscape "" Serenity Blue HDR, cloud slab

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  • HoroHoro Posts: 4,268
    edited December 1969

    @eireann.sg - you really got the hang on these shapes. I like it a lot.

    @silverdali - nice render but not as stunning as your others. I guess these landscape thingies are rather new for you. Keep them coming, I'm sure you progress swiftly.

  • SylverdaliSylverdali Posts: 198
    edited December 1969

    @Horo, yes i would have to agree, it was a bit hard going but i enjoyed it

  • gendragon3dgendragon3d Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Chohole is right. Thanks for showing me this!

  • GussNemoGussNemo Posts: 1,855
    edited December 1969

    @David: So am I David. It took a bit of time to ferret the problem, but it's now done.

    @Horo: Never knew there was a downloader for YouTube. I'll have to look into it and see if it helps in any way. I did bookmark the Share Tube site, though, since it might come in handy sometime.

    @eireann: Love what you've getting out of Wings, and the Bryce results. They're all very stunning. As to the Stanford Models, there is a Mesh Converter you can download. I've not used it yet, but you can use it to convert those models so they can be used in Bryce. Maybe Horo can explain how it's done.

    @silver: I like that landscape, it's really interesting.

    This is one of the first landscapes I tried when I first downloaded Bryce. It was another case of playing around.

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  • Roland4Roland4 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    The Wild Wall

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  • HoroHoro Posts: 4,268
    edited December 1969

    @GussNemo - the clouds are quite good in one of your first renders.

    @eireann - Meshlab can convert the Stanford files. LordHardDriven helped me with comments. Meanwhile, I made a small tutorial that can be found on my website (see sig). Go to Bryce Documents > Guests (PDF) > Objects > Preparing Objects for Bryce using MeshLab

    @Roland4 - I like the scene and the camera angle. The wall is a bit on the dark side.

  • Roland4Roland4 Posts: 0
    edited November 2012

    @ Horo

    Thank´s for the compliment.

    The camera have no angle. the wall and the ground are two terrains and the ground-terrain have a angle. The big stones in the front of the wall are terrains to, a technic i have learnd from David Brinnen a few years ago. The sun is on the left side of the scene. I think that i need a additionall light.

    The scene itself is recreated from a picture i have see.

    Ps: I have add two lights, one in the background (blue light) and one in the foreground (red light). Is it better now ?

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    Post edited by Roland4 on
  • pumecopumeco Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Still going through David's videos and have to say that strange reflection issue seems quite a biggie!

    Thing is, if they fix it it might increase the render times because I'm guessing Bryce is missing out some calculations in order to arrive at those effects. A bit like telling a Radiosity renderer to ignore, say, some reflection characteristics to speed things up a bit.

  • eireann.sgeireann.sg Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Horo said:

    @eireann - Meshlab can convert the Stanford files. LordHardDriven helped me with comments. Meanwhile, I made a small tutorial that can be found on my website (see sig). Go to Bryce Documents > Guests (PDF) > Objects > Preparing Objects for Bryce using MeshLab

    @eireann: As to the Stanford Models, there is a Mesh Converter you can download. I've not used it yet, but you can use it to convert those models so they can be used in Bryce. Maybe Horo can explain how it's done.

    Horo, GussNemo,
    thanks for the tip.
    My problem is how to open the compressed files. they have a .tar.gz format which my computer cant open.
    if the files were .zip files then no problem.
    My old computer came with Winrar, maybe I can try that.

  • kiwi_ggkiwi_gg Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Stanford models in converted file formats free download zip files those that would like to have them are available here.
    www.mrbluesummers.com

    Cheers
    GG

  • eireann.sgeireann.sg Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    kiwi_gg said:
    Stanford models in converted file formats free download zip files those that would like to have them are available here.
    www.mrbluesummers.com

    Cheers
    GG

    Thanks for the very helpful link :)

  • GussNemoGussNemo Posts: 1,855
    edited December 1969

    @Roland: Both of those images look nice. I've seen areas like the first image in the RW, but for monitor display the second is better.

    @Horo: Thank you. That image was one of the first ones I made after getting Bryce. I didn't know what I was doing, or what to do, but I liked how the whole image turned out and kept it.

    This is another of my very first images after getting Bryce. It was just play, but I liked its look and hung onto it. I called it Perfect Landing.

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  • LordHardDrivenLordHardDriven Posts: 917
    edited December 1969

    mermaid010, you asked "Why don’t you do some for beginners, most of your videos are for intermediate or advance Brycers."

    The answer to that is that there are 100's possibly 1000's of tutorials for beginners already made - and a lot them can be accessed through the Bryce-Tutorials.info website. So to make more would be "reinventing the wheel". What I want to cover, mostly, is tutorials that take advantage of as yet undocumented Bryce 7.1 Pro features. Tutorials that provide information that isn't available anywhere else and to promote the use of the new feature set.

    Perhaps a nice thing you and Horo could do is go thru at sometime and review the more beginner oriented tutorials on your site and come up with a group of those beginner tutorials that form a comprehensive base of knowledge from which a beginner might move from beginner to intermediate. That way rather then just saying you don't really do beginner level tutorials you could point people to this group of "reccommended" tutorials?

    On a different note, there is something I've been meaning to ask if you could do sometime but I keep forgetting. In the Pro Materials that come with Bryce 7 Pro are a number of libraries named with a three letter prefix followed by your name such as Mop_davidbrinnen, Org_davidbrinnen, Pal_davidbrinnen, for examples. I've included a picture below that shows what I'm talking about. Each of these libraries contain a fair number of materials but the descriptions all read like Mop Varient followed by www.davidbrinnen.com. Now the reason I mention just these libraries and not all of the libraries in the Pro Materials section is because these libraries with the 3 letter prefix followed by your name all lack something the others do not. They lack a name and/or description that give you some clue as to what the material is and/or how to best use it. All the other libraries contain materials whose name makes it clear what the material is for and/or a description that gives useful tips on using the material. What I'm asking is, would you consider producing a list of names and descriptions for these libraries and materials so that one could get a sense of if a particular material would work for something they're working on without having to go thru and keep trying random materials hoping one might work for them? I think if you did and then made that list available to people or even better yet apply the names and descriptions in an update of the installer containing the pro materials, it would help the users to start making better use of those materials. I suspect that largely those materials get skipped over because people don't know what they are or what to use them for and they don't want to bother with radomly plugging materials in to try to figure them out.

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  • LordHardDrivenLordHardDriven Posts: 917
    edited December 1969

    Horo said:

    @eireann - Meshlab can convert the Stanford files. LordHardDriven helped me with comments. Meanwhile, I made a small tutorial that can be found on my website (see sig). Go to Bryce Documents > Guests (PDF) > Objects > Preparing Objects for Bryce using MeshLab

    @eireann: As to the Stanford Models, there is a Mesh Converter you can download. I've not used it yet, but you can use it to convert those models so they can be used in Bryce. Maybe Horo can explain how it's done.

    Horo, GussNemo,
    thanks for the tip.
    My problem is how to open the compressed files. they have a .tar.gz format which my computer cant open.
    if the files were .zip files then no problem.
    My old computer came with Winrar, maybe I can try that.

    Winrar can open that format of archive (called a tarball I believe) but you might have to specify for winrar to open it in the file associations part of the program first, which can be found under Options -> Settings -> Integration

  • Roland4Roland4 Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    I think now it´s best results.

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  • David BrinnenDavid Brinnen Posts: 2,833
    edited December 1969

    pumeco said:
    Still going through David's videos and have to say that strange reflection issue seems quite a biggie!

    Thing is, if they fix it it might increase the render times because I'm guessing Bryce is missing out some calculations in order to arrive at those effects. A bit like telling a Radiosity renderer to ignore, say, some reflection characteristics to speed things up a bit.

    So far as I've been able to tell from testing, it seems to be something to do with the anisotropic vector response. What reflection is applied under certain conditions, even if specularity is set to 0, linking between diffuse and reflection automatically generates a specular response. This in turn causes the render engine to consider specular halo settings and anisotropic vectors - even when you don't want it to - even when anisotropy is set to zero also it seems. I think this is because the reflection control tries to be "helpful" - you can observe this yourself in a series of tests by making comparisons between response of the diffuse channel under the changing circumstances of reflection without channel control, reflection through alpha channel and reflection through alpha channel with alpha scaling. Running all three at 50% - different outcomes occur. What is not clear at first glance is that specular response according to specular halo values also shifts. But by isolating in an entirely lit by specular environment, this seems to be so also. Helpful but annoying at the same time.

  • David BrinnenDavid Brinnen Posts: 2,833
    edited December 1969

    mermaid010, you asked "Why don’t you do some for beginners, most of your videos are for intermediate or advance Brycers."

    The answer to that is that there are 100's possibly 1000's of tutorials for beginners already made - and a lot them can be accessed through the Bryce-Tutorials.info website. So to make more would be "reinventing the wheel". What I want to cover, mostly, is tutorials that take advantage of as yet undocumented Bryce 7.1 Pro features. Tutorials that provide information that isn't available anywhere else and to promote the use of the new feature set.

    Perhaps a nice thing you and Horo could do is go thru at sometime and review the more beginner oriented tutorials on your site and come up with a group of those beginner tutorials that form a comprehensive base of knowledge from which a beginner might move from beginner to intermediate. That way rather then just saying you don't really do beginner level tutorials you could point people to this group of "reccommended" tutorials?

    On a different note, there is something I've been meaning to ask if you could do sometime but I keep forgetting. In the Pro Materials that come with Bryce 7 Pro are a number of libraries named with a three letter prefix followed by your name such as Mop_davidbrinnen, Org_davidbrinnen, Pal_davidbrinnen, for examples. I've included a picture below that shows what I'm talking about. Each of these libraries contain a fair number of materials but the descriptions all read like Mop Varient followed by www.davidbrinnen.com. Now the reason I mention just these libraries and not all of the libraries in the Pro Materials section is because these libraries with the 3 letter prefix followed by your name all lack something the others do not. They lack a name and/or description that give you some clue as to what the material is and/or how to best use it. All the other libraries contain materials whose name makes it clear what the material is for and/or a description that gives useful tips on using the material. What I'm asking is, would you consider producing a list of names and descriptions for these libraries and materials so that one could get a sense of if a particular material would work for something they're working on without having to go thru and keep trying random materials hoping one might work for them? I think if you did and then made that list available to people or even better yet apply the names and descriptions in an update of the installer containing the pro materials, it would help the users to start making better use of those materials. I suspect that largely those materials get skipped over because people don't know what they are or what to use them for and they don't want to bother with radomly plugging materials in to try to figure them out.

    For the tutorials there will be a rating system on the website to allow for peer review. Another reason that I don't do beginner tutorials is because I'm not really in a position to judge what is the most appropriate thing for a beginner to know is (though it is kind of you think that I am). However I am self taught, and for a year or more all I had was the Bryce 5 manual and Bryce 5 - the internet was yet to arrive in our town. I did the tutorials in the manual and then started making stuff up. I spent a lot of that time just fiddling with the DTE - if I had had access to the tutorials on line, I might have taken more of an interest in modelling, or making scenes. I don't know if that would be better or not. So what I'm saying is, my perspective is rather biased. Judgements made by beginners will be of more value since beginners will know what can drive them forwards with enthusiasm in their hobby.

    As for the materials... well if you'd have asked me this in 2005 when I gave them to DAZ 3D, then I would have known what to say. But somehow they got lost in the system and have only resurfaced recently (I believe the disparity between "DAZ time" and time as we experience it in every day life has already been discussed elsewhere - so I hardly need to labour the point here). But after all this time (real time), even I don't know what they are all for. Probably the best thing I can do, is make a tutorial about how to go about assessing what a material might be useful for by looking at the material properties. This then will not only solve the issue of the mysterious materials, but it will solve the issue of future mysterious materials. And it will be an interesting thing to do and it will be something new - newer than seven years ago! I could also cover what to do to go about updating them to include modern features. Maybe I will make a tutorial for each set. That should cover a lot of options. How does that sound?

  • David BrinnenDavid Brinnen Posts: 2,833
    edited December 1969
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  • mermaid010mermaid010 Posts: 1,115
    edited December 1969

    Jamie, glad to hear you got your video watching issues sorted.

    mermaid010, you asked "Why don’t you do some for beginners, most of your videos are for intermediate or advance Brycers."

    The answer to that is that there are 100's possibly 1000's of tutorials for beginners already made - and a lot them can be accessed through the Bryce-Tutorials.info website. So to make more would be "reinventing the wheel". What I want to cover, mostly, is tutorials that take advantage of as yet undocumented Bryce 7.1 Pro features. Tutorials that provide information that isn't available anywhere else and to promote the use of the new feature set. Many of the features in themselves are not hard to use, a beginner could easily turn IBL or TA but... a beginner would not really understand the role of these features in a way a more experienced user would instantly grasp - so I am careful to stress that the tutorials are intended for intermediate to advanced users to try to avoid confusion and frustration for beginners.

    eireann.sg, nice modelling and rendering.

    Some more Happy Buddha's


    I agree with you, David there are 100s of tutorials for beginners online. Robin Wood’s tutorials are great, but you have wonderful way of explaining things – a great teacher. Your videos are fascinating and I’m encouraged to try them, even though I don’t understand what I’m doing. Normally I follow what you are doing. I was hoping you will direct me to some of your earlier videos, not found on Bryce-info, but going by your reply to LordHardDriven, I guess there aren’t any.

    This is a proof of your teaching method. This is my very first attempt at using Wings3d. I downloaded the program on Saturday.

    These two examples were done, following your Wings3D to render to postwork, but I did not follow the video completely. I used a preset sky from the Fantasy-Scifi catergory. I used the materials for the Wing3d and the ground plane as per the video, used the sky for the hdri and the settings you suggested for the IBL and Render option except that I used 64RPP and not 256RPP for the final render.

    In 2nd image- I changed the ground plane to reflective, and added a reflective material to the object and rendered with Superfine 64RPP.

    I did not save as the images as hdri or follow the rest of the video as it was a bit beyond my comprehension. Hopefully it is something to look forward at a later date.

    Thanks for introducing me to a new toy. Wings3d is a cool program and its free. :-)

    Unfortunately I’m one of those people who needs to settle for freebies. :down:

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  • mermaid010mermaid010 Posts: 1,115
    edited December 1969


    As for the materials... well if you'd have asked me this in 2005 when I gave them to DAZ 3D, then I would have known what to say. But somehow they got lost in the system and have only resurfaced recently (I believe the disparity between "DAZ time" and time as we experience it in every day life has already been discussed elsewhere - so I hardly need to labour the point here). But after all this time (real time), even I don't know what they are all for. Probably the best thing I can do, is make a tutorial about how to go about assessing what a material might be useful for by looking at the material properties. This then will not only solve the issue of the mysterious materials, but it will solve the issue of future mysterious materials. And it will be an interesting thing to do and it will be something new - newer than seven years ago! I could also cover what to do to go about updating them to include modern features. Maybe I will make a tutorial for each set. That should cover a lot of options. How does that sound?

    Sounds great to me and I will be looking forward to them.

  • HoroHoro Posts: 4,268
    edited December 1969

    [Horo, GussNemo,
    thanks for the tip.
    My problem is how to open the compressed files. they have a .tar.gz format which my computer cant open.
    if the files were .zip files then no problem.
    My old computer came with Winrar, maybe I can try that.

    Winrar can open that format of archive (called a tarball I believe) but you might have to specify for winrar to open it in the file associations part of the program first, which can be found under Options -> Settings -> Integration

    I use the Total Commander http://www.ghisler.com/ which is shareware. It can also open Linux tar and gzip files and it does so as if they were folders. You can copy out of archives and into archives without ever unpacking them. I have used this tool since Windows 3.1, Updates are free forever if you get a license for $44.

  • KeryaKerya Posts: 7,185
    edited December 1969

    I love my free ExtractNow: http://www.extractnow.com/

    What archive types are supported?
    zip (+jar,xpi), bzip2 (+bz2,tbz2,tbz), rar, arj, z, lzh (+lha), 7z, cab, nsis, lzma, lzma86, xz (+txz), ppmd, udf, xar, mub, hfs, dmg, compound (+msi,doc,xls,ppt), wim (+swm), iso, chm (+chm,chi,chq,chw,hxs,hxi,hxr,hxq,hxw,lit), split (+001), rpm, deb, cpio, tar, gzip (+gz,gzip,tgz,tpz), mslz, flv, swf, ntfs (+ntfs,img), fat (+fat,img), mbr, vhd, pe, elf, apm, macho, ace, sit

    I don't know of any other that opens sit on a PC.

  • KeryaKerya Posts: 7,185
    edited December 1969

    kiwi_gg said:
    Stanford models in converted file formats free download zip files those that would like to have them are available here.
    www.mrbluesummers.com

    Cheers
    GG

    Thank you!!!

  • HoroHoro Posts: 4,268
    edited December 1969

    @LordHardDriven - concerning the names of David's contributions to the materials library. I understand what you say. In fact, David and I had discussed that several years ago when I wanted to change names and add comments. Problem is, if you do not name each new item for the library and add a comment at the moment you save it, you'll forget about the details as soon as you add more. Working on a project can mean creating a couple of materials, and naming and commenting each one will hinder the development of the scene.

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