Help! Someone gave me a kitten and I think one of us is in danger!

2

Comments

  • blondie9999blondie9999 Posts: 726
    edited December 1969

    If you know nothing about kittens and cats and aren't willing to spend a fair amount of time learning, I would VERY strongly suggest you give the kitten back or take it to a no-kill shelter. There is a great deal more to adopting a kitten than merely taking it in and feeding it.

  • RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Omg Yes! my friend came and collected little kitty. I asked how old she is and they said only a few weeks old. So even though it kinda broke my heart and part of me wanted to keep it, I did the right thing and let it go. That kitten needs a mother and I am just not it. But I did like it so I think I will do some more research and finally get an adult cat as I always planned. But before I do I want to be prepared with all the proper equipment. The thing is when somebody or something needs you that much and obviously just wants attention and cuddling it is heart tugging.

    Also makes me realize how living alone can make you selfish, I haven't had to worry about somebody else like that in a long time. Even now, though I love my niece to death and have her over almost all the time, I love it best when she goes home. :lol:

  • Kendall SearsKendall Sears Posts: 1,888
    edited December 1969

    Omg Yes! my friend came and collected little kitty. I asked how old she is and they said only a few weeks old. So even though it kinda broke my heart and part of me wanted to keep it, I did the right thing and let it go. That kitten needs a mother and I am just not it. But I did like it so I think I will do some more research and finally get an adult cat as I always planned. But before I do I want to be prepared with all the proper equipment. The thing is when somebody or something needs you that much and obviously just wants attention and cuddling it is heart tugging.

    Also makes me realize how living alone can make you selfish, I haven't had to worry about somebody else like that in a long time. Even now, though I love my niece to death and have her over almost all the time, I love it best when she goes home. :lol:

    The next time, go and meet with your intended pet and see if the two of you get along. Spend more than a few minutes with it. Both you and it should feel comfortable with each other, don't hope that "you'll grow on each other." If you're going for a cat, try for an early adolescent. Full adult cats tend to be set in their ways and WILL NOT change to fit your desires. Adolescent cats are more willing to compromise... and compromise it will be.

    Kendall

  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 19,890
    edited December 1969

    I agree with Kendall there. When we got our two, they were around 6-7 months old, had already been "fixed" by the rescue, and settled in with the minimum of problems, but still young enough to be cuddly and playful.

  • RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Of course now that it's gone I miss it, but I have to leave soon so I am glad she doesn't have to be in the house alone. And she's back with her real mama so that's good. I'll never forget my night with the kitten though. :red:

  • BC RiceBC Rice Posts: 493
    edited October 2012

    This...was a bizarre thread.

    I think I'm probably different than some people, though. I often times think more of animals than I do people. I can't imagine adopting a baby and then deciding it's "annoying" and so returning it to some orphanage, no more than I would adopt an animal and then decide it's annoying and so it should go away.

    But the way we behave with animals in human culture is bizarre regardless. We eat some and adopt others. The whole thing is bizarre.

    However one thing is abundantly clear. You, Romancefantasy, should never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, never adopt anything again ever. Like, ever.

    Do they still make Chia pets?

    Post edited by BC Rice on
  • Kendall SearsKendall Sears Posts: 1,888
    edited December 1969

    BC Rice said:
    This...was a bizarre thread.

    I think I'm probably different than some people, though. I often times think more of animals than I do people. I can't imagine adopting a baby and then deciding it's "annoying" and so returning it to some orphanage, no more than I would adopt an animal and then decide it's annoying and so it should go away.

    But the way we behave with animals in human culture is bizarre regardless. We eat some and adopt others. The whole thing is bizarre.

    However one thing is abundantly clear. You, Romancefantasy, should never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, never adopt anything again ever. Like, ever.

    Do they still make Chia pets?

    She didn't "adopt" this pet, it was GIVEN to her. She did not select the kitten, someone else did. In this case, it more a "preliminary visit" like children up for adoption go through. If the environment is not conducive to the well being of both parties, then both parties suffer. The animal more than the caretaker.

    In this case, she was absolutely right. I disagree greatly with you, she showed great concern for the well being of the kitten, given the situation she was in. When she's ready to take on the responsibility, then she and the animal *she* selects will be happy together.

    Kendall

  • JaguarEllaJaguarElla Posts: 10,684
    edited December 1969

    I have taken dumped kittens to the animal welfare league myself, and caught strays no-one else would care for before they starved, does that make me a callous animal hater?
    Hoarders of animals claim to 'love' them too.
    I think Romance Fantasy behaved very responsibly actually and might even take the kitty when it is older and better able to cope away from mum, I still would suggest two kittens though, preferably from the same litter, and no, it is not cruel to lock them in a room with adquate food, water and litter tray, they can do many things that will harm them left to run amok like chew electrical cords etc.

  • PennamePenname Posts: 224
    edited December 1969

    It sounds like the kitten was a little too young to be removed from its mother anyway. Small creatures do need a lot of love and attention and animal care can be scary for the less experienced for sure. I got both my cats at 6 month, having previously owned only dogs, and that's a perfect age for them to adapt to their new environment and at 2 years they are still incredibly playful and fun, and sometimes totally annoying. They are definitely not like dogs but I wish I had got cats sooner. For an OT thread, that was an interesting one.

  • larsmidnattlarsmidnatt Posts: 3,453
    edited October 2012

    Even if someone was to adopt a pet willingly and find out that it was incompatible they aren't bizarre or evil if they decide to return it.

    Post edited by larsmidnatt on
  • Proxima ShiningProxima Shining Posts: 1,001
    edited December 1969

    Now and then I read in newspapers about people who buy cats or dogs (mostly dogs) but then find out that animals are not toys but living creatures and require too much work (they need care, food, regular walking). So they put them in a car, drive them somewhere and then throw them out, either on a street or near some forest etc. The poor things are then lucky if someone finds them before they are run over by a car, starve to death or similar. I think Romancefantasy was very responsible in comparison - when she realized that she cannot give the kitten enough care, she returned it to people who she knows that they will take good care of it. And the kitten can even be with mommy again. This is how everyone in a similar situation should behave.

  • ZaarinZaarin Posts: 385
    edited December 1969

    I spent over a year looking for the right cat, and when I met her I knew--and so did she. You really need to be involved in the selection process; as others said, while the thought is nice, pets don't make good gifts. Mine was a kitten, though, about six months old when I got her. For the first month she drove me out of my mind, and there was a point I very seriously considered returning her to the rescue I got her from--I'm glad I stuck with it, 'cause I couldn't live without her now. But I too will probably look into an adult cat next time around (which hopefully is a long, long, long, long time from now...).

  • JasmineSkunkJasmineSkunk Posts: 846
    edited October 2012

    This was a very interesting thread. Not so much because of the kitten dilemma itself as much as it was interesting to read how other people responded to it. So many diverse points of view!! Very interesting, indeed.Thanks for sharing your tale of adventure with us, Romancefantasy! I really enjoyed it! :)

    Post edited by JasmineSkunk on
  • RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Even if I do all the research, prepared my home and myself for a kitten, if I find that it is too much for me to handle then I would return the kitten or cat again. Why should an animal suffer because it's human can't cope? I know people love their pets, and I've had parakeets and now a fish so I know how much fun and joy they can bring. But just like some people shouldn't be parents, some people shouldn't own certain animals; at least not without a lot of training, preparation, and thought. I did like the kitten, and honestly just now when I got home I felt it's absence. But the kitten is back with it's mother and I think that is best for now. I even said that if they still have it when it's a little older I would take it, just not out of the thin blue sky. One thing though I have a new respect for Kitties and the people who love them.

  • zigraphixzigraphix Posts: 2,768
    edited December 1969

    I think you did the right thing, and I agree with the suggestions of an adolescent or young adult cat when you're ready. My younger daughter, who was 17 at the time, picked out a 10 month old cat as her first pet (that she had chosen), and now they're inseparable. Autumn hangs around the kitchen door looking mournful whenever my daughter is away overnight. Heaven knows how we'll all survive the trauma when my daughter goes to college next year! ;)

    As for animals, humans, and adoption... I AM an adoptive parent, of two children who were not infants when they came to us, and very involved in the adoption community, and I can honestly and wholeheartedly say that sometimes adoptions don't work out. A good friend of mine ended up adopting a sixth child when her first parents just couldn't cope and disrupted the adoption. It was probably the best decision for all concerned.

    I truly believe that the responsible thing, whether we're talking about humans or pets, is to do your best, but acknowledge what you can't handle and find a good home or temporary placement if necessary.

  • ZaarinZaarin Posts: 385
    edited December 1969

    zigraphix said:
    I think you did the right thing, and I agree with the suggestions of an adolescent or young adult cat when you're ready. My younger daughter, who was 17 at the time, picked out a 10 month old cat as her first pet (that she had chosen), and now they're inseparable. Autumn hangs around the kitchen door looking mournful whenever my daughter is away overnight. Heaven knows how we'll all survive the trauma when my daughter goes to college next year! ;)

    As for animals, humans, and adoption... I AM an adoptive parent, of two children who were not infants when they came to us, and very involved in the adoption community, and I can honestly and wholeheartedly say that sometimes adoptions don't work out. A good friend of mine ended up adopting a sixth child when her first parents just couldn't cope and disrupted the adoption. It was probably the best decision for all concerned.

    I truly believe that the responsible thing, whether we're talking about humans or pets, is to do your best, but acknowledge what you can't handle and find a good home or temporary placement if necessary.


    Oh, cool, I'm adopted myself (though I was adopted as an infant...the arrangements were made before I was actually born if I'm not mistaken). :)

  • BurstAngelBurstAngel Posts: 398
    edited December 1969

    The kitten does sound too young, The best time to get a kitten is about 8 weeks old, by then its already weaned, independent, cuddly, cute, potty trained, fits in your hands like a furry glove....did I mention cute.
    When I adopted our kitten, the first thing I asked was its age.
    I suggest doing a little reading about cats in general so you would know what to expect.
    Pets and people do need to "click" to actually work so don't feel bad about returning it.

  • RomancefantasyRomancefantasy Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    That kitten was absolutely adorable, and it is flattering when somebody needs you so much. I knew I couldn't give that kitten what it needed which was constant attention and reassurance. I understand that she was very young which is why I feel so bad that they took it away from it's mother too soon. If I had been the only option for that kitten then believe that I would not have turned my back on it. But this worked out better for both parties, the kitty gets mommy back and I get some sleep. ;-)

    I will say that I do miss that little kitty though. I remember this morning when she peeped up at me from under a table and then came running to me to rub against my ankles. That kind of affection is heartwarming.

  • IceScribeIceScribe Posts: 0
    edited December 1969

    Maybe it goes without saying, but I did not read that the kitten was cuddled. If the baby had been picked up and cuddled, I'm pretty sure it would have stopped crying and started purring.. The claws of kittens are not really that sharp. They curl up into little fuzz balls when happy.

    I've rasied a few kittnens in my time and what is fun for a cat person is cuddling with them and playing with them. Then they eat a little, poop a little and fall into a deep sleep---literally, often right where they were sitting. Of course, close contact with a cat to me is very satisfying.

    I'd love to hear that a shelter or rescue cat found a good home. but it seems like it would be a bother. They make noise, they try hard to get attention to be fed, to play, to interact. If they don't like the litter box, and if it is not cleaned daily, they will choose somewhere else in the house. They will have hairballs even with short hair. There are products that remove the odor of accidents.

    They are companions, not something to put in a closet when they annoy.What a insensitive thing to do to a baby that is just trying to get what it needs. That is solitary confinement which even humans don't like much. It is very bad for brain development and socializing.

    They will demand affection when they want it and ignore you when they don't. .They will sit on your computer and shed everywhere and claw the door jamb or the chair if they don't have a clawing post. Declawing is cruel and illegal in some places. They are living and emotional creatures. So I'm thinking a cat for a pet at this time is not a good idea. .Fish seem perfect for a person who doesnt want to cuddle or have any interaction outside of a container. I've had some very friendly shubunkins. But they do like company of other fish.

  • Satira CapriccioSatira Capriccio Posts: 522
    edited December 1969

    I was also working online when I adopted my current cat (as a kitten). I THOUGHT I was getting a quiet, aloof kitten based on her behavior in the shelter, but turned out she'd been "in disguise." Once home, she was just as active and inquisitive as any other kitten ... and needy for attention.

    So, I'd stick her in the top of my shirt, and she'd happily go to sleep.

    Unfortunately, she grew out of the need to cuddle and is just as aloof as I had expected her to be.

    Pity that, because sometimes > I < want to cuddle!

    IceScribe said:
    Maybe it goes without saying, but I did not read that the kitten was cuddled. If the baby had been picked up and cuddled, I'm pretty sure it would have stopped crying and started purring.. The claws of kittens are not really that sharp. They curl up into little fuzz balls when happy.

  • shaaeliashaaelia Posts: 623
    edited December 1969

    I'm glad that things worked out for you and the kitten, romance. It's tough having a very very young cat suddenly thrust upon you. It sounds like you did the right thing for you and the kitten. I hope that you have more luck next time around :-)

    I can remember the dim dark days when I first got my (now 11 year old) cat. I didn't sleep for about 3 weeks because I had no where else to put her. She kept sleeping on my head, and it really isn't fun waking up with fur balls. Kitten claws are sharp, but kitten teeth are needles - she bit right through my thumb once - scared her more than it hurt me though! She's the sweetest thing now - sleeps most of the time and still likes a game. She's super gentle with kids too - you can teach cats to mouth rather than bite and not to use those sharp claws either.

    Was interesting reading this and seeing your journey, and the opinions of others.

  • LeatherGryphonLeatherGryphon Posts: 1,849
    edited October 2012

    Again I'm late to the party. But it's time for the grump to weigh-in on dogs, cats and people who give pets.

    I like cats more than dogs. I've had several cats but only one that I really liked.

    I grew up with dogs. Our family had three medium size dogs over the years (Pitbull, collie, mutt). All three were good indoor/outdoor dogs but we lived in a small community with lots of free-running land (fields & woods) behind the house where they could chase rabbits, cows & skunks and attack (unsuccessfully) porcupines. They could run through mud, stands of burdock & other spiky seeds, and roll in carrion. I can't imagine trying to raise a happy dog in a city. Right now I live in a small apartment in a house where the occupants of the rest of the house have two dogs that are always either in the house or tied up out back. They make me very unhappy with their barking everytime they hear me using the bathroom :-(

    OK, enough on dogs. As much as I loved my cats. I would not want to go through raising a kitten again. The claws, the climbing of pants, drapes and shins. The hair gets everywhere. And then there are your friends who can't come over anymore because of their allergies to cat dander. The smell of the litterbox isn't bad if you tend it everyday but you're still dealing with the scattered grains and the thought that there are poop & pee molecules floating around in the air.

    Be wary of people who want to give you a kitten (or cat). Their motives are not altruistic. There is some reason they want to get rid of it.

    I'm retired. I live alone I have very few visitors so I've had several people try to give me a kitten to "fill my life". No thank you! I'm old enough to know I'm not a pet person and I'm very very happy knowing that nothing will get moved, broken, clawed, chewed, or pooped on unless I do it myself. 8-o

    Post edited by LeatherGryphon on
  • larsmidnattlarsmidnatt Posts: 3,453
    edited October 2012

    . I can't imagine trying to raise a happy dog in a city.

    The city I live in is very dog friendly, it's not hard to do. There are plenty of places to take the dog, lots of events and even a baseball game once a year.

    Sometimes people pick the wrong breeds for their lifestyle, their living space and often don't realize the needs of the animal. for example a collie is not an apartment dog by any means. And they need to be very active, and the owner needs to be active with it and give the dog things to dog regularly.

    My dogs stay in the house most of the time, but they are barnyard dogs and that's plenty of space for them. We have a fenced yard for a bit of running around when I am watching them. I never leave my dogs out alone, its not wise. But that's a different story. I got my dogs when i lived in an apartment, I think i was still in my one-bedroom apartment. Being small dogs they can run around the apartment and keep each other exercised and entertained. now that we are in a house they run room to room sometimes.

    For those who only want medium sized breeds (or even some large breeds) an apartment is doable, but they need to take the dogs out on long walks daily. And hikes and things like that. A lot of folks think they will do this, but then don't after they get the animal and life kicks in. So really i don't recommend it myself, large breeds in a small apartment isn't all that fun most of the time.

    I knew a few neighbors that were very good with giving their dogs tons of attention and exercise, had golden retrievers in a 2 bedroom apartment, but took the dog just about everywhere when she could.

    Post edited by larsmidnatt on
  • TimbalesTimbales Posts: 1,228
    edited October 2012

    late to the party, but:

    They make litter for kittens with small granules, it's easier on their little paws. Kittens have lots of energy, interactive toys will keep them busy for a long time - things like mouse toys that make noise, toys that are on elastic that will snap back and move around, motorized toys, etc.

    Post edited by Timbales on
  • ChoholeChohole Posts: 19,890
    edited December 1969

    I tend to disagree there. We bought our 2 quite a few toys, the only ones that they really liked were the soft foam balls. Apart from that their favourite toys are pieces of string, a plant label they found, sweet wrappers, bubble wrap, tinfoil rolled up in a ball, odd shoe laces, and anything else that can nick when we are not looking.

  • LedheadLedhead Posts: 1,586
    edited December 1969

    chohole said:
    I tend to disagree there. We bought our 2 quite a few toys, the only ones that they really liked were the soft foam balls. Apart from that their favourite toys are pieces of string, a plant label they found, sweet wrappers, bubble wrap, tinfoil rolled up in a ball, odd shoe laces, and anything else that can nick when we are not looking.

    I agree with that. You really don't need to purchase any toys. It seems they have plenty of fun with a speck of dust and any other thing they can find. We do have a few toys lying around and they occasionally play with them, but no more than with carpet fiber.

  • JaguarEllaJaguarElla Posts: 10,684
    edited December 1969

    Paper bags is the feline No1 fav toy.
    your curtain tassles (and I once had quite elaborate ones :long: )
    your net curtains (mine have gaping holes)
    pingpong balls
    anything with feathers (not nessesarily attached to a bird!)

  • zigraphixzigraphix Posts: 2,768
    edited December 1969

    And don't forget laser pointers! :D

  • Kendall SearsKendall Sears Posts: 1,888
    edited December 1969

    chohole said:
    I tend to disagree there. We bought our 2 quite a few toys, the only ones that they really liked were the soft foam balls. Apart from that their favourite toys are pieces of string, a plant label they found, sweet wrappers, bubble wrap, tinfoil rolled up in a ball, odd shoe laces, and anything else that can nick when we are not looking.

    Like a young child at Christmas... ignore the toy and play in the box. Alexa had this large heavy cardboard box that I had from a shipment, and for the longest time, it dominated part of the common area of the house. She made it her "world of the day" until it finally succumbed to age (and abuse), and she outgrew "playhouses"

    Kendall

  • LedheadLedhead Posts: 1,586
    edited December 1969

    We have a $150 six foot tall cat tree house and none of the cats (2 adults and 1 kitten) use it except the baby, but all she seems to do with it is use the top level for her bed. Well I guess she does go nuts in it sometimes.

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