A rough road

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Comments

  • frank0314frank0314 Posts: 8,584
    edited December 1969

    lol, don't let some see you say that. They will have your head for it.

  • hecate61hecate61 Posts: 21
    edited December 1969

    While some spelling errors can be as a result of some type of learning disability, I think the vast majority are from haste, not knowing the correct way to spell or use a word, unfamiliarity with the language, or just plain laziness. I don’t know how many times I’ve read something that contains errors in usage in at least one of the following:

    1. There/they’re/their
    2. Than/then
    3. Definitely/defiantly
    4. Breath/breathe
    5. Of/have

    I’ve been reading some stories by a particular author in which she consistently spells the word “front” as “frount” and another author spells “barely” as “barley” in every instance it occurs, which I find very distracting and which detracts from the story.

    Also, it’s not just Joe Guy-on-the-Street that makes errors in spelling or usage, because I’ve seen them in books from major publishers. I don’t know whether the author actually made the mistake, but it’s definitely a failure on the part of the editor in not catching and correcting the error.

  • frank0314frank0314 Posts: 8,584
    edited October 2012

    I have dyslexia so I have a tendency of murdering the English language. Thank god for spell checker

    Post edited by frank0314 on
  • mjc1016mjc1016 Posts: 7,217
    edited December 1969

    hecate61 said:
    While some spelling errors can be as a result of some type of learning disability, I think the vast majority are from haste, not knowing the correct way to spell or use a word, unfamiliarity with the language, or just plain laziness. I don’t know how many times I’ve read something that contains errors in usage in at least one of the following:

    1. There/they’re/their
    2. Than/then
    3. Definitely/defiantly
    4. Breath/breathe
    5. Of/have

    I’ve been reading some stories by a particular author in which she consistently spells the word “front” as “frount” and another author spells “barely” as “barley” in every instance it occurs, which I find very distracting and which detracts from the story.

    Also, it’s not just Joe Guy-on-the-Street that makes errors in spelling or usage, because I’ve seen them in books from major publishers. I don’t know whether the author actually made the mistake, but it’s definitely a failure on the part of the editor in not catching and correcting the error.

    Don't leave out the fact that your short list is very common in newspapers, online news sources and the 'raw' wire service articles (AP, etc).

    There used to be a job called editor...

  • Kendall SearsKendall Sears Posts: 1,882
    edited October 2012

    hecate61 said:
    While some spelling errors can be as a result of some type of learning disability, I think the vast majority are from haste, not knowing the correct way to spell or use a word, unfamiliarity with the language, or just plain laziness. I don’t know how many times I’ve read something that contains errors in usage in at least one of the following:

    1. There/they’re/their
    2. Than/then
    3. Definitely/defiantly
    4. Breath/breathe
    5. Of/have

    I’ve been reading some stories by a particular author in which she consistently spells the word “front” as “frount” and another author spells “barely” as “barley” in every instance it occurs, which I find very distracting and which detracts from the story.

    Also, it’s not just Joe Guy-on-the-Street that makes errors in spelling or usage, because I’ve seen them in books from major publishers. I don’t know whether the author actually made the mistake, but it’s definitely a failure on the part of the editor in not catching and correcting the error.

    There's an awful lot of "not pre-reading" or "not rereading" what one is writing. This is especially the case in forums, I find myself falling into that trap occasionally. Even when I do proof-read a post sometimes I'll miss typos like "if"<->"it" (poor font choice in the forum editor). However, there are a lot (2 words people) of people who are (nominally) native English(1) speakers who just misuse the verbage.

    Kendall

    (1) the English will probably take issue with the American "claim" to speak English. However, considering the dozen or so dialects of English that exist in London alone, I think that we can afford to allow the American version in on this.

    Post edited by Kendall Sears on
  • Kendall SearsKendall Sears Posts: 1,882
    edited December 1969

    mjc1016 said:
    hecate61 said:
    While some spelling errors can be as a result of some type of learning disability, I think the vast majority are from haste, not knowing the correct way to spell or use a word, unfamiliarity with the language, or just plain laziness. I don’t know how many times I’ve read something that contains errors in usage in at least one of the following:

    1. There/they’re/their
    2. Than/then
    3. Definitely/defiantly
    4. Breath/breathe
    5. Of/have

    I’ve been reading some stories by a particular author in which she consistently spells the word “front” as “frount” and another author spells “barely” as “barley” in every instance it occurs, which I find very distracting and which detracts from the story.

    Also, it’s not just Joe Guy-on-the-Street that makes errors in spelling or usage, because I’ve seen them in books from major publishers. I don’t know whether the author actually made the mistake, but it’s definitely a failure on the part of the editor in not catching and correcting the error.

    Don't leave out the fact that your short list is very common in newspapers, online news sources and the 'raw' wire service articles (AP, etc).

    There used to be a job called editor...

    Oh, that job still exists... it has just morphed into a position that makes sure that all prose published supports whichever agenda that particular editor wishes to be supported. In many cases, "editors" spell worse than teachers in an American Public School.

    Kendall

  • T JaimanT Jaiman Posts: 540
    edited October 2012

    Any more examples and I'm going to loose my mind.

    I'd seen loose, for lose, in four places one night. I was about to lose it. It took me about 10 minutes to realize... after I typed it myself.

    "Constant exposure, leads to a certain degree of contamination."

    A spelling error will seem to multiply amongst the populace, and then suddenly die out.

    Who told them?

    I can't tell them, or I'll be a spelling nazi. Must go through PM channels.


    I will consciously, and with forethought, type kinda, knowing full well that somewhere an English teacher is getting his wings, after the heart attack.


    I will also use I dunno. and sorta. I know it's a sin. It's so evil, that I never see anyone else do it. Not even the loosers. (I've seen that one on occasion).

    But, my attitude is: if I can say it, I can transcribe it.

    Hypocrite? Yeah, probably.

    Post edited by T Jaiman on
  • namffuaknamffuak Posts: 899
    edited October 2012

    Frank0314 said:
    I have dyslexia so I have a tendency of murdering the English language. Thank god for spell checker

    Spell checking can be of some assistance, but "putt knot yore faith inn spill chukkars" because you could still have an incorrect word spelled correctly..

    I ran into one author who consistently used "heals" (as in medical cure) when he meant "heels" (the knobs at the back end of the feet, or those long spiky things on women's shoes).

    My pet peeve is they're/their/there - and it can be avoided by remembering a simple sentence: "They're looking at their map to see ho to get there."

    Post edited by namffuak on
  • frank0314frank0314 Posts: 8,584
    edited December 1969

    Believe me I know what your talking about. I have that problem all the time. On top of having to reread a post or sentence to fully comprehend what was said. I'm not a big fan of reading books because of this problem. My kids, one 14 the other 11 read the Harry Potter books in 2 days per book. It took me 4 weeks to read 1 book and that was reading it all day long. I'm just thankful they didn't develop my disabilities.

  • namffuaknamffuak Posts: 899
    edited December 1969

    I feel for you - I don't know what I'd do if I were having reading problems -- mom and I are wandering through retirement (she'll be 89 this month!) reading our way through the local libraries and second-hand book stores.

  • frank0314frank0314 Posts: 8,584
    edited December 1969

    I had to drop out of college because of the problem. I couldn't keep up with the fast pace. I had to record all the lectures and then take my notes at the end of the day.

  • adzanadzan Posts: 209
    edited December 1969

    the one i notice the most from people living in the US is - ' I could care less ' - which is a most peculiar saying,
    I've notice it's becoming more common globally though with the increased use of mobile phones.

  • CbirdCbird Posts: 162
    edited December 1969

    Spell checkers can have an evil sense of humour. I knew one poor guy who tried spelling warehouse with an extra "h". He didn't notice the "correction" to "whorehouse". His job application (a class exercise fortunately) explained how he'd spent the summer moving the goods around in a large whorehouse.

  • cridgitcridgit Posts: 823
    edited December 1969

    adzan said:
    the one i notice the most from people living in the US is - ' I could care less ' - which is a most peculiar saying,
    I've notice it's becoming more common globally though with the increased use of mobile phones.

    Actually, that could turn into an even more biting response: "I could care more". Ouch! That has a bigger sting than "I couldn't care less".

    Spell checkers can have an evil sense of humour. I knew one poor guy who tried spelling warehouse with an extra "h". He didn't notice the "correction" to "whorehouse". His job application (a class exercise fortunately) explained how he'd spent the summer moving the goods around in a large whorehouse.


    Bwaaaaahahahaha! That is SO funny :-)

  • SpottedKittySpottedKitty Posts: 3,248
    edited December 1969

    Cbird said:
    Spell checkers can have an evil sense of humour. I knew one poor guy who tried spelling warehouse with an extra "h". He didn't notice the "correction" to "whorehouse". His job application (a class exercise fortunately) explained how he'd spent the summer moving the goods around in a large whorehouse.

    < snrk > This is why I use the spellchecker between my ears. I always notice when it does something weird.

    Well. almost always...

  • RKane_1RKane_1 Posts: 1,150
    edited December 1969

    A rough road is a coarse course.

    I realize that there are many non-native English speakers in this forum and I give them slack, but to keep them from getting confused and to keep my head from exploding I have to vent at native English speakers with bad habits.

    This is a run-on sentence.

    But, it's all good, of coarse. :P

  • cridgitcridgit Posts: 823
    edited December 1969

    namffuak said:

    "putt knot yore faith inn spill chukkars"


    Ha! That sounds like the Scottish inkeeper from Little Britain. I love that guy.

  • LeatherGryphonLeatherGryphon Posts: 1,726
    edited December 1969

    RKane_1 said:
    A rough road is a coarse course.

    I realize that there are many non-native English speakers in this forum and I give them slack, but to keep them from getting confused and to keep my head from exploding I have to vent at native English speakers with bad habits.

    This is a run-on sentence.

    .... :P

    Ouch! Now it's a run over sentence! :-o

  • JohnDelaquioxJohnDelaquiox Posts: 1,063
    edited December 1969

    Ya know I hardly ever use coarse but of course I use course often.

    Unless I am talking about my beard when stubby or sand paper

  • RKane_1RKane_1 Posts: 1,150
    edited December 1969

    I utilize the word "coarse" when describing select sandpapers and rough language. :)

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